Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html en-gb 30 Thu 02 Jul 2015 18:36:03 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html lordBanners http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=99#comment438 Future of Libraries in Written Word, is as Guardians of TRUTH and Preservers of FACT, moreso now than before Internet.It all depends on how Society VALUES anything. It always IRKS me that Wheel of Fortune paid-out more than Jeopardy.(Compared because they are owned by same person).On-line sources so many swear-by, are too readily Edited and subject to propagandist projections depending on Flavour of the day. It's a DECEIVERS' Paradise.WHERE?? Locate Libraries on School Grounds - readily available to Students, and refresh Adults(parental)association with Schools in everyday life, while providing casual snippets of Aspiring Futures and possible Corrections to Days gone By.We'll ALL do it, but WHY should every Generation make the same mistakes? Then act as if they've Discovered something. Fri 27 Aug 2010 03:59:19 GMT+1 Andrew http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=99#comment437 I used to visit our library quite regulary but times change and unfortunatly our library has MASSIVE selection of romance and mills and boons fire lighters, as well as every single computer and programming books is out of date by about 15 years.learn to program your vic20 is one of their selectionSO in the end i just stopped going in fact i could say my home science fiction library is 100 times better with far wider range of selection.And it just takes the biscuit when you go to rent out a book and then find out its the first in a trilogy but they havnt bothered buying the other 2 books.The problem with libraries is that literature moves too quickly for them to keep up. Would be better if i could go down to the library plug my iphone in and download the books i want OR a kindle or some other PDA that way you could reduce the size of the library by about 2 thirds and ensure that all the books are up to date.Other wise i cant see a point for them. Thu 26 Aug 2010 21:02:33 GMT+1 RMackinnon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=99#comment436 Of course they have a future are they not part Of our Education that has Evolved over Millenia !!! Computers are Free,Books are,Music,Art well what more do you need DOH! And you can meet people there who are in your Area ?Yeah get Rid (Plato,Socrates, ETC).DOH! Thu 26 Aug 2010 20:06:06 GMT+1 Ralphie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=99#comment435 431. At 4:37pm on 26 Aug 2010, bionicpirate wrote:369. At 1:06pm on 25 Aug 2010, Rupert Smyth wrote:"Attention all lefties!!!Get down to your local library and join immediately then when it closes you will be able to criticise the government for closing down a valued resource much used by the local community."You're too late, I've had a library card since I was three, and now I have one for the library near my parents and one for the library where I live. Just because you don't like people who are left-wing doesn't mean we're all hypocrites when we say that public services should stick around. Some of us, believe it or not, actually use those services.////Mr Smyth does not not like lefties. He doesn't know what a lefty is. He does not like me and I am not a lefty. He should join a library, read some books and realise that the world isn't black and white. But that's utopian. I guess Mr Smyth prefers to ignorantly rant and rave at anything he doesn't understand and believe he's expressing an opinion. And if that includes libraries, then we've really hit a low. But because I read a lot, that doesn't surprise me anymore. Thu 26 Aug 2010 19:26:36 GMT+1 Ellis Grace http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=98#comment434 I work at the library. Perhaps it is dependent on your location, but if anything, I see more people at the library. And maybe I do see a little less books being checked out. But the library has movies, music, magizines and computers as well as wifi. And since it's summer there's air conditioning. Thu 26 Aug 2010 18:12:01 GMT+1 eswar http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=98#comment433 Libraries build up future and hence should have a future.Its benefits are innumerable,invisible and immeasureable.With the internet browsing culture galloping the pressure on libraries will ease and more books will be available for borrowers for a longer period.However there is a need to improve the services by providing convenient timings, restricting the number of books per visit threby making popular books available to more users . Libraries are still the need of the hour as many cannot afford the cost of all the books they need at all times.The public should also donate books at their homes which are rotting and occupying their limited space.The tendency to accumulate books should be avoided as the joy of sharing knowledge at no extra cost is immense indeed! Thu 26 Aug 2010 16:53:02 GMT+1 LE Mental http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=98#comment432 Libraries are vital. I just can't prefer to read off of a computer screen or digital book block. We get free DVDs which save a fortune and my trips to and fro the library are a joy and discovery of learning. I even like to read some of the children's books. I just discovered a Korean Fairy Tale which is similar to Cinderella. Who knew? Now I do. Without the I Ching environment of a library - the ability to move around at random and discover interesting reading material we the public would be at the forces of media control and maniupulation.Freedom of paper print and libraries must be mandatory now and in the future. I have a marvellous collection of old de-commissioned books from my local library's books sales held twice yearly. To me these are priceless works which I purchased late in the after for $5 all you can carry. Thu 26 Aug 2010 16:08:32 GMT+1 nya http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=98#comment431 I cannot imagine a world without libraries. There are not only places for gathering information and gaining knowledge, but also intellectual social gathering places. Thu 26 Aug 2010 15:39:14 GMT+1 bionicpirate http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=97#comment430 369. At 1:06pm on 25 Aug 2010, Rupert Smyth wrote:"Attention all lefties!!!Get down to your local library and join immediately then when it closes you will be able to criticise the government for closing down a valued resource much used by the local community."You're too late, I've had a library card since I was three, and now I have one for the library near my parents and one for the library where I live. Just because you don't like people who are left-wing doesn't mean we're all hypocrites when we say that public services should stick around. Some of us, believe it or not, actually use those services. Thu 26 Aug 2010 15:37:51 GMT+1 recrec http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=97#comment429 Once I was an avid libarary goer. Lately I have stopped going to my library simply because the books are not available. Specific examples I was interested in reading about Vaughan Williams - nothing in my local library. I wanted to red some poetry - nothing in my local library. I bought the relevant works second hand off the internet. I would have bought them from local shops but sadly all we have is W H Smith.The libraries are of value if they serve as repositories of knowledge. The minute they turned into DVD/CD/populist systems they faltered. In truth since the 1p rate was abolished they have declined steadily and are not likely to revive until someone with some sense insists we have proper libraries. Thu 26 Aug 2010 14:47:26 GMT+1 Citizen GKar http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=97#comment428 Should we keep our libraries? Yes. I'd rather have public libraries with plenty of books in them and reduce the number of managers, mps, paid councillors and other overpaid hangers on.As for a good reason for retaining books and libraries as repositories of knowledge may I suggest the following :-1. Go to your local library2. Ask the Librararian for a book written by Walter M. Miller Jnr with the title "A Canticle for Liebowitz"3. If they have it, borrow it and read it. if they don't ask if they can get it on interlibrary loans then borrow it and read it4. Understand what it is saying.5. Value what you want to throw away.It also deals with another organisation that certain portions of our society would like to see abolished.Of course, you can abolish the libraries - a pity because the next thing to be abolished would all copies of "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury, "1984" and "Animal Farm" by George Orwell, and probably "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley.... I could continue with this list..... Thu 26 Aug 2010 13:09:01 GMT+1 junko_loves_spuds http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=97#comment427 2. At 10:33am on 24 Aug 2010, David Horton wrote:Not only that, but as an avid PDA reader, the day of the library is passing.This myth that it is still the vibrant hub of the community needs to be stilled.We are facing an era of unprecedented cust in Public Spending. The axe should fall squarely on the library and all other minority use establishments. If you want it, you pay for it.How would you know if its only minority of people who use them. It was that sort of thinking that got rid of local post offices that provided access who people who couldn't drive and needed something nearby.Your way of thinking sounds very middle-class tory (get rid of it so that the working classes suffer) are you David Cameron in disguise? Thu 26 Aug 2010 12:33:25 GMT+1 bionicpirate http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=97#comment426 My local library is the one in Reading town centre, and I have to say, it's a very good example of what a library needs to be and do to be successful. It opens until 7pm two days a week for those who work. There are up-to-date technical books- some of which I used as a student over the last few years, as the books were more likely to be available than the same ones in the university library. On Saturday mornings there are activities for children, which are all associated with books (poetry mornings, visits from somebody dressed as a popular character etc) and there are also book clubs for adults running at that time. The selection of books is quite good too, and things like graphic novels, comics or horror aren't seen as 'not good enough'. There was actually a display of manga- Japanese comic book art- last summer along with an open day where the library worked with local shops to put on an event for young geeky people like myself who enjoy these more unusual books.I understand that not all libraries are able to do these things due to their size or lack of funding, but I think for those who could budget for it, running a library like Reading is run is a good idea. We do need libraries, whatever some people might say- not all of us have the money or space to keep buying books. I know you can give them away, but if you're that way inclined, use the library! You don't end up paying a fiver for a book you'll only ever read once, and somebody else will still get to read it after you've finished. Thu 26 Aug 2010 12:31:02 GMT+1 junko_loves_spuds http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=96#comment425 Libraries should definately have a future - I often visit my local library for reading material. I refuse to pay Waterstones or other bookshop prices (as they stick to RRP - which could be anything from £5.99 - £10.99 for a paperback). I realise Amazon are much cheaper but for me books are read and then passed on for someone else to read.The use of PDAs does not interest me and I am 25, I've tried using ibooks on my ipod and its just not the same.In this time of recession its great knowing that libraries are available for me to use within my county Thu 26 Aug 2010 12:20:31 GMT+1 Chris http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=96#comment424 I believe that libraries do have a place in our society but that they also need to keep pace with the times.Making books available online is the way to go. The copyright considerations need to be taken into account but this is the way people will find it useful and convenient in the modern age.They also need to ensure that the content they are offering is useful to researchers etc and not just an array of works of fiction. Thu 26 Aug 2010 11:52:22 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=96#comment423 419. At 09:50am on 26 Aug 2010, ipswichred wrote:NewSuspect-Smith – there are quiet areas in the library too!Where is your evidence that illiteracy is rising? Record GCSE & A Level results contradict your argument.It is not immoral to fund entertainment because entertainment is one of the joys of life. One of the things that makes people feel inspired, humbled, happy, elated …..There are many things in life that we don’t pay for (I have never had cause to use the Police & apart from when I was born (!) have never used a hospital). I am still happy to pay for these because ALL members of the community need them.Resources for all v resources for the privileged rich?