Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html en-gb 30 Mon 29 Dec 2014 14:40:24 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html GeoffWard http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=94#comment17 Nice comment, Cypress40 @ 16.You just beat me to it!Sometimes models need inputs of (eg) demeral egg counts in order to be predictive of future stock levels when the cohort strength at entry of an exploited species varies many-fold from year to year.I remain a firm accolyte of the classic Beverton & Holt Dynamic Pool models for exploited species. This yield-outcome model, producing USEABLE yield isopleths, is the best I ever came across and attempted to use. Sun 10 Oct 2010 00:20:08 GMT+1 quake http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=88#comment16 Jasonskeptic why don't you ask whether Richard will be covering the Wegman Report plagiarism investigation? Sat 09 Oct 2010 01:34:25 GMT+1 Cypress40 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=83#comment15 Experts and students in stock assessment have known for a long time that cpue data is unreliable in comparison to standardized surveys conducted by scientists. Stock assessment modeling is a tool used to characterize the level of uncertainty about the population size and it is only as good as the data inputs available. If you listen in on peer review of a stock assessment model, you also learn that the scientific process is difficult and relies on expert judgement based on all we know at the time of the decision. So the blame for failure falls more heavily on the institutional system and human dimensions that limit the quality of the data and the ability of scientists to develop and apply their expertise in an efficient and satisfactory manner. Sat 09 Oct 2010 00:58:06 GMT+1 Scott0962 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=77#comment14 Tuna, the new dodo. Sat 09 Oct 2010 00:30:53 GMT+1 Barry Woods http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=72#comment13 This post has been Removed Fri 08 Oct 2010 17:57:37 GMT+1 jazbo http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=66#comment12 This post has been Removed Fri 08 Oct 2010 17:27:01 GMT+1 Barry Woods http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=61#comment11 I agree GeoffThat is my point!!!! All the money wasted on CAGW...when there are REAL environmental issues to be concerned about!!!!! Fri 08 Oct 2010 13:53:40 GMT+1 GeoffWard http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=55#comment10 Hey, guys,how about *posting to the topic*..... there's much to say and you ónly want to switch any topic on the Earth Watch blog to AGW.There's much more of concern in the world than this!Geoff. Fri 08 Oct 2010 13:25:39 GMT+1 quake http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=50#comment9 This post has been Removed Fri 08 Oct 2010 12:13:49 GMT+1 LabMunkey http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=44#comment8 This post has been Removed Fri 08 Oct 2010 08:26:58 GMT+1 GeoffWard http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=38#comment7 If readers wish to check-out a *really seriously good and well researched report* of the problem, can I strongly recommend the Greenpeace report "Where Have All The Tuna Gone" 11 May 2006http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/international/press/reports/tuna-gone. This is a pdf link so Mods will cut the link; you can gain access via Google search: 'tuna ranching Mediterranean'. You will find that there is a knock-on issue of fish-food supply for the ranched tuna.... locally sourced, and sending Med. clupeoids to extinction; and imported along with viral diseases from eg. West African coast sardinella fisheries. The Dutch are no longer much interested in further depleting the North Sea of our 'trash fish'/sandeel stocks for tuna feed - the adverse effects and publicity caused by the depletion of the European seabird populations hit Dutch reputations really rather hard. Thu 07 Oct 2010 23:33:00 GMT+1 Richard Black (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=33#comment6 #5 John - Imperial story has been live since Wednesday evening.RB Thu 07 Oct 2010 22:14:55 GMT+1 Yorkurbantree http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=27#comment5 Jack Frost: "So are we all supposed to be windmilling MP's in the houses of Parliament because Tuna stocks are low?"Yes. Although i'd probably use the word 'lobbying'. "I've done my bit for tuna, basically I don't eat it. I bet greenies go through tonnnes of the stuff. Shame on you for contributing to a species extinction."Good for you. Your anger at environmentalists for eating lots of fish is a wee bit counterintuitive. You'd get very good odds at Ladbrokes for your bet though...John_from_Hendon:a) There is an article about it on the website - by Richard Black!b) It does not undermine the established cannon of climate change science - so if anyone has to do some pie eating then I guess it is you! Thu 07 Oct 2010 21:49:01 GMT+1 John_from_Hendon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=22#comment4 The rape of the seas is really bad and you are right to highlight the matter, Richard, but why are you so silent about the Solar influence on climate study from Imperial? 'umble pie - one large portion! [Come to think of it that would link well with your previous posting - as the original 'umble pie seems to have consisted mainly of offal!!] Thu 07 Oct 2010 21:04:14 GMT+1 GeoffWard http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=16#comment3 The tuna-catch monitoring Observers observed lies, damned lies and tonnages transferred.This was on the vessels where the skipper knew his statistics were being monitored!Imagine the increased 'statistical error' in the catch statistics from the vessels where no Observers were present..This parallels closely problems encountered in similar bechmark studies on whitefish around the world and, of course, whaling..It seems the problem is one of human unscrupulousness, corruption and lying. This is performed openly and blatently because there is no regulatory enforcement where the sanctions exceed the profit..Because tuna landings are so incredibly profitable, the only appropriate enforcement methodology would be the immediate legal destruction of any non-compliant vessel. The monitoring for compliance works well in the Bering Sea king crab fishery using, initially, massive fines. Imprisonment and repatriation of crew & skipper might follow eg EU marine legislative sanctions within the appropriate EEZ, and Law of the Sea equivalents on the high seas. .It is not beyond the wit of man to manage for compliance more effectively, with the sanctions so suggested.. Thu 07 Oct 2010 20:32:55 GMT+1 U14639698 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=11#comment2 This post has been Removed Thu 07 Oct 2010 18:46:13 GMT+1 jr4412 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=5#comment1 Richard Black.do the proposed quotas and the monitoring side of things actually matter? with prices what they are, the 'market demand' will be met (while there are bluefin tuna left) simply because the amounts are so staggering:"Bluefin tuna are by far the most valuable fish in the sea. In 2001, a single fish sold for $173,600 at Tsukiji. Prices of $10,000 or more per fish are routine. About a third of the bluefin sold at Tsukiji come from the Atlantic and Mediterranean region."another reference (which I can't link to) from 29th Sep 2010 mentions $1,500 per kg.money talks. Thu 07 Oct 2010 16:14:04 GMT+1 Jack Frost http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/richardblack/2010/10/a_fascinating_document_has_fal.html?page=0#comment0 So are we all supposed to be windmilling MP's in the houses of Parliament because Tuna stocks are low?I've done my bit for tuna, basically I don't eat it. I bet greenies go through tonnnes of the stuff. Shame on you for contributing to a species extinction. Thu 07 Oct 2010 15:42:33 GMT+1