Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html en-gb 30 Mon 27 Apr 2015 05:22:22 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html batoson http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=94#comment16 I have lived in the UK for 28 years and the USA for 29 years. Something you all must understand that ALL countries have pluses and minuses, weather is no exception. While in the UK I witnessed 40-day continuous rain in the late-60s, hurricane-force winds that leveled forests and took the entire stand off the local football club stand and weeks of water-rationing, all in the same region of the UK. In the US I have seen all of the above and more in greater degree. I live in Oklahoma, the summers are very hot (110F is not uncommon for weeks on end) generally May-Oct, no Spring, no Autumn, then hellishly cold and dry winters. In a normal year we go from Ice-storms that destroy MOST local trees in a night to weeks of no rain but plenty of endless air-conditioning melanoma and heat prostration. Add that the EVER-PRESENT threat of tornadoes. The water-table here is dwindling, in the desert regions the supply of water and power where insufficient local supply exists is heading towards a huge problem, both in availability but also provenance.People who think moving to a desert setting will solve their "cloudy" woes should bear this in mind. There is much to be thankful for in the UK, including a regular supply of clean water (YES water quality is a problem here too) flooding notwithstading.Portland Oregon is one of the best places to live in the US, it is also a very rain-filled city. When the water dries up in California, Arizona, Oklahoma and other states the new "Land Rush" will be on. Tue 16 Sep 2008 17:00:42 GMT+1 CP http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=88#comment15 Dear Handysteve,I concede that the trend of increasing temperatures on the hockey stick is a recent phenomenon, and as such it is hard to extract reliable data. I also agree that while we may be in a 'hot period' now, there have been occasions in the past which may well have been hotter. In this instance I think it is the rate of change, rather than the absolute change, that will affect our abilities, and those of other species, to adapt.Your point about the NASA data I will counter in two ways;When aeroplanes were grounded on 11th September 2001, the average global temperature increased- something which seems counterintuitive. The reason has been attributed to the reflective properties of the high altitude contrails. When they were absent on 9/11 additional radiation was able to reach the surface, raditation which would otherwise have been reflected.I see no reason why, with the advent and expansion of jet propelled aircraft since the 1940s, why such a cooling phenomenon cannot also be attributed to this. Since the 70s, warming may begin to catch up as the balance between CO2 emissions and reflective contrails changes, if the latter has reached a maximum efficiency.Secondly, the very fact that grounding aeroplanes for a single day can produce a measurable temperature fluctuation must indicate the inherent ability of man to alter the climate.While it would be silly to attribute everything to humans, I think the highlighted example indicates the delicate interdependency of every element within the closed system of our planet. We are not entirely to blame but we are not helping ourselves.Finally, I cannot see anything wrong in cleaning up our act; after all who wants to live on a polluted planet? Even if it does nothing other than reduce asthma rates, I can't see why anyone would be against it.Regards, Sat 13 Sep 2008 01:06:58 GMT+1 handysteve http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=82#comment14 chisnapc wrote:"I believe that the ice core analysis allowing you to draw your 'millions of years' conclusions are produced by the the same experts promoting the 'hockey stick' trend of climate change"Yes that's right, but you miss my point - the changes I am talking about occurred over very very long periods of time. However, today we have scientists currently making HUGE assumptions about our future climate based on an analysis of very limited data obtained over the past few decades (and not forgetting the added uncertainties of their 'adjustments' to account for time of day readings, urban heat island effects, etc.).I'll say it again, the supposed global warming theory is that increasing CO2 output causes average global temperatures to increase. If you believe that is true, then take a look at the NASA GISS dataset and explain to me why the average global temp actually REDUCED between 1940 and 1970, despite increasing levels of CO2 during the same period. Fri 12 Sep 2008 21:00:04 GMT+1 CP http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=76#comment13 Handy Steve:"The earth's climate has been changing for millions of years and will continue to do so, with or without man's help"Why are you willing accept that the climate has been changing for millions of years? Were you there to watch them all, or are you relying on scientific analysis?If the case is the later, why do you accept this part of the analysis, but dismiss the subsequent conclusions out of hand? Why are the experts right about some bits, but according to you, not others?Exactly what qualifications do you have on the subject, which are of a sufficiently high nature to usurp the authority of countless world experts?I believe that the ice core analysis allowing you to draw your 'millions of years' conclusions are produced by the the same experts promoting the 'hockey stick' trend of climate change.Just because you don't like something, doesn't mean it is wrong, and doesn't mean it isn't happening. Fri 12 Sep 2008 16:51:43 GMT+1 skinnytoes http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=70#comment12 It's dead easy: with climate change as a whole, the globe gets warmer, but that does not mean everywhere gets warmer- many places get hotter, but some places get cooler. Weather is not the same as climate, climate changes over a large number of years. The climate has always changed, but now it is changing very quickly (for a climate change), and that change is because of the historically high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 generated by us burning things. Fri 12 Sep 2008 15:11:29 GMT+1 handysteve http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=64#comment11 lionHeretic wrote:"It is called climate change not global warming. As scientists have come to understand the inter-relation of climates in the world so their views have come to change."Ah yes, funny how it used to be called global