------------------------------------------ You are right, I cannot obtain official figures for adult literacy rates in the UK after 2003 and so I cannot say that they are rising. However, a report by the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee in 2003, the situation is bad. Quoting from the report:" In 2003, research commissioned by the former Department for Education and Skills suggested that 23.8 million adults (75% of the adult population of working age) in England had numeracy skills below Level 2, the level of a good pass at GCSE, and 17.8 million (56 %) had literacy skills below this level."Entertainment is indeed one of the joys of life, so what? So are drugs, sex and rock and roll. The difference between public funding of entertainment and funding of the police, armed forces, health services etc. lies in the arbitrary nature of the service provided. Key services, even maternity benefits serve all. What constitutes 'entertainment' seems to be a matter of the personal choice of a few autocrats. It is invidious to subsidise minority entertainments like opera and ballet in London whilst refusing to subsidise premier league ticket prices or visits to the local pub, which are entertainments for the many. Yes, the argument is fatuous but so is the 'bread and circus' approach of "Big Socialist Government" which sees the public as dependants. As for 'the privileged rich', they get more public subsidy than the rest. They would because government is conducted largely for their benefit. You get the crumbs. I would like to stop both their subsidy and yours. Thu 26 Aug 2010 10:35:23 GMT+1 perfectordinaryman http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=96#comment422 Times have changed; when I was in Secondary education the library was the ONLY way of doing any research. Books (and Librarians) were treated like sacred objects and cost an arm and a leg. Now you have offers at well known sites that need no advertising by me and other that sell your unwanted books/stuff cheaply. Why not link the libraries to local schools? That way the poorest in our society will still have access to the opportunity of education and knowledge without cost. Most schools are centrally based in our communities and if we use already subsidised sites it could free up money to provide more mobile services for those in outlying areas or a mobile OAP service for those less mobile. Nothing is perfect but this service is needed more and more at this time especially for those most needy in our nation. If you link this "service" with a supermarket we will see them advertising "why borrow when you can buy"....plus it will eventually be privatisation by the back door and then you'll only be able to borrow the books they want to stock. Don't let the private sector in - it's a service without prejudice and can open the door do prosperity and social mobility for the most in need. Thu 26 Aug 2010 10:27:51 GMT+1 Portman http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=95#comment421 When I got made redundant last year the first thing I did was join the library. I was glad that it was there because without books life would be empty. Shut down other stuff, I mean there is a load of nonsense out there after all, but keep the libraries going. They may not have an immense usage but so what, are numbers everything to you people. They matter a lot to a few and that is a critical part of our society. Or do our new Tory overlords still not believe in a society, big or otherwise. I suspect that is still the case. Thu 26 Aug 2010 10:22:59 GMT+1 yourfriendjapan http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=95#comment420 I haven’t used libraries for a decade, because I was so busy that it was hard for me to return the books to library. If I can use the post or courier services for returning the books I will try to use libraries again. Thu 26 Aug 2010 09:21:40 GMT+1 Ralphie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=95#comment419 I'd rather close supermarkets in favour of local shops. They're phasing out cashiers as well now. Who i dehumanising society, and why? Thu 26 Aug 2010 09:13:04 GMT+1 Orwell Boy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=95#comment418 383. At 3:22pm on 25 Aug 2010, NewSuspect-Smith wrote:What you describe-children's groups, 'activities', magazines and music- sounds like a cross between a 'palace of varieties' and a music retail chainstore. It seems an alien environment in which to sample the works of 'the greatest minds who have ever lived' some of which are a difficult read and not 'entertaining' at all. How many of your cool 'clientele' bother with that old 'window dressing'? Despite all this progressive spending and record exam results every year' illiteracy in the UK is actually rising and thus claims made for libraries as essential for educational resources are not demonstrated. Clearly from these posts public access to good books is loosing the battle for 'bums on seats'. Hence all the talk of associating libraries with undemanding activities like drinking or shopping. It is immoral to fund entertainment,whether it be Covent Garden opera for the rich or so-called 'libraries' for others by extorting 'tax' money from the many who cannot (Grand Opera) or do not use them. If these things are such good entertainment, you pay for them but count me out please, NO BRAINER, leave me out.NewSuspect-Smith – there are quiet areas in the library too!Where is your evidence that illiteracy is rising? Record GCSE & A Level results contradict your argument.It is not immoral to fund entertainment because entertainment is one of the joys of life. One of the things that makes people feel inspired, humbled, happy, elated …..There are many things in life that we don’t pay for (I have never had cause to use the Police & apart from when I was born (!) have never used a hospital). I am still happy to pay for these because ALL members of the community need them.Resources for all v resources for the privileged rich?NO BRAINER Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:50:09 GMT+1 Nuttymut http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=94#comment417 My good lady is a qualified Librarian and has worked for the Local Authority now since she left school in our local library. That's 26 years.Firstly let me say she isn't highly paid for what she does, regardless of the fact that she has a degree in her chosen profession. Her salary is about 23K. I feel that she offers excellent value for money in her role. Although I am currently not working, when I do I pay about £1,200 a month in taxes. That makes me a tax payer - and although I am probably somewhat biased about my good lady I still feel as a tax payer she offers excellent value for money.When our little girl was born, Mummy was keen to read to her. I was, to say the least somewhat surprised that she should read to a little girl, who [in my opinion] was unable to take it all in. I challenged my good lady and she said it was proven that reading to small children helps them to get a good start in life. I smiled and left it be.Now I am eating crow big time. My 3 year old daughter has superb control of the English language. She constantly uses words that just bewilder me. She can even spell her own name - which is no mean feat as she is called Sophieanne. She can also write it down. It's not yet recognisable, but it's a sure start. She will be at school in a years time and she will be able to read and write before she gets there.Every night she has a couple of stories read to her. She has plenty of books to choose from. She often goes to the library to pick some books from the childrens section.Libraries, like most services need to continue to evolve, but we must never forget that they provide a service which is enshrined in statute. That it is a government requirement to provide books for those who can ill afford to buy them.Our local library has been replacing staff that leave with automatic tills. No one has been made redundant.When I see how advanced and confident my little girl is, simply because her mum read to her from a very early age, then I have to say I can see the need for libraries more than ever.Libraries also provide central points for community information and much more. Our local library has 20 internet points complete with screens and keyboards. The area is always in use.Libraries have never been well represented at high levels. Getting the message across of what they provide, and why is always called into doubt at every recession.Maybe it's time a senior member of government took up the role of conveying the information about libraries and how they fit into our education system and how they get information into the public domain.I have read one person saying that the choice of books from their local library isn't good. All libraries allow us to request books. They can usually access what you need by using other libraries or the British Library.I hope I have conveyed in part some of the hidden and unseen benefits of libraries. Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:23:04 GMT+1 ProfPhoenix http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=94#comment416 My comments are being erased. Try again.Libraries are places where people can meet, recommend books, and exhange a few ideas. Post Offices too, are places where people can meet and exhange ideas and have live discussions. Obviously dangerous places in an authoritarian state and need to be closed down. Much better to encourage internet chat and heavily moderated HYS for isolated individuals, contributing to the big society.Then I thought of another British institution: the fish and chip shop. Why, the other day I was in the queue listening to people talk about the coalition, unemployment, cuts, immigration, and so on. These places need to be closed down. Apart from open discussion they serve unhealth food, probably contribute to global warming, and - God know how - can be replaced by the internet. They belong to a past where working class people ate their food from newspapers and then read them in order to learn about current affairs. Better off without them: let them eat kebabs. Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:22:17 GMT+1 ProfPhoenix http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=94#comment415 Libraries are places where people might meet, recommend books to each other and exchange ideas. Likewise Post Offices offer opportunities to meet other people and exchange idea. This must be threatening to our ever increasing authoritarian state where discussion is limited to internet chat lines and a heavily moderated HYS for the isolated individual. So I have thought of another great British institution to to axe. The Fish and Chip Shop. Why, the other day I was in a fish and chip shop and customers were talking about the coalition, immigration and cuts to pensions etc. Obviously these places sell unhealthy food, contribute to global warming, posing a threat to the leadership of the big society, and belong to a past where working class people ate their food from newspapers, from which they learned of current affairs. With the internet - God knows how - we can phase out the chip shop. Let them eat kebabs. Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:11:19 GMT+1 Tienhoa http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=94#comment414 It is no doubt nowadays more people go to a pub or supermarket rather than a traditional library and the cause behind this trend is the development of internet. They could find out about information and knowledge at home by access to the web. A good idea to encourage people to read books is to be libraries at public places such as park, supermarket etc. Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:05:21 GMT+1 arunmehta http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=94#comment413 Yes, they do have a future and they have to fostered and nurtured for posterity as there is no substitute to a hard copy of atlas,or a coffee table size reference manuals/amanacs with rich illustrations/photographs on variety of subjects. Thu 26 Aug 2010 08:00:55 GMT+1 Nazia http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=93#comment412 Internet facility has ruined the library culture among students.Library is not only source of books /knowledge but it is best place of passing time in some manners, giving physical efforts to search for desirable literature and meeting/sharing talks with book lovers.So library is real rendezvous point for watching people as live human being.But net cafe and enclosed internet world have isolated our youth to knowledge only and they are tending towards solitary life which is without human contact and gestures.So to enhance real human contacts/knowledge through sharing verbal and physical gestures,it is imperative to develop new kind of library culture so that human contacts would be improved in literate environment. Thu 26 Aug 2010 07:58:54 GMT+1 Silvia http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=93#comment411 392 - Recommend this comment - one of the most insightful I've read. Thu 26 Aug 2010 07:51:13 GMT+1 Chris http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=93#comment410 Libraries are an excellent facility. However, it has become so cheap to buy books while you are out shopping, at outlets like The Works and other bargain book shops, that the effort to go to the library just doesn't seem worth it. I purchased £700 worth of books for £40 from The Book People. Awesome. I can then read them at my leisure, without the restiction of a timescale imposed by a library. The only libraries I have used in the past 30 years are those set up for the Armed Forces in remote areas, through kind donations from the public and charities. They were a godsend at times. Thu 26 Aug 2010 07:21:11 GMT+1 chrislabiff http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=93#comment409 I thought the government wanted us to all be dumbed down? This is a good thing isn't it? Thu 26 Aug 2010 05:43:44 GMT+1 braveraddish http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=92#comment408 yesterday, paid my fine 2.86p, updated my books. I can't do without a library, there are too many books to read and not enough time.We have a nice library at our local college, perhaps the two could be combined, giving the general public access to academic learning materials. But really its not right to have non students accessing the campus. Thu 26 Aug 2010 00:28:33 GMT+1 sizzler http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=92#comment407 Who needs a library when we have the internet. Wed 25 Aug 2010 23:56:31 GMT+1 paul doherty http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=92#comment406 This post has been Removed Wed 25 Aug 2010 23:49:18 GMT+1 paul doherty http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=92#comment405 if they close all the libraries,who gets to keep the books? Wed 25 Aug 2010 23:43:49 GMT+1 S C MEHTA http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=92#comment404 Nothing can replace the charm and usage of the libraries. No amount of electronic modes can compare or compete with the touch and smell of books; when you hold any good books in your hands, you feel being caring/craving for their knowledge contents and also being respectful to their authors or creators. The stocking of the libraries should continuously be updated and short-listed so as to keep remaining qualitative, tasteful, interesting and informative. The best places for establishing popular libraries could be the heritage/cultural/educational/natural(sprawling & popular gardens) sites. There has never been a proper and persuasive effort or mode to attract/invite/encourage people to appreciate the beauty of the books. Wed 25 Aug 2010 23:00:31 GMT+1 Ralphie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=91#comment403 In my neck of the woods (well, urban jungle) a number of libraries have undergone massive refurbishments which I was more than happy to pay tax for. It is now aimed at a mix of older people and youngsters. It seems to do the job, 'cause some of them are regularly quite packed and thrive with a lively mixed cultural and "generian" buzz. I wonder how many of the usual curmudgeons (god, how boring you are) who agree with this idea have actually been to a library recently. And don't get me started on this further contradiction in Devious Dave's Big Society idea. Wed 25 Aug 2010 22:29:17 GMT+1 Chris http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=91#comment402 Do Libraries have a future?Intersting question.Do services that assist people out of poverty have a future?No - there is the most extreme right wing government in office since Maggie found several knives in her back. Wed 25 Aug 2010 21:51:47 GMT+1 Valleywonder http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=91#comment401 I went into my local library for the first time in over two years last month. It was only refurbished 18 months ago and gave the appearance of utterly uninspirational drabness, which appeared more of an overspill homeless shelter than a place to spend time in quiet contemplation reading or studying. The stench of bodily and other unpleasant human odours was overwhelming and the staff looked like characters out of little britain. A particulary unfriendly, greasy and overweight lady told me without breaking a smile that I had to pay an outstanding 56p fine from 2 years ago before I could borrow a guidebook for a planned citybreak. I think I'll just pop to Waterstones and get the rough guide next time following this utterly depressing experience... Wed 25 Aug 2010 21:36:08 GMT+1 Apolloin http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=91#comment400 In their current incarnation there is literally no reason for libraries to be preserved - it is completely inefficient to maintain paper storage of information in the face of the digital information age. Libraries are about fifty years out of date now, and their relevance will just keep dropping in the future.In order to stock a book, as it is now, a library has to buy MULTIPLE copies of it for EACH library site! Why not simply have a single copy of the work on the library database and allow as many people as need it to download it? Old printed works could be OCR scanned and kept - converted to PDFs. Libraries could become virtual backbones - spend the money on bandwidth and storage space and have locals apply for memberships to fund the costs. The actual buildings could provide free Wifi to members and with connections to the document storage servers. Soft drinks and comfortable chairs could be provided.New search engines could be devised that would allow better searching and, with a common search engine available at a community level, classes could be offered in research technique, ethics and search engine use - allowing Librarians to pass on knowledge again. Wed 25 Aug 2010 21:35:37 GMT+1 spillman6 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=90#comment399 I love my library,it gives me great pleasure,as I read many book.The librarians are great nothing to much trouble,nice to be able to read the daily newspapers in peace and quiet,nice little exhibitions,and a mine of local information etc The children enjoy activities there also.Keep our libraries going Wed 25 Aug 2010 21:00:14 GMT+1 louise http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=90#comment398 at 21 i have spent a lot of the last 3 years of my life in a library while studying for my degree, however this library is modern with plenty of space to do work, work in groups, use computers and read books. There is a light and airy feel about the library, not dark and dank like some! there are so many books for everyone, academic and leisure! however in normal sized local libraries there are certainly not enough books that i would like to read. I dont read for leisure, I like to learn but they havent got many books i could get from my university library and no i have graduated, it saddens me but luckily i will just get my partner to get them out as he still works at the uni. Also I have to say i have no Idea where my local library is!! there needs to be more advertisement! Wed 25 Aug 2010 20:18:39 GMT+1 Sjeh76 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=90#comment397 Campus libraries and village libraries are necessary, I think. But I don't think any library should be lost. It's not just the books and DVD's and what-have-you - they offer essential things like social groups for the elderly, disabled or unemployed. They're just really great places - treasure them.The internet ain't a font of information in exchange for a one off fee of 50p for life membership yet, after all. But my Library is! Wed 25 Aug 2010 20:15:47 GMT+1 zelod http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=90#comment396 I hope they do everything is way to digitized, we need the printed book to livepeople should write more letters to each other (no email)whenever I see a person on the subway with one of those ebook thingies I just wanna smash them Wed 25 Aug 2010 20:10:03 GMT+1 sparklynoona http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=89#comment395 If libraries are so endangered and outmoded can someone tell me why my local library (that I worked in for a short time) is always packed out, full of people using the computers, browsing, borrowing and reading books, doing local history research etc? Not to mention the fact that libraries are very important in provision of social meeting places and large print books for the elderly, and my local council provides a books-on-wheels service for the housebound and their carers. Not to mention that a lot of people were in there using the computers because they didn't have a computer or internet at home, or needed a bit of extra help understanding the machines.Not to mention that children of all ages and even many teenagers were in the library reading and borrowing books.Not to mention the fact that the library provided a weekly bibliotherapy book group for those with permanent mental health issues to help with reading for literacy, reading for escape, and reading for social interaction. There are also book groups for the visually impaired, with similar social aspects. In addition to the special book groups there are regular book groups for appreciation of literature and social interaction.Yes, in some aspects some libraries could do with modernisation, with mobile-accessible catalogues, more online content, and rental of e-books perhaps. But can you seriously tell me that public libraries should just vanish because they cost money?? Wed 25 Aug 2010 19:02:16 GMT+1 clamdip lobster claws http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=89#comment394 Don't close libraries. Turn them into schools or tutoring/testing centers because so many people are allowed to cheat on tests and are working in professions they shouldn't be in. A testing center could put a stop to this cheating nonsense once and for all and then you don't have to wonder how the idiot working next to you got their job. Wed 25 Aug 2010 17:38:40 GMT+1 mridul_h http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=89#comment393 With all information readily available digitally over internet, the demand of Books by us from Library to enable us to draw out references to acquire it as well as to complete our incomplete knowledge on a particular Subject has fallen drastically nonetheless existence of such Institutions amongst us is not yet become irrelevant, being the taste temporarily overtaken by our mass emotions and desire of getting all answers quickly or as fast as possible. With Google and similar others publishing entire contents of a particular Book of much interest on all subjects in digital form, our requirements to visit libraries have come under the category of stress to us but as far as collection of finer knowledge on a particular Subject of interest is concern, the Library is the best answer to find the same.Again, our dependence upon computers may not be forever as any disturbances within the environment might cause either the internet or Computer too behaves iritic being such Machines are mainly based on complex commands feed into a static but unstable or vibrating chip to get such results. Therefore if there is any heavy fluctuation of the existing electro-magnetic fields within the Globe for whatever reason, we shall instantly lose this medium of communication to interact with each other to gather knowledge. Therefore, we believe that the demand of the existence of Libraries shall continue play its part within us being the knowledge collected from these Institutions are physical in nature not to feel such disturbances out of the effect. Therefore any rearrangements of sites might draw Customers to visit such places still. (Dr.M.M.HAZARIKA, PhD) Wed 25 Aug 2010 17:32:22 GMT+1 DublinMonks http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=89#comment392 382. At 3:13pm on 25 Aug 2010, Katz_in_Bedford wrote:Books were then, and still are, a wondrous source of escape. I love building up a picture of what the characters and places look like from the author’s description. There’s been many a time when I’ve read a book cover to cover in one sitting as the story gripped my attention so much. I see all books as acquaintances (many of whom I’ve not met yet) and many are friends that I’ve loved, even if fleetingly. I’m sure that my love of reading helped me throughout my school days and has certainly not hindered me since. Without books, my world would definitely be very much poorer. ==================================================Exactly the same for me, I always miss the people when I finish a good book Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:48:00 GMT+1 totallyunbiased http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=89#comment391 It seems to be an omnipresent problem that the way one person lives in order to make themselves happy may cause another person to live in unhappiness, and I guess to some extent this lurks in the library question (I could well be 'wrong' though). It does seem to me there is a large disparity in the nature of the lives of people in the UK today which then leads to large discrepancies in the attitudes voiced on this issue; it can be hard to see beyond our own bubble so the need for communication in some form continues and personally I like libraries and I do frequent them. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:47:27 GMT+1 clamdip lobster claws http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=88#comment390 Libraries shouldn't close they should be turned into tutoring and testing centers so schools and colleges don't allow students to cheat on national exams. There is so much incompetence around because so many doctors, lawyers, teachers have cheated on their exams. Testing should be independent. Do you ever wonder how the incompetent employee next to you got their job? Now you know. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:44:24 GMT+1 Rupert Smyth http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=88#comment389 372. At 1:24pm on 25 Aug 2010, Three Million Posse On Employed In A Dub wrote:Could anyone out there tell me what this song sounds like or whether it is politically apt for this next round of govern mental bleeding edge cuts which penalise the poor and suck up to their rich corporate common purpose paymasters by the sold out LIBCON coalition political hypocritical no morality losers*Kaiser Chiefs - I Predict A Riothttp://www.muzu.tv/kaiserchiefs/i-predict-a-riot-music-video/253244?country=gb(*) = This recycled charity donated Pooter I'm using ain't got no sound card and the internet cafe site requires Adobe Flash Palayer and a browser with Java Script enabled whatever that Techie gobblygook means-------------------------------------------------------The computer was no doubt donated by a hard worker. The same hard worker who works for a 'rich corporate paymaster' and who like the company they work for pays taxes which give you the money to sit at home all day writing tripe about the 'poor'. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:14:19 GMT+1 Terry-Yaki http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=88#comment388 "160. At 2:41pm on 24 Aug 2010, th3_0r4cl3 wrote:108. At 1:10pm on 24 Aug 2010, Bolibify wrote:@th3_0r4cl3 "I would challenge anyone to find a single topic that is not fully covered on wiki" This is exactly why libraries ARE needed. Wikis are rarely authoritative sources as they can be edited and added to by anyone. There have been several cases of very experienced journalists quoting mis-information that they have got from Wikipedia that they have not checked with a credible source and as a result they were made laughing stocks. Not all the information on the internet is reliable.======================================================================I agree not all information on the internet is reliable, then again neither is the information in printed for or in the media as a whole, but at-least with the internet you can quickly check the sources and any conflicting information to afford yourself with an unbiased and more credible entirety of a given issue or event. Please do enlighten us which bombshells of misinformation did the experienced journalists "fall for", they couldn't have been that experienced if they failed to check a source. Does this mean that wiki is unreliable, no it means that just like any other source of information it needs to be cross referenced from multiple sources to ensure the individual articles credibility. I assert that as a source of information wiki is a good starting point. No single source of information should ever be taken as an complete and authoritative on any issue as it has been wrote by people and we all know how devious and manipulative people can be especially with "facts".here are a few interesting facts and you can use a pc in a library to varify them yourself I am certain you will not find them in a book in a library.On september 11th 2001 the bbc news broadcast from nyc about the collapse of building 7 20 minutes before it happened, Subsequent interviews with the owner Mr Silverstein explains how he received a call from nyfd "I remember getting a call from the, er, fire department commander, telling me that they were not sure they were gonna be able to contain the fire. I said, "We've had such terrible loss of life, maybe the smartest thing to do is pull it." And they made that decision to pull and we watched the building collapse.You can google it yourself the owner of the building admits to nyc making the descision to pull the building a demolition term for making it collapse in on itself, fortunately the building had been evacuted and no loss of life was caused in that but it just goes to show that without the internet the truth would be buried. Believe me there are a multitude of sources for this story.Which is why media companies are working hard together with governments to ensure that the web is censored and closed the idea of a media wall is for example a cable tv provider called oracle tv would allow unlimited access to all of its approved content and you would have to pay per mb to have unlimited access to web content. Libraries are easier to control even today there are a list of Banned books, and it is almost impossible to Ban or censor anything completely on the internet."Which, again, sums up why books are still necessary. People can take advantage of chaos and tragedy to advance their marginal viewpoints by publishing any old rubbish on the internet, and then change it the next day when called on it to hide their lack of knowledge. Case in point, it isn't "NYFD" it's FDNY. Seems like a small thing, but it shows a lack of real knowledge of the issue. Harder to get away with in print. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:12:10 GMT+1 shakygorilla http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=88#comment387 This is a redundant question really as the decision has already been made to phase them out. Hence the rubbish selection of books and services. Staff cuts are being made all over the country. This has been going on for some years."New figures from the Government" Ha. They are preparing us for the loss.I believe it will be a huge loss but the fact is, a literate working class is no longer needed. So why pay for it.The fact that the whole society gains from a literate population now seems to be irrelevant. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:10:22 GMT+1 Terry-Yaki http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=87#comment386 "84. At 12:43pm on 24 Aug 2010, J Valentine wrote:I've had no use for my local libraries (two or three) for many years now. Any fiction I care to read can be bought fairly cheaply from tesco/sainsburys (and I don't have to worry about it getting a bit battered), or downloaded from the internet to read on my laptop.More to the point, as a university student, I need somewhat specialized texts, and no local library has a single one. No surprise, as Geology isn't a massively popular subject... As such the only library I use is the one on my uni campus. It holds no fiction whatsoever, and I've never seen it empty in two years!"This probably says quite a lot about why we need libraries. If we want to become a nation who thinks Andre Agasse's autobiography is the culmination of literary achievement, by all means scrap them and let people buy their books from Tescos. Katz in Bedford (382) You said what I was thinking. There is no real substitute for books, and no real substitute for a free public library. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:02:08 GMT+1 Terry-Yaki http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=87#comment385 "84. At 12:43pm on 24 Aug 2010, J Valentine wrote:I've had no use for my local libraries (two or three) for many years now. Any fiction I care to read can be bought fairly cheaply from tesco/sainsburys (and I don't have to worry about it getting a bit battered), or downloaded from the internet to read on my laptop.More to the point, as a university student, I need somewhat specialized texts, and no local library has a single one. No surprise, as Geology isn't a massively popular subject... As such the only library I use is the one on my uni campus. It holds no fiction whatsoever, and I've never seen it empty in two years!"This probably says quite a lot about why we need libraries. If we want to become a nation who thinks Andre Agasse's autobiography is the culmination of literary achievement, by all means scrap them and let people buy their books from Tescos. Katz in Bedford (382) You said what I was thinking. There is no real substitute for books, and no real substitute for a free public library. Wed 25 Aug 2010 16:00:56 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=87#comment384 309. At 11:40pm on 24 Aug 2010, 2squirrels wrote: ...If everybody read more books our language would be spoken more correctly and children would spell and understand much more easily. Throw away books like Shakepeare and large works of peotry at your peril - humanity needs them.--------------------------------------Libraries never were the centre of communities, that was in public houses. Large and small works of poetry are already discarded. Children do not read it unless forced by teachers in order to pass exams. Like-wise Shakespeare. Incidentally, do you recommend 'books like Shakespeare' from personal acquaintance? As far as is known,he never wrote a book? Wed 25 Aug 2010 14:56:24 GMT+1 Khuli http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=87#comment383 "372. At 1:24pm on 25 Aug 2010, Three Million Posse On Employed In A Dub wrote:Could anyone out there tell me what this song sounds like or whether it is politically apt for this next round of govern mental bleeding edge cuts which penalise the poor and suck up to their rich corporate common purpose paymasters by the sold out LIBCON coalition political hypocritical no morality losers*(*) = This recycled charity donated Pooter I'm using ain't got no sound card and the internet cafe site requires Adobe Flash Palayer and a browser with Java Script enabled whatever that Techie gobblygook means--------------------------I'm betting it wasn't the 'poor' that donated your charity computer...Perhaps you should spend more time in the libraries - they might stay open and you would learn what the 'gobblygook' means. Wed 25 Aug 2010 14:23:10 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=87#comment382 371. At 1:14pm on 25 Aug 2010, ipswichred wrote:Libraries in Suffolk are a vibrant place to spend time. There are a lot of negative comments on this discussion board. Doesn't your library play music, have children's groups & activites, supply access to the internet, provide CDs, DVDs, books, magazines, reference works etc? Well ours do!Libraries are a store of knowledge of some of the greatest minds that have ever lived. Libraries should be celebrated and cherished.Libraries v non-doms and rich tax avoiders?NO BRAINER------------------------------------------What you describe-children's groups, 