Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml en-gb 30 Sat 29 Aug 2015 00:05:33 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml loujosephs http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=88#comment8 It will fly, and it is shuttle srbs, no new tech here. The new srb won't make it until 2x..which is 3 to 4 years down the road if the road doesn't stop here. Will the constellation program be canceled more than likely. As it appears the lcross mission didn't find didley or something like him on the moon. Look for a scale back to unmanned launchers man rated like Delta IV or Atlas V. Shuttle will not be retired but will be certificated and will probably fly three to four missions a year. ISS hey Richard won't the next necker island..put in your bid now..as that will be continued past 2015. Before it's sold off Fri 09 Oct 2009 19:58:23 GMT+1 Jonathan Amos http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=77#comment7 Of course, Ares already uses a lot of shuttle heritage, which I've tried to make clear in the post. And, in fact, the proposed upper-stage engine (the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X) harks back to Apollo. But there are those who would like to see the future architecture lean more heavily on the shuttle. If you missed some of the presentations that were shown at the Augustine hearings, you will find them on this page. In particular, I draw your attention to the PDFs of the Direct and shuttle sidemount proposals. In its summary report sent to the White House, the Augustine committee favours a concept known as "Ares 5 Lite". Tue 15 Sep 2009 13:50:08 GMT+1 Angry-of-Bristol http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=66#comment6 NASA already has a tried, proven and spectacularly successful launch system; Saturn V. Wouldn't it have been easier, quicker and far less expensive to dust off the old blueprints and build some new Saturn V rockets and perhaps use them as a test bed for future systems?As for the shuttle fleet, wouldn't it be possible to retrofit them as unmanned re-usable launch systems, with a consequent increase in payload, in order for NASA to stay competitive in the space business? Thu 10 Sep 2009 13:38:49 GMT+1 Mike Mullen http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=55#comment5 If as seems likely manned missions to Mars are dropped from NASA's agenda then it will be a refreshing outbreak of honesty. The past few Whitehouse adminstrations have followed the same pattern:1-Announce a manned mission to Mars as a future goal, always for a time well after the president in question will be enjoying their retirement.2-Do exactly nothing about said goal, except cut NASA's budget when no one's paying attention.If the American public really want to send a man to Mars then they can protest in terms that will give the president a mandate to provide the funds. If they don't, well then why play lets pretend with Mars anymore?As for the Ares 1, this really does look like NASA insisting on having their own design and coming up with it in about 5 minutes while waiting for the meeting on Manned Launchers to start. Man rate the Titan IV, pursue Direct 3.0, or better still pump money into Space-X who are already working on a man rated launcher, what is the point of NASA building its own vehicle to compete with the private sector? If none of these are satisfactory co-operate with the ESA on a manned version of the ATV, or put money into Reaction Engines and Skylon, Anything but this glorified firework NASA seems to be stubbornly clinging to! Fri 04 Sep 2009 12:32:29 GMT+1 DonnyAsh http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=44#comment4 I can picture the scene now....The Ares 1-x is firmly secured to its transporter - with 4 bolts. The rocket, looking like a needle to the crowd gathering to witness the launch, slowly neers the lauchpad.As the driver applies the brakes to holt the vehicle from its present 1/4 mph, he sneezes, causing him to brake a little too sharply. This unfortunately coincides with a light gust of wind, which sends the rocket toppling. With the fuel not yet loaded, the rocket was top heavy.The guys behind the shuttle plan rub their hands in glee, as they congratulate themselves on suggesting that the upper section be fabricated using lead "for stability"... Fri 04 Sep 2009 10:46:02 GMT+1 dennisjunior1 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=33#comment3 Jonathan:Nasa's 'stick of a rocket' - will it launch?Probably yes.....=Dennis Junior= Thu 03 Sep 2009 23:28:18 GMT+1 Hadley_Rille http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=22#comment2 Are you serious? If only it were that easy, maybe Europe would be flying regular service to the ISS by sticking astronauts on top of Ariane 5!1-X only gets to 60km, not quite ISS altitude; it will take another x years for Ares to get up there. And what happened to the first static test firing, due last month at ATK? The VAB was built for Saturn, and then took care of the Shuttle; it is sad to see 1-X and the like in that building. Thu 03 Sep 2009 22:24:16 GMT+1 adjutant http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=11#comment1 Really??? Let's get real; take a shuttle SRB and cobble a few bits (all related to past or current hardware)on top and there you are. Amazed it took that long!Are you serious? If only it were that easy, maybe Europe would be flying regular service to the ISS by sticking astronauts on top of Ariane 5! Thu 03 Sep 2009 18:48:19 GMT+1 Hadley_Rille http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/jonathanamos/2009/09/nasas-stick-of-a-rocket-will-i.shtml?page=0#comment0 "To go from a piece of paper to a full-up stacked rocket in three years is pretty amazing."Really??? Let's get real; take a shuttle SRB and cobble a few bits (all related to past or current hardware)on top and there you are. Amazed it took that long! Thu 03 Sep 2009 17:09:34 GMT+1