Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml en-gb 30 Thu 30 Jul 2015 00:57:11 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml frenchladybird http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=95#comment19 In view of the swine flu pandemic and the general guidelines to the travelling public about not travelling if anyone, knowlingly, has any of the relevant symptoms, are there any guidelines for the airline industry about maintaining clean air in the passenger cabins?Is it possible to know how often individual companies change the air?I imagine that I cannot be the only person this summer who would like some reassurance that hygiene standards on aircraft, including the air quality, are taken as seriously as in hospitals and other public arenas.Needless to say, I have a vested interest in this as I am travelling to Europe next week on Easy Jet!frenchladybird Wed 29 Jul 2009 08:34:49 GMT+1 Redheylin http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=90#comment18 eee - I'm pig sick of this. Sun 05 Jul 2009 23:48:42 GMT+1 Sindy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=85#comment17 invisibleatheist @ 17I don't think there is a discrepancy. If you've had flu before, you may have immunity. If you go to a 'swine flu party', you don't get immunity - you get flu. That may, of course, give you immunity next time round - assuming you're not dead. Sat 04 Jul 2009 12:30:30 GMT+1 invisibleatheist http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=80#comment16 I can't resolve a couple of discrepancies: we have been told, and I haven't heard anything to the contrary, that people over 55 are not getting swine flu because they will still have some immunity from the last pandemic. We are also told that 'swine flu parties' are a bad thing and we should go to one as it won't confer immunity to have had it when it returns in the autumn [will it have gone away before it returns?]. So forty years ago gives immunity still, but a couple of months apart gives none. Anyone else spot the problem?What about all the people who've been getting flu injections every winter? Are they similarly protected up to a point? My advice would be to take echinacea regularly, I do. It is a herbal stimulant of the immune system, and I haven't had flu or a cold now for twenty plus years, in fact I haven't been sick with anything in that time. People whose immune system is challenged, such as those suffering from cancer chemotherapy which wipes it out, should certainly be taking echinacea. Available from all good herbal supplies, health shops etc. Sat 04 Jul 2009 10:42:01 GMT+1 Chris Ghoti http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=75#comment15 If you go in to work, what you have got isn't flu, I suspect.The advice about not going to the doctor's surgery is otiose: you wouldn't get there if you were suffering from flu. You might make it as far as a telephone...If this is not the case with swine flu, it is mild indeed, remembering the Asian flu of the late fifties which took me about six weeks to get over (ie to stop having a fever) and kept my brother off school for almost a somplete term. Fri 03 Jul 2009 22:21:36 GMT+1 U14056635 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=70#comment14 Cagulae - I can't remember if he was on WatO or PM yesterday, but Liam Donaldson gave a list of typical conditions that could render people more vulnerable- basically anything major like cancer, HIV/AIDS, serious heart conditions etc. And swine flu, at present, seems less debilitating than 'normal' seasonal flu. The only problem is that a lot more people are going to catch it than will catch 'normal' flu. Fri 03 Jul 2009 14:27:21 GMT+1 andrew booton http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=65#comment13 Boysaboys (13): Why not? I'm talking about BROAD terms, not a specific person's medical history. I'd like to know what SORT of conditions might make one vulnerable, eg they already had HIV, or they were on aspirin. I just want to know how serious swine flu really is, not individuals' full medical histories. Fri 03 Jul 2009 13:02:45 GMT+1 U14056635 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=60#comment12 Cagulae - No, you can't - at least not in relation to any particular individual. Patient confidentiality continues after death, I hope. Fri 03 Jul 2009 12:56:35 GMT+1 andrew booton http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=55#comment11 I'm frustrated by the term used to describe the nature of the death: 'suffering from (serious) underlying health problems.' Can we please be told, within the confines of that great modern excuse 'medical confidentiality', what sort of underlying health problems made the victim so susceptible so that we may better gauge our own vulnerabilities? Fri 03 Jul 2009 12:40:15 GMT+1 mfsmith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=50#comment10 Could the doctor discuss