'activities', magazines and music- sounds like a cross between a 'palace of varieties' and a music retail chainstore. It seems an alien environment in which to sample the works of 'the greatest minds who have ever lived' some of which are a difficult read and not 'entertaining' at all. How many of your cool 'clientele' bother with that old 'window dressing'? Despite all this progressive spending and record exam results every year' illiteracy in the UK is actually rising and thus claims made for libraries as essential for educational resources are not demonstrated. Clearly from these posts public access to good books is loosing the battle for 'bums on seats'. Hence all the talk of associating libraries with undemanding activities like drinking or shopping. It is immoral to fund entertainment,whether it be Covent Garden opera for the rich or so-called 'libraries' for others by extorting 'tax' money from the many who cannot (Grand Opera) or do not use them. If these things are such good entertainment, you pay for them but count me out please, NO BRAINER, leave me out. Wed 25 Aug 2010 14:22:20 GMT+1 Katz_in_Bedford http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=86#comment381 217. Roy - recommend this post. I read mostly for pleasure, rather than research or increasing or expanding my knowledge. I do so on a daily basis for anything from 1-3 hours and get through a vast amount of books - something like 40 so far this year. This is very much outside of my full time job in IT which necessitates being glued to a PC for 8 or 9 hours a day. Whilst I do have a PC at home with broadband access, I use it mostly for disposing of my excess ‘stuff’ (and acquiring more stuff!) from eBay, keeping in touch with friends via email and researching best value when making larger purchases. Any more academic research I do via the internet is generally work-related and done during working hours!Reading for pleasure for me is very much associated with real-life books in paper format (hard or soft back). I’ve had a deep love of the written word from a very young age when my parents routinely read to me and my sisters as part of our bedtime routine. By 3 years of age, I was following what they were reading with my finger along the page and by 4 was able to read pretty fluently. I got my first library card before I started school and had read pretty much everything in the infants area of my local library (North Watford) within a year, then moved on to the older children’s section and devoured that at the rate of four books a week over the next four years. Progression to the adult library was not usually granted until 14 years of age, but as I’d exhausted the children’s section at 10, I was allowed to move up and loved the fact I could now have six books a week! Plus access to the vast reference section covering art, travel, history and all manner of other things that I loved to spend time browsing through while Mum was doing the weekly shopping. I worked my way through the non-fiction section alphabetically by author, which was how the library was organised and was competent at finding things I was looking for in the card index system located in several drawers just before the booking in/out area after asking one of the librarians how it all worked at the age of 12. The reading room was a bit of a mystery to me as it seemed, to a small child, to be a place full of rather frightening elderly men encased in enormous newspapers! Perhaps that’s why I don’t really care for newspapers much to this day! Moving to secondary school gave me a whole new library! My school had a fabulous library of fiction and non-fiction, allowing me access to even more books each week! My first English lesson at secondary school was with the librarian who gave us a lesson in the Dewey system then set all sorts of tasks to locate items so we could all learn the practical application. English lessons frequently involved reading a book out loud around the class, even through to O level study for English Literature. Does this still happen, I wonder?Books were then, and still are, a wondrous source of escape. I love building up a picture of what the characters and places look like from the author’s description. There’s been many a time when I’ve read a book cover to cover in one sitting as the story gripped my attention so much. I see all books as acquaintances (many of whom I’ve not met yet) and many are friends that I’ve loved, even if fleetingly. I’m sure that my love of reading helped me throughout my school days and has certainly not hindered me since. Without books, my world would definitely be very much poorer. Both my parents read avidly (my Dad still does at 78) and that’s definitely rubbed off on me and my sisters. Using a library as children certainly wasn’t because my parents were too lazy to provide books – more that they couldn’t keep up with the demand for books that three children with vastly different tastes placed upon them!Some years later, I lived next door to the library in Christchurch and took my friend’s little girl, aged 4, in on a very wet Saturday morning when it was too nasty to go to the park. She’d never seen, never mind read, a book and was a bit in awe at first. After an hour of picking out books from vast boxes and sitting down with her to read them on brightly coloured bean bags, she was hooked and frequently requested a repeat visit whenever she came to see me!I had stopped using libraries for many years due to work commitments, but found myself in my local library in Bedford earlier this year when my home PC died on me when I was out of work and I needed access to one urgently to research a company for an interview! I promptly joined and found them still to be the welcoming place I remembered. My current working hours make it impossible to get there during the week, but they are open until 4pm on a Saturday, so I make time then. They still offer a huge range of reading matter for all manner of purposes and I’m sure I wouldn’t have such an eclectic taste in reading had it not been for my introduction to them at an early age. I do have a collection of books at home that I own: largely reference books from my days gaining a post graduate diploma in industrial relations many years after leaving school; plus a growing collection of poetry and children’s books from my childhood. The latter have mostly been acquired from library sales of books that somehow don’t seem to find favour with children today, but have been lent out to friends’ children on occasion and always met with a favourable response. I do buy the 3 for £5 novels to feed my avarice but pretty much ignore the ‘chick-lit’ that the supermarkets seem to stock. I don’t ‘get’ the current fascination with celebrity and have never read and doubt I ever will read a celebrity biography, though I have read Tony Benn’s diaries. My problem with buying novels is that I get through them at such a rate of knots that I’ve always got piles of them acting as doorstops around my house and have recently discovered that charity shops are no longer as grateful for donations of them as they have difficulty in shifting books on! I will certainly ask my library if they can accept donations. I simply don’t have the space to store all the books I have read or the ones I’ve yet to discover!Libraries are an amazing resource and one of the things my council tax gets spent on that I don’t begrudge one penny of. I feel that far from considering closing libraries, we should be looking at ways of making them more accessible to a wider range of people through different or more extended opening hours and perhaps offering a wider range of facilities to get more people interested in reading once again, such as literacy classes, targeted reading lists based on an individual’s interests (a bit like a personal shopper), book or poetry readings (and not just during the day) as starters. I’m certainly going to speak to the librarians at my local library this Saturday to see if there’s anything I could help with – I’d be quite happy to volunteer some of my time if that would help. I’d really love the opportunity to pass on even a small part of my love for books and reading to others.On a slight tangent, whenever the question of giving up work / retirement crops up, many people say to me they’d be bored. I always respond that there are far too many books I’ve not yet read for me to ever get bored! Wed 25 Aug 2010 14:13:45 GMT+1 AndyC555 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=86#comment380 Perhaps we need the help of Conan The Librarian? Wed 25 Aug 2010 13:59:42 GMT+1 Janie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=86#comment379 I would really miss the use of my local library if it was to close. I use it not only for reading fiction (and all those people buying every book they read - not very environmentally friendly is it?) Plus you obviously don't read as many books as I do because where on earth would you keep them all! Admittedley I don't use the library for factual literature as the internet is more up to date. But as a scientist (PhD) who doesn't have the internet at home the computers available at the library are at times a life line to me.SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL LIBRARY !!!!!! Wed 25 Aug 2010 13:54:00 GMT+1 arunmehta http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=86#comment378 Libraries local or community can still play a role if they provide free internet facility and perhaps a coffee shop added as a added incentive.Internet being the single biggest threat to library usage,labraries can diversify into a DVD/music library with free access to e resources for research. Wed 25 Aug 2010 13:50:25 GMT+1 Ralphie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=85#comment377 353. At 11:49am on 25 Aug 2010, GUNGHOBUNGADIER wrote:At 11:32am on 25 Aug 2010, Wolfgang Semmelrogge wrote:Many of the posters on here ranting and raving obviously have to much time on their hands. They should us that time to go to a library and read a book. It might calm them down a little and educate them a bit. They could do with both.See you there then Wolfgang, by the way, don't pass over "English Made Easy", it is an excellent publication and illustrates to correct spelling of "too" in its quantative form. ///Why, does it have a chapter on how to avoid typos? But thanks for proving at least the "calm down" part of my post. Btw, I missed an "e" in "use" as well. Wed 25 Aug 2010 13:22:29 GMT+1 in_the_uk http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=85#comment376 368. At 1:04pm on 25 Aug 2010, Artemesia wrote:340. At 10:25am on 25 Aug 2010, in_the_uk wrote:"...When all 3 of the top parties are saying we are skint there must be something in it...The country is skint. If we paid off the debt we would pay higher tax and get a lot fewer public services...."I have not heard anyone from any Party suggest that we are skint (ie bankrupt)What is being said is that if we don't cut back on spending, then at some point in the future, we will be skintBy the way, there is a difference between the annual budgetary deficit and the on-going national debt-------------------------Thank you for the explanation. Still we have no money for all these services so people should stop complaining. The point of my post has still not changed Wed 25 Aug 2010 13:19:23 GMT+1 1stTopic http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=85#comment375 It may be depend on which libraries you look at, my small local library always has a number people browsing and I personally visit twice a week I would certainly miss it if it were to close, Library in a supermarket with screaming kids etc no thanks. Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:47:25 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=85#comment374 312. At 00:37am on 25 Aug 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:270. At 7:45pm on 24 Aug 2010, RTFishall wrote:If the libraries close, where will the old folk who can't afford to heat their homes in winter go? Maybe they could burn the books that are no longer needed or alternatively they could claim the Winter Fuel Payment.http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Pensionsandretirementplanning/Benefits/BenefitsInRetirement/DG_10018657-------------------------------------------------Wonderful idea! The number of HYS complaining that libraries may close don't actually want a traditional library with its educational purpose. They want a creche, a meeting place for gossiping, a coffee shop, an advice centre for reassurance or a daytime refuge for 'coffin dodgers'. About Winter Fuel Payments, can I still claim if I move to Saudi Arabia? Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:33:06 GMT+1 glittergal4091 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=84#comment373 The library in Norwich is lovely, and everyone works really hard to keep it vibrant and up to date. There's a Pizza Express in it, as well as BBC studios and temporary exhibitions, arts and crafts stalls etc. The library itself is well equipped, with lots of internet connected PCs, catalogues, sound and vision facilities and of course, books. It also has decent opening hours and, I believe, closes at 8pm most days. My only niggle is that the range of books can be limited, apparent when I was looking for specific books. The only thing that can be done to solve this is to request books, which you can do. I'm proud if the library and hope many people continue to use it as they do now - books, internet, finding a job, coffee and as a meeting place. Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:28:12 GMT+1 reflector2 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=84#comment372 • 2. At 10:33am on 24 Aug 2010, David Horton wrote: Not only that, but as an avid PDA reader, the day of the library is passing.This myth that it is still the vibrant hub of the community needs to be stilled.We are facing an era of unprecedented cust in Public Spending. The axe should fall squarely on the library and all other minority use establishments. If you want it, you pay for it.Complain about this comment• 3. At 10:44am on 24 Aug 2010, Billy wrote: For people conducting research projects, the average town library is pretty useless - you are better off using a combination university libraries and the internet.For literature, the relative cost of books these days is so cheap people just buy them instead of borrowing - My wife took 8 books on our last holiday and left 6 of them behind!• 123. At 1:43pm on 24 Aug 2010, AndyS wrote: Give it roughly 20 years and then there will be absolutely no use for libraries. Also, the argument of trying to get some of our elderly citizens on the net will not be needed as most by then will be in some way or other already online. In fact paper itself will not be used so widely as it is now. Same goes for CD's, newspapers, magazines etc. etc. etc.……………………………………………………………In answer to the first comment: It is the vibrant hub of my community. If your PDA is the vibrant hub of yours, bit sad really!? Also, we do want it and we do pay for it as part of our taxes! If you do not want to use it then shut up! Oh, and please keep out with your mobile gadgets (most irritating), just pose with them outside the local coffee shop!!In answer to the second comment: Most libraries have a reference section, they also computers for free online use. The remark ‘relatively cheap’ may be OK on your income, but not on most! Borrowing a book also means it is used far more that your wife’s ‘left books’, would you not agree? Oh, and how many books have YOU read lately??In answer to the third comment: Is that so AndyS, if you are so sure of the future, will there be any use of you laddie?? Or will you just be a head with a screen attached to the front of it, a bit like where David Horton is going??? Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:27:06 GMT+1 Three Million Posse On Employed In A Dub http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=84#comment371 Could anyone out there tell me what this song sounds like or whether it is politically apt for this next round of govern mental bleeding edge cuts which penalise the poor and suck up to their rich corporate common purpose paymasters by the sold out LIBCON coalition political hypocritical no morality losers*Kaiser Chiefs - I Predict A Riot http://www.muzu.tv/kaiserchiefs/i-predict-a-riot-music-video/253244?country=gb(*) = This recycled charity donated Pooter I'm using ain't got no sound card and the internet cafe site requires Adobe Flash Palayer and a browser with Java Script enabled whatever that Techie gobblygook means Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:24:18 GMT+1 Orwell Boy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=84#comment370 Libraries in Suffolk are a vibrant place to spend time. There are a lot of negative comments on this discussion board. Doesn't your library play music, have children's groups & activites, supply access to the internet, provide CDs, DVDs, books, magazines, reference works etc? Well ours do!Libraries are a store of knowledge of some of the greatest minds that have ever lived. Libraries should be celebrated and cherished.Libraries v non-doms and rich tax avoiders?NO BRAINER Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:14:49 GMT+1 uptotherewithit http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=84#comment369 Libraries need to move to include more electronic books and embrace new technologies if they are to thrive.People still love to read but there are a lot of different sources nowadays. Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:10:50 GMT+1 Rupert Smyth http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=83#comment368 Attention all lefties!!!Get down to your local library and join immediately then when it closes you will be able to criticise the government for closing down a valued resource much used by the local community. At the moment they are places that hardly anybody ever goes into which does not offer much scope for an HYS moan and means the government might very well have a good argument for closing them. Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:06:52 GMT+1 Artemesia http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=83#comment367 340. At 10:25am on 25 Aug 2010, in_the_uk wrote:"...When all 3 of the top parties are saying we are skint there must be something in it...The country is skint. If we paid off the debt we would pay higher tax and get a lot fewer public services...."I have not heard anyone from any Party suggest that we are skint (ie bankrupt)What is being said is that if we don't cut back on spending, then at some point in the future, we will be skint By the way, there is a difference between the annual budgetary deficit and the on-going national debt Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:04:34 GMT+1 in_the_uk http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=83#comment366 357. At 12:17pm on 25 Aug 2010, the_Sluiceterer wrote:Actually .........The large UK banks (as other countries) invested billions in the USA and Lost. Obviously the super rich bankers are not allowed to lose & so Joe-public is given the rhetoric of a credit squeeze and made to pay it back. Obviously the super rich bankers are now making billions again, paying themselves large bonuses & have no intention of paying back the gov`t OR giving Joe-public a better service. Any other country would have a revolution. The UK obviously wants more of the same .....Tories to take control, higher interest rates, more profits for the City, cut public services (libraries etc) & ensure further poverty for the majority. Marvellous. Luckily I now live abroad.-------------------------And if we didnt bail out the banks (and own a large portion of them) we would have NO money to withdraw from the cash machines. The money didnt exist. It was lost. So either way you would bail out the banks. Either with tax money, or with any savings you think you had.Yet the reason this could happen was due to a lack of regulation on the banks. Go 13 years of labour and no attempt to stop them (they actually aided the banks to take risks).As for blaming tories for high interest rates, WE ARE IN RECESSION! Not tories fault. the banks would do it regardless of who is in power. Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:02:46 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=83#comment365 354. At 12:01pm on 25 Aug 2010, EdwinaTS wrote:Libraries should become exhibition centres for books & information sources, open at times people are available, and open as study centres for people whose homes are unsuitable. A 24 hour open policy would be great. It would make good use of this public asset. However, it should do so without increasing harm to the environment which means turning the thermostats right down.----------------------------'Turning the thermostats right down'(!). Madam, the 'Library' is a traditional resting place of British Vagrants who, providing they do not snore too loudly, have always been welcome at the 'reading' tables before 'Day Care' centres were even thought of. Exposing them to winter temperatures from which they have escaped is as harsh as banning from the library, the consumption of fast food, the selling of drugs or screaming children that run around too much. Get rid of the books by all means but please leave the thermostats full on! Wed 25 Aug 2010 12:00:21 GMT+1 bbcpod http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=82#comment364 @David Horton, #288 - thanks, it's a pleasure trading opinions with you ;D Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:59:04 GMT+1 Rupert Smyth http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=82#comment363 # 338. At 10:16am on 25 Aug 2010, MrWonderfulReality wrote:Evey time I click to publish a comment, a box with "you already stated that in 1st comment" appears,# 339. At 10:17am on 25 Aug 2010, MrWonderfulReality wrote:Evey time I click to publish a comment, a box with "you already said that in comment 1" appears,---------------------------------------------Could this be because you are repeating yourself?Could this be because you are repeating yourself? Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:57:30 GMT+1 Worldcitizen1 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=82#comment362 Do libraries have a future?Our city spent millions renovating one of the main Libraries here. A new addition was added too. I go to this Library maybe 5 times a year on average. When I go, I notice that the majority of the patrons are younger people who, for some reason, find the Library's computers to be the main attraction. Rarely do I notice anyone actually reading a book even though there are very nice looking and comfortable seating within large rooms, complete with fireplaces and crystal chandeliers. Barnes and Nobles, an excellent source for reading materials, had an outlet within one our city's supermarkets. It is no longer there as there was simply not enough business. The Supermarket itself is still thriving though. I can't see how the addition of a library would change things when considering that. Like most shoppers, I like to get my groceries and bring them home as quickly as possible. I have my mind on what I am buying food-wise and so the idea of purchasing or borrowing a book does not enter my mind. I consider myself to be an avid reader too. Our household receives at least two dozen various magazines every month and our Postal carrier has mentioned that we get more delivered than anyone else on his route. The tone in his voice indicated that he wasn't too thrilled about it either.As far as installing a library in one of our local bars ("pubs"), I can safely write that I believe that this idea would not work in our city. To be perfectly honest, despite my first attempt to get this point across and having it "referred", people go to the bars for reasons other than to read. Also, after a few drinks, how well can one read a book? Think about that. I know that in Canada and Paris, there are such quaint little establishments which offer wine along with reading material but, these places don't get the traffic that would keep them open elsewhere, especially here in the States. Perhaps things are different in the U.K.I don't believe those suggestions offered would work here.Younger people need to be taught at an EARLY age that reading is important and that books can be a great source of inspiration and knowledge. It opens the reader's mind to different paths and roads less traveled. It allows the reader to be in the shoes of another human being to see things from their point of view. It is quite an experience and quite an insighful understanding of how different people view the same events or events that are not normaly encountered by most. It is fascinating. It can help the reader understand the "hows" and "whys" of human behavior too.How do teachers get that message across to the younger generation though?That seems to be the real issue here. