Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html en-gb 30 Fri 29 May 2015 10:20:46 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html ghostofsichuan http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html?page=66#comment2 In over 400 years we still say that the "sun rises and sun sets." The sun does neither, we revolve and orbit. Slow learners, I guess. Tue 04 Aug 2009 21:01:00 GMT+1 dbreid http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html?page=33#comment1 There is strong evidence that the first telescope was made by Leonard and Thomas Digges in 1576, two Kentish gentlemen. Colin Ronan, the astronomer and historian, has done extensive research on this (see http://www.chocky.demon.co.uk/oas/diggeshistory.html). This means the telescope and the first astronomical observations of celestial objects (although no written observations have survived) were most likely made by two Englishmen long before Hans Lippershay's first instrument in 1607/8.David Burrett Reid, EPSRC[Personal details removed by Moderator] Mon 27 Jul 2009 12:56:28 GMT+1 cmeador http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/today/tomfeilden/2009/07/celebrating_400_years_of_the_t.html?page=0#comment0 "Heliocentric" indicates a view being centred on the Sun. As used in "although Copernicus had suggested that the planets orbited the sun rather than the earth, the heliocentric Greek model of the universe still held sway" (par. 4), you are conflating heliocentrism with geocentrism. BBC, if I wanted to see rookie mistakes I'd be watching my local American news. Sun 26 Jul 2009 21:10:08 GMT+1