if being infected now with swine flu would give some immunity against a future more deadly strain of the H1N1? Thu 02 Jul 2009 15:51:06 GMT+1 Dr Bee http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=45#comment9 Hello Sequin / FergusI wondered if the figure of 100,000 new infections per day by the end of August is predicted to be the peak infection rate or if it is likely to rise beyond that - and if so by how much? What percentage of the population is likely to get this strain by the time the outbreak eases? Thu 02 Jul 2009 13:04:02 GMT+1 Jem Stone http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=40#comment8 For info: Fergus Walsh has his own blog http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/ferguswalsh/ ; "Fergus on Flu which answers some of the queries above. Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:51:27 GMT+1 T8-eh-T8 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=35#comment7 Ferguc - How do I know if I (or my family) have swine flu as opposed to normal flu?I have heard that doctors are not even testing for swine flu unless there are additional complications.So how do I judge whether to go into work, send the kids to school, or just carry on as best we can? Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:44:49 GMT+1 Big Sister http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=30#comment6 Fergus: What is the advice relating to assisting anyone elderly who contracts the flu? I am thinking here of my widowed mother, who I'd want to assist, so would probably go and live with while she was ill (and therefore would undoubtedly become infected - but I have no problem with this). People living alone who are likely to become unsteady or a danger to themself will need assistance, I feel. Can Fergus take this issue up? Surely it is something that needs to be discussed openly in the light of the new advice? Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:39:48 GMT+1 U14056677 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=25#comment5 1. Is the virus getting more serious in its effects? You mentioned 5 days in bed, now. Is that what it was like a month ago? Then we were told it was mild. Does that mean it is less mild now?2. What should we do when we get it? Is it 'Lots of liquid' or 'Lots of good food' Keep warm or Keep cool? Eat rich food or not? Execise if possible or not? Across the counter preparations, yes or no?3. Should we consult a doctor?4. When are other people infectious?5. How are other people infectious?6. How long between picking up the infection and feeling ill?7. Are strains abroad (Europe, America etc) worse than here? Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:36:42 GMT+1 mittfh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=20#comment4 Hmm...this post is called "any_questions_3.shtml", the Previous link is for a non-existent "any_questions_2.shtml" - looks as though Sequin's still having teething problems with the new blog format... Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:30:35 GMT+1 humblelife http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=15#comment3 With the temperatures at a record high, is there a chance of a return for Malaria?Equally, does the heat allow standard virus's the condition to become super-bugs? Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:24:14 GMT+1 RxKaren http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=10#comment2 Fergus - with the isolation of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 in Denmark what efforts are being made in the UK to control access to Tamiflu? Within this PCT no pharmacist is supposed to be dispensing Tamiflu against a private prescription and we have been reporting "flyers" offering us Tamiflu to the PCT. However I am aware that Occupational Health schemes have pre-purchased Tamiflu for their staff and I've received spam email offering it to me as a private individual at extortionate prices. The supply chain seems to be a bit "leaky" - surely this will increase the potential for resistance? Thu 02 Jul 2009 12:05:21 GMT+1 steelpulse http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=5#comment1 Fergus -am I wrong in suggesting that it is puzzling why swine flu is still so high in the news? Given mortality rates - the number - for swine flu - and I do not want to seem hard hearted (every death diminishes me etc) aren't the normal - if that the right word - seasonal influenzas taking a higher number of the susceptible? The elderly, infirmed etc. Thu 02 Jul 2009 11:57:52 GMT+1 Charlie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/pm/2009/07/any_questions_3.shtml?page=0#comment0 FergusCan you help? I've asked this before but no-one seems to have an answer. As I'm a fellow with a pink curly tail, four trotters and large-ish ears and snout, I'm concerned... So, if I "catch" swine-flu, will I become dis-gruntled..? Thu 02 Jul 2009 11:43:15 GMT+1