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:54:57 GMT+1 Worldcitizen1 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=82#comment361 Do libraries have a future?Our city spent millions renovating one of the main Libraries here. A new addition was added too. I go to this Library maybe 5 times a year on average. When I go, I notice that the majority of the patrons are younger people who, for some reason, find the Library's computers to be the main attraction. Rarely do I notice anyone actually reading a book even though there are very nice looking and comfortable seating within large rooms, complete with fireplaces and crystal chandeliers. Barnes and Nobles, an excellent source for reading materials, had an outlet within one our city's supermarkets. It is no longer there as there was simply not enough business. The Supermarket itself is still thriving though. I can't see how the addition of a library would change things when considering that. Like most shoppers, I like to get my groceries and bring them home as quickly as possible. I have my mind on what I am buying food-wise and so the idea of purchasing or borrowing a book does not enter my mind. I consider myself to be an avid reader too. Our household receives at least two dozen various magazines every month and our Postal carrier has mentioned that we get more delivered than anyone else on his route. The tone in his voice indicated that he wasn't too thrilled about it either.As far as installing a library in one of our local bars ("pubs"), I can safely write that I believe that this idea would not work in our city. To be perfectly honest, despite my first attempt to get this point across and having it "referred", people go to the bars for reasons other than to read. Also, after a few drinks, how well can one read a book? Think about that. I know that in Canada and Paris, there are such quaint little establishments which offer wine along with reading material but, these places don't get the traffic that would keep them open elsewhere, especially here in the States. Perhaps things are different in the U.K.I don't believe those suggestions offered would work here.Younger people need to be taught at an EARLY age that reading is important and that books can be a great source of inspiration and knowledge. It opens the reader's mind to different paths and roads less traveled. It allows the reader to be in the shoes of another human being to see things from their point of view. It is quite an experience and quite an insighful understanding of how different people view the same events or events that are not normaly encountered by most. It is fascinating. It can help the reader understand the "hows" and "whys" of human behavior too.How do teachers get that message across to the younger generation though?That seems to be the real issue here. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:52:53 GMT+1 George http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=82#comment360 This argument has been doing the rounds for years and for some reason local councils are still inept as finding solutions. Probably because they force the imagination out of their employees rather than foster it, and they use recruitment profiling to employ extrovert talkers in preference to introvert thinkers. Then they employ expensive consultants to do the thinking..mad or what? (My council once employed consultants to investigate and change how staff printed documents from their pc's...rather than asking staff for their views, it's not rocket surgery is it?)Back to Libraries:The facts include, 1. Many libraries occupy prime sites in cities, towns or villages. 2. libraries are usually open while most people are at work and closed when they are at home. 3. Libraries don’t tend to use their space to do anything but display books and media.There seem to be a few solutions:1. Sell off the libraries and bank the cash. This is probably the 'hidden' aim.2. Stay open at times that suit customers not times that suit the employees [but this is a British Disease common in all industries and on all high streets and industrial parks].3. Share the library space with other businesses, e.g. book stores, banks, estate agents, game shops, music shops.4. Use technology to move towards e-lending of e-books5. Don’t take up shelf space with real books just use computer terminals [home or in the library] and perhaps a scan of the cover and some other pages as 'Amazon' do.6. Set up libraries in department stores and supermarkets.I'm sure there are many other solutions but the future of the library has never been so bright, we just have to change the paradigm of service delivery.If I was a consultant I would have charged your local council £ thousands for that advice and laughingly they would have paid it as they have no imagination to do anything else. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:42:35 GMT+1 bbcpod http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=81#comment359 Thought I'd add something about e-books: I buy these for students using our university library, and we do plenty to promote their usage. They are invaluable for providing access to popular texts and enable students to use them at home or work. However, I think you need to understand that (some) publishers are scared of losing money. An e-book available for a Kindle through Amazon might cost £10, but that same e-book (should the publisher decide to make it available for library purchase in the first place) could cost £260.This is a real example. They can be prohibitively expensive. Publishers don't want to sell one ebook accessed by multiple users, when they could sell multiple copies (e- or otherwise) to individuals. What's more, academic research databases are very expensive - the university buys them but licencing usually does not allow us to open them up to the public users of our library. So if you want to put pressure on anyone, maybe we should all start with the publishers of books and journals? Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:38:17 GMT+1 Sachidananda Narayanan http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=81#comment358 8. At 11:01am on 24 Aug 2010, Max wrote:Libraries appear to be another British institution that many people love, but hardly anyone uses anymore. Should we collectively fund something that cannot justify its usefulness?I say this sadly as a fan of libraries...---------------------------------------------------------------------Replace "libraries" with the word "Churches".For knowledge and wisdom, both are very useful.As e-books took over libraries and search engines feed more information than type faces reveal in lithographic details, the god supreme in His most gracious RGB pixel dot formation can be caged in an idiot box for us to make do a Sunday in Holy Sermons!It may be too late for the West to know what I said. Come to India and just switch on the TV and ruffle thru the channels in the mornings to know how we pray to god seeing Him thru the idiot box. If it is libraries you worry on a legitimate care to preserve, our thousands and hundreds of years old archetectural marvels in temples and abodes of gods in monestries are becoming Wrold Heritage Centers and relics to remind us of our nostelgic proud past.So dear Max, congratulations in advance for a HYS debate soon to be,"Do Churches have a future?"-C. Sachidananda Narayanan, a sad fan for libraries, Churches and Temples. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:37:41 GMT+1 freegreenlondon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=81#comment357 I go to my local library several times a week and usually have about 5 library books at home at any one time, plus books borrowed for my toddler.Would you be more likely to visit your library if it was in a pub or supermarket? Definitely notWhere else would you like to see a library? The only other place that might work for me would be in a community centre.Should there be more mobile libraries? For areas where there is no library, and people who are housebound, yes.How can we encourage more people to use their library?Let them know that they can borrow the latest bestselling books for free, and latest films/tv shows on DVD for a small charge.I've always loved libraries, since I was a child. The sheer potential of so many (free) books... And since becoming a mother in 2008, I've found that our local library is a fantastic resource and place for activities for mothers of babies and toddlers - Baby Rhyme Time was a great way to meet other mothers and babies during my son's first year. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:23:37 GMT+1 the_Sluiceterer http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=81#comment356 334. At 09:48am on 25 Aug 2010, in_the_uk wrote:There is no money. All the tax money you pay now is for the services you used under labour. They were living off credit only and threatened worse cuts than thatcher. How can you blame the tories when they were left a bankrupt country and nothing to pay it off with?======================================================Actually .........The large UK banks (as other countries) invested billions in the USA and Lost. Obviously the super rich bankers are not allowed to lose & so Joe-public is given the rhetoric of a credit squeeze and made to pay it back. Obviously the super rich bankers are now making billions again, paying themselves large bonuses & have no intention of paying back the gov`t OR giving Joe-public a better service. Any other country would have a revolution. The UK obviously wants more of the same .....Tories to take control, higher interest rates, more profits for the City, cut public services (libraries etc) & ensure further poverty for the majority. Marvellous. Luckily I now live abroad. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:17:17 GMT+1 Roddyrhino http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=80#comment355 Having been an avid reader since primary school, I use my local library on a weekly basis. I can always find plenty to interest me - not only books, but also a wide range of CDs and DVDs. I can use the online catalogue to search for items I want and reserve them, as well as being able to renew online. There is a branch close to where I work and another near my home - and whenever I go to either, there are always plenty of others making the most of the facilities. To lose these libraries would be a major loss, not just to me but to many other people as well.Oh, and I might add that the staff are always friendly and knowledgeable, too. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:14:14 GMT+1 OddBoy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=80#comment354 The library is a pretty essential public service...and one of the few left that actually counts as one. People moaning about the price of public transport should realise that it is not public...it is privately owned and you now pay through the nose for the privilege of using it. The spending cuts are absurd and attack everything that makes life halfway bearable...people must realise and wake up to the fact that they are an attack on the poor, who have been forced to bear the brunt, and even the blame for this "crisis." It is maddening to read the self-important, self centred and ignorant views of people who feel that libraries and other publicly funded services are a burden on society...or "non-essential." Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:12:37 GMT+1 EdwinaTS http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=80#comment353 Libraries should become exhibition centres for books & information sources, open at times people are available, and open as study centres for people whose homes are unsuitable. A 24 hour open policy would be great. It would make good use of this public asset. However, it should do so without increasing harm to the environment which means turning the thermostats right down. Wed 25 Aug 2010 11:01:13 GMT+1 GUNGHOBUNGADIER http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=80#comment352 At 11:32am on 25 Aug 2010, Wolfgang Semmelrogge wrote:Many of the posters on here ranting and raving obviously have to much time on their hands. They should us that time to go to a library and read a book. It might calm them down a little and educate them a bit. They could do with both.See you there then Wolfgang, by the way, don't pass over "English Made Easy", it is an excellent publication and illustrates to correct spelling of "too" in its quantative form. Wed 25 Aug 2010 10:49:57 GMT+1 NewSuspect-Smith http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=79#comment351 266. At 7:22pm on 24 Aug 2010, yeahbutnobutyeah wrote:264. At 6:56pm on 24 Aug 2010, NewSuspect-Smith wrote:-----------------------------------------------------For science subjects, university libraries are out of date. Textbooks are not useful sources of reference as journals are and are expensive and out of date within five years of publication. Most cling to the shelves and spend years unexamined before being discarded. They should never have been bought in the first place. .......I have heard one librarian complain that his budget is eaten up buying trash romances for the elderly 'hard of thinking'. Public libraries are too often places for dumping children where they can scream and shout as much as they like whilst parents shop. They are a waste of time and a sorry waste of paper.