Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml en-gb 30 Sat 04 Jul 2015 12:58:41 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml Furious Filius http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=83#comment5 The 'Disabled Voter' or 'The Disability Vote' I heard Peter White on You and yours the other day speaking to spokespeople from the 3 main parties.It is clear to me that the disabled vote is quite unimportant to all of them, with a little bit of consideration from the Lib-Dems. Most of the parties are making (what amount to) financial commitments to all kinds of groups, ie small businesses, millionaires, etc, but few to disabled people.Depending on whose statistics you use there are variously 1 million to 1.7 million people in the UK who are visually impaired. This is a massive group, but we're clearly unimportant to all of the big 3 parties.I was interested to learn that all of the parties want to get disabled people back into the workplace. But where are the meaningful careers coming from? Having participated in Government schemes supposedly to train me to get back into work, they are nothing but a joke! They are often often lead by young people in their early 20's with few life experiences and often no education beyond 6th Form. In one case, as a disabled person (I am blind) I was lumped into a group with ex-offenders, supposedly reformed drug addicts and non practicing alcoholics. So presumably my local Jobcentre who sent me on this scheme sees my visual impairment in a similar light? If these Government schemes do lead ultimately to employment, rarely is it a meaningful career, instead it is more often than not, demeaning, low paid, dead end work.I was also interested to learn that little value is still being placed on the role played by carers. The monetary value of their work is well known, but then to suggest they should be supported into paid employment. Where are these carers to find the time and energy to care for someone and to carry out - what will probably be - low paid employment? How about paying them for the care they are providing on behalf of social services. As for one week of rest-bite for a carer each year. big deal! So they can have a week off 1 week in 52.As a blind person I am also concerned about the promised increases in DLA for blind people that is supposedly to take place next year. Various charities are suggesting that actually this promise will be broken and we will in fact not get this long promised increase.Winter fuel payments should be more equitably distributed. Starting them at age 65 years makes sense. But I know many retired people here in South Devon whose income far exceeds most of the working age people. They neither need, and very often don't really want, the winter fuel payment. Distribute it more fairly amongst disabled people and the elderly alike. If this means there has to be some kind of entry level benefit, then so be it - ie DLA, Pension Credits, Carer's Allowance, and so on.Perhaps the main reason is disabled people, even those with congenital disabilities rather than those acquired as a result of becoming elderly, are not one coherent group. Society forces us to compete with each other for a finite pot of resources and support. Divided we fall and all that stuff ... The main problem I suspect is, the majority of so called disabled people are elderly (75% of visually impaired people are over the age of 75 years) so they do not identify themselves as disabled, instead they are 'old'. A person of 75 years who is blind is likely to more closely identify with his age group or social group or political affiliation than someone like me who is visually impaired and under 45. NB the average age in Devon I believe is 47 years!In summary, it is clear that disabled people - and specifically blind people - still mean little or nothing to the 3 main parties, despite our actually having a large number of votes. Bring on Proportional Representation and then bring on a party for disabled people! Wed 28 Apr 2010 10:46:32 GMT+1 GotToTheEnd http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=66#comment4 Hey, let's do the whole PM AM GB WED show here!Did you catch 'wot Chote wrote' on Newsnight last night?For the IFS, F for fiasco I think, ecconomies are not cuts, they should hsppen anyway.http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00s7sf2/Newsnight_27_04_2010/(14 mins 40, in)And money spent that is not delivering enough good in a crisis is something different. Not public sector efficiency, that?The quessie is what happens to the money? What is the extra good done with it? To line rich peoples' pockets as money untaxed?Or pay back 'markets'?Where does this idiotic view that markets cannot be told what they should do, come from?It seems part of a set of common assumptions held by politicians from Thatcher to Bush to Cameron and Clegg....and not wholly out of favour with market makers, finance men, hedge fund managers and the rich.Where did the crazy idea that governments cannot create wealth come from Same lot, same set of common assumptions, of course. As if the council house stock, the hospitals, the health centres the schools, the colleges were not part of our country's wealth. An idea not wholly out of favour with market makers, finance men, hedge fund managers and the rich.Where did the potz idea come from that the public sector should be shrunk, pay cut (wanna tell me where I can find Clegg and Cable supporting Unite against WW?), in fact general pain and suffering brought down on our heads for our own good? Same lot, same hackneyed ideas. Again not wholly out of favour with market makers, finance men, hedge fund managers and the rich.Where did the insane idea come from that recession and slump are good for ordinary working people? It was thought so in the 30s here and in the US, thought so by Howe and the Thatherites in the 80s and felt so, so strongly now, that the Labour Party feels compelled to offer it as part of the remedy too. Common assumptions. Again ideas not wholly out of favour with market makers, finance men, hedge fund managers and the rich.The common assumptions of capitalism. Anti - socialism. Again, ideas not wholly out of favour with market makers, finance men, hedge fund managers and the rich.The stronger the mandate we give our next government to bring markets to heel, the more humane our economic policies can becomePleeease, PM, something on cuts being all got up by the media and markets. If you can do it for Bird Flu, Volcanic dust and the credit crunch why not for market tizzy-fits too?You have nothing to lose but your pension fund investments (:-) Wed 28 Apr 2010 08:10:40 GMT+1 Big Sister http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=50#comment3 Perhaps, Eddie, they (the Gremlins, Powers That Be, or whoever) have a clock issue. Tue 27 Apr 2010 17:17:50 GMT+1 MoC http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=33#comment2 Does bbc blog technology count as a government IT project? Hope you didn't have (list of brand names of major consultancy companies that I can't write cos they'll be modded into oblivion) helping you design the system....go to Honest John's Corner ERP Shop instead.Honest John, Honest John, the uvvers are a Con! (Acknowledgements to the Radioactive Team circa 1985) Tue 27 Apr 2010 16:28:29 GMT+1 eddiemair http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=16#comment1 I do not understand anything that's happened. By which I mean EVER. Tue 27 Apr 2010 15:57:51 GMT+1 Lady_Sue http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2010/04/am_glass_box_93.shtml?page=0#comment0 Have the Glass Boxes been effected by the ash cloud from Mount Unpronounceable? Tue 27 Apr 2010 15:30:18 GMT+1