warming in the 1980/90s, then when these scientists couldn't explain cooling observed in some parts of the world they started calling it climate change instead.You can't have it both ways - either increased CO2 output causes global temperatures to increase, or it doesn't. Make your minds up.The earth's climate has been changing for millions of years and will continue to do so, with or without man's help. I can't believe how Governments and the media are trying to brainwash people into believing it's all down to man. Fri 12 Sep 2008 13:02:49 GMT+1 lionHeretic http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=58#comment10 AlanLeon wrote:Hang on; didn't the believers in the global warming cult assure us that we would now have baking hot drought-ridden Saharan summers for evermore? I'm sorry for all the people who spent lots of money on the drought-resistant plants that they had been told they would need.It is called climate change not global warming. As scientists have come to understand the inter-relation of climates in the world so their views have come to change. The sahara is getting a lot hotter and drier as are parts of the Med, Australian deserts and American deserts.However, the north atlantic climate presents a more complex problems. This centres around the north atlandtic convayer and the gulf stream. As Siberia gets hotter the perma frost melts dumping fresh water in the north atlantic. This is having an impact on the North Atlantic convayer. This may or may not explain the wet weather. Your assertion that this wet weather is somehow proof of climate change being a falacy is false.You either do not understand the climate change debate or the basis of science itself. Fri 12 Sep 2008 12:00:52 GMT+1 AlanLeon http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=52#comment9 Hang on; didn't the believers in the global warming cult assure us that we would now have baking hot drought-ridden Saharan summers for evermore? I'm sorry for all the people who spent lots of money on the drought-resistant plants that they had been told they would need. Fri 12 Sep 2008 11:23:34 GMT+1 tedyeoman http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=47#comment8 Foddyfoddy the expression you were looking for ..."deluge or drought" Fri 12 Sep 2008 10:27:10 GMT+1 Foddyfoddy http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=41#comment7 dziadek beat me to it.No doubt this time next year there will be talk of water shortages and hosepipe bans. It always seems to be a case of feast or famine (if that's appropriate language to use when talking about water). Fri 12 Sep 2008 09:27:38 GMT+1 Blogpolice http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=35#comment6 I remember the helicopter pictures of last years floods, and the church at (I think) Tewksbury, sitting in a dry island surrounded by flood waters. Did our ancestors know something we don't? Fri 12 Sep 2008 09:19:41 GMT+1 dziadek http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=29#comment5 I would love the BBC to investigate and show us water levels in the nation's reservoirs now.We were shown graphic images when there were water shortages and the water companies were urging austerity.How are things now that the companies have had this, no pun intended, windfall? Fri 12 Sep 2008 07:20:17 GMT+1 BlogAlot http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=23#comment4 I've just moved to Western Australia for 3 months. It was August when I got here just passed mid-Winter it been their driest August for years -beautiful blue skies - temperatures around 22C. It's mid-winter - but not as we know it! It was a relief from the endless gray skies in Glasgow (147% above average rainfall I note from the map). It will be a real mid -winter when I back to Glasgow. Fri 12 Sep 2008 07:07:30 GMT+1 John1948 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=17#comment3 Now don't get me wrong, I know that too much rain can cause lots of people problems and given the prospect of a damper climate planners and the people who finance them (us) should be doing something about it.BUTThere are lots of people who like rain. There is this mythology that sun is lovely and rain is horrid. If you think otherwise you are considered really strange. Even people who have to have their fortnight in the sun often secretly admit that they are pleased to get back to the cooler, damper and green conditions that we enjoy in this country. There are more closet rain lovers than many would believe!!Sun worshippers are adding to global warming, because so many places in the sun rely on ait con to make living there possible. Air con causes summer peaks in fuel consumption that easily rival the winter peaks in colder climatesMust go outside. Its just started raining. Fri 12 Sep 2008 06:03:37 GMT+1 riverside http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=11#comment2 re the US blazing Sun and clear sky.The US desert sounds quite nice, as long as it is not a bit that was irradiated by the 50's nuke tests. I would think twice about the med it is heavily polluted, and continues to recieve pollution and has been referred to as the worlds biggest sewer for a long time, expect more and more bad news to creep out with time, even though the med countries try and smother it. The French Atlantic seaboard sounds better but I await bad news re that. Thu 11 Sep 2008 21:50:22 GMT+1 englishmaninvegas http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=5#comment1 Three years ago I moved here to the Mojave Desert as my American wife didn't particularly enjoy life in England....I have to say that I simply couldn't live in the UK again - largely becuase of the weather... I love my country, and as a Londoner think that my home town is just the finest city in the world, but I just can't take the rain and endless grey skies any more. It so depressing day after day to see nothing but rain and overcast skies - even in what supposedly passes for a "summer"... By contrast - here I wake up to a beautiful blue sky almost every day, even in the winter and it really lifts the spirits ! I'll take 40 degree plus temperatures here for three months of the year over rain any day..If I ever decided to come back to Europe it would have to be somewhere on the Med .... Thu 11 Sep 2008 20:50:06 GMT+1 riverside http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/markeaston/2008/09/wettest_weather.html?page=0#comment0 I too have seen the official rainfall figures and I just don't believe them. I have a bucket in the garden and I have repeatedly had to empty it in August. 186 mm of rain in August in Wales - They must have been measuring under an umbrella. Thu 11 Sep 2008 20:23:15 GMT+1