-->What a shortsighted view! Older text books reflect earlier ideas and represent the history of science. They should be preserved, not thrown out. If we followed your line of reasoning, we would have thrown out the writings of all the great writers of the past. The latest theories of science are not necessarily right - many times theories from the past have be resurrected!And why shouldn't older people read 'trashy' novels? It may help their minds stay active and it may be all they can manage if they are suffering from some form of dementia.------------------------------------------------------ 'The Origin of Species' et al. were not preserved for us by university libraries. Older textbooks do convey, at first hand, the history of science.I collect them for that reason and authors such as Darwin, Haldane and Darlinton are a fascinating 'historical' read. But they were not bought as aids to understanding history but as statements of 'modern science'. There is no need to equip every university library with books that will not and do not serve the purpose for which they are purchased. To do so is like refusing to incinerate waste because rubbish tips will be invaluable aids to future archaeologists or even, creating a space program in order to make non-stick frying pans. Nearly all texts are unoriginal derivatives of then-current ideas of subjects that are better covered by reviews in journals. I am an 'older' person and therefor do not feel sorry for, nor sentimentalise the elderly. I have reason to doubt that my mind, or any other, would be kept active by reading novels, trashy or otherwise. Wed 25 Aug 2010 10:47:38 GMT+1 Ralphie http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=79#comment350 Many of the posters on here ranting and raving obviously have to much time on their hands. They should us that time to go to a library and read a book. It might calm them down a little and educate them a bit. They could do with both. Wed 25 Aug 2010 10:32:12 GMT+1 I_amStGeorge http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=79#comment349 It is a sad fact of life but the life of libraries is in its autumn years All the home taught hobbies are on the decline as more and more we are swamped with technology. Needlework, home weaving and rug making All disappearing into history along with the comfort factor they generated. There is no way to revive them as some books are made straight to film nowadays and the attention span of a modern person can be measured in minutes rather than hours. on top of that grammar and literature are practically non exsistant thanks to the invention of the computer. Slowly we are all being drawn into a big melting pot and will all be the same in years to come. no culture, characteristics, language or brain activity and all for the sake of profit taught to us by our academic masters, makes you wonder just how clever our intellectuals really are Wed 25 Aug 2010 10:05:42 GMT+1 MaxMax http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=79#comment348 I think libraries are essential and a dedicated library serving local people is a must. I don't know how this research was conducted, but all the libraries near me are always busy. Libraries provide a good source for learning and resources to find those books that are too expensive to buy. From what I have seen, everyone uses a library and the invaluable service it provides is not something that should be cut !!! I think this is another cost cutting exercise from this Conservative/LibDem government. Another bad idea from this out-of-touch government. I think it's time we cut all MPs salaries and expenses by 50%. I would like to see taxes spent on public services not on inflated MPs salaries and expenses. I guess that would never happen as it is not in this Con/LibDem government's interest to do that. Right? Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:58:33 GMT+1 smilingparrotfan http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=79#comment347 #339 Mr. Wonderful....Yes, everything I try a post a comment I too get a message that I've already said that in comment 1 !!! Blip, I suppose. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:50:50 GMT+1 adelaide http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=78#comment346 I use my library regularly and i am very annoyed that more is invested in computers rather than books. Libraries are brilliant for quiet research and study. The librarian really helps you to search through the amount of rubbish that is on the internet and shows you how to identify good information. Librarians also show you how to use the information you find in books and journals and gives lots of advice on research techniques and skills. Whilst doing my degree my librarian was a godsend.I do not want to go into pubs to get books. What a pathetic idea!! Can you imagine your grandmother in the local pub at lunchtime!!? Or your children hanging around the pub with the swearing drunks!!! Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:48:44 GMT+1 GUNGHOBUNGADIER http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=78#comment345 LIBRARY ??? Ah yes, of course, that is where they used to stock and lend books of all sorts. My nearest town used to have one but it was converted into a creche for those young enough not to have learnt to read and a playground for older unruly noisy children born of failed parents who, themselves, never read about consideration for others. The few scant "books" it stocks are obviously targeted for the beano brained who enjoy playing luck dip. I completely support the closure of such public libraries in times of necessary cutbacks and hope for a return of fee paying private librarys operating with traditional discipline. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:45:29 GMT+1 BrimfulOfAshes http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=78#comment344 It's no surprise to me that the number of adults using libraries has fallen, while the number of children using them has gone up.Libraries these days are little more than rowdy creches full of little darlings running about, making a racket and rendering it impossible for adults - whose taxes pay for the things - to enjoy them in peace.But of course, the old 'silence' rule that made libaries such tranquil havens can't be imposed any more. Because, as we all know, these days it's only kids who matter. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:44:07 GMT+1 TracyJane-S http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=78#comment343 I know the government HAS to find savings somewhere but I have to write in support of my local library.I am lucky to have a really good library in Taunton. I know I didn't visit a library much in my early adult years - too much work and no time to play! But now I have children I see the local library as so important. The person who said that you don't need to read to get on in life, noting David Beckams success, i feel is sadly misguided - not all of us are built to be great sports personalities and very few people actually reach that sort of status in sport. I have two young boys and am really keen to encourage them to read as I think it will give them a head start in life.My 8 year old son loves reading, both story books and information books. My younger son is not quite so keen to read but he still loves looking at books. They can get through up to 10 books a week between them and there is no way I can keep up with that through buying books.I don't visit the library every week as they allow us to borrow about 20 books on each ticket. We are also able to renew books on line so if I can't get in on time there doesn't have to be a fine!I would encourage every parent to get down to their library - if you can't find what you want then I find the staff are really helpful. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:44:02 GMT+1 freegreenlondon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=77#comment342 I go to my local library several times a week and usually have about 5 library books at home at any one time, plus books borrowed for my toddler.Would you be more likely to visit your library if it was in a pub or supermarket? Definitely notWhere else would you like to see a library? The only other place that might work for me would be in a community centre.Should there be more mobile libraries? For areas where there is no library, and people who are housebound, yes.How can we encourage more people to use their library?Let them know that they can borrow the latest bestselling books for free, and latest films/tv shows on DVD for a small charge.I've always loved libraries, since I was a child. The sheer potential of so many (free) books... And since becoming a mother in 2008, I've found that our local library is a fantastic resource and place for activities for mothers of babies and toddlers - Baby Rhyme Time was a great way to meet other mothers and babies during my son's first year. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:35:08 GMT+1 freegreenlondon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=77#comment341 I go to my local library several times a week and usually have about 5 library books at home at any one time, plus books borrowed for my toddler.Would you be more likely to visit your library if it was in a pub or supermarket? Definitely notWhere else would you like to see a library? The only other place that might work for me would be in a community centre.Should there be more mobile libraries? For areas where there is no library, and people who are housebound, yes.How can we encourage more people to use their library?Let them know that they can borrow the latest bestselling books for free, and latest films/tv shows on DVD for a small charge.I've always loved libraries, since I was a child. The sheer potential of so many (free) books... And since becoming a mother in 2008, I've found that our local library is a fantastic resource and place for activities for mothers of babies and toddlers - Baby Rhyme Time was a great way to meet other mothers and babies during my son's first year. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:34:14 GMT+1 The Bloke http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=77#comment340 I love libraries, but their real problem is the internet, which has replaced the need for reference sections for most people, and made it much easier and cheaper to buy a very wide range of books.Then there's the growth of charity shops, where used books are available in good condition at very low prices.Libraries can survive, but they do need to change. The main thing they could do is open in the evenings and at the weekend, with decent cafés the norm. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:29:56 GMT+1 in_the_uk http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/haveyoursay/2010/08/do_libraries_have_a_future.html?page=77#comment339 335. At 10:09am on 25 Aug 2010, coolhandpaul wrote:#334 - so you rent a house do you - as I presume you haven't got a mortgage seeing as you've never been in debt.btw we are not a bankrupt country - far from it. There is money being set aside for all sorts of changes this government are making (£1.7 billion for the NHS reforms alone) so don't believe all you read. We are not skint. They want to make changes and are using the belief we are skint to justify it. ----------------------------------Rent thanks. Will at some point settle somewhere and will need a morgage. The point I was making is that people cry over the cuts yet they contributed and I accept cuts must be made but didnt contribute to the problem.When all 3 of the top parties are saying we are skint there must be something in it. Money is being diverted from paying the debt to make NHS changes. Money is also trapped into a number of bad contracts because labour signed them before being voted out. Whoever took over has to honour those contracts even though they are a waste of money.The country is skint. If we paid off the debt we would pay higher tax and get a lot fewer public services. Wed 25 Aug 2010 09:25:51 GMT+1