Comments for http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html en-gb 30 Thu 10 Jul 2014 16:43:20 GMT+1 A feed of user comments from the page found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html esteluk http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=91#comment11 I presume that Virgin's 50Mb service is still subject to traffic shaping? This seriously turned me off of their 20Mb service, and will continue to do the same to this even if it were priced reasonably. Wed 18 Feb 2009 13:23:10 GMT+1 SmartPointer http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=83#comment10 I agree with Spinifex - a download manager will stress the connection more. I'm using Free Download Manager which downloads files in up to 10 (configurable) sections. I can often hit the maximum download speed with this.http://www.freedownloadmanager.org/And to monitor network speeds I'm using the free NetMeter from:http://www.metal-machine.de/readerror/(URL looks odd but is correct)As well as showing instantaneous up/down and a short graphical history it gives you daily, weekly, monthly up/download totals too. Wed 18 Feb 2009 10:15:03 GMT+1 merseymal http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=75#comment9 Would be interested to see how well a HomePlug AV would cope with the bandwidth. Wed 18 Feb 2009 09:35:01 GMT+1 PrinterElf http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=66#comment8 As a user of Virgin's 20Mb service, it does deliver what it promises (outside the traffic shaping hours, of course!)At about 11:00 on Sat, downloading the latest release of SuSe via BitTorrent, (arguably the best test of any connection's throughput), the transfer rate was sustained at 20Mbps for almost 30 mins, so I would expect to download the same in ~12 mins on your XXL connection.Similarly, uploading via BitTorrent is also a very good indication of the connection's capacity, and would be just as effective a test on your 50Mb line.I will confess that I cannot remember if either of the speed tests on either Virgin or thinkbroadband.com use multiple connections to assess the speed, so you may see a more realistic performance estimate by saturating the connection Wed 18 Feb 2009 09:31:11 GMT+1 PhilT http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=58#comment7 Bittorrent and the like are famously greedy for bandwidth, download a few things and leave them shared for upload and see how it performs. Wed 18 Feb 2009 01:44:03 GMT+1 Alan Robertson http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=50#comment6 Completely agree with post #3 from p5yt3k - you need to go for something that will actually stress the upload bandwidth. Have you got a Slingbox? That'd make great use of the extra upload speed :-) Wed 18 Feb 2009 00:18:03 GMT+1 spinifex09 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=41#comment5 hi darren, Thanks for testing the 50 meg! you sound like your very aware of the web :-)i was thinking maybe for test 2 that you use a download accelerator like IDM (Internet Download Manager) and then pull down a file like ubuntu.also if you want another fast server to download from then apple quicktime is a fast server too,all the best,Spinifex. Tue 17 Feb 2009 23:32:29 GMT+1 Mike K http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=33#comment4 If I have read it correctly, this is what you will get when nobody else is active in your area. It would be interesting to know how many other 50Mb customets are in you area. Get them online and downloading and see how your connectivity behaves.Are you pulling a file from a locally hosted server?Gaming is not a bandwidth issue, you needs no more than 30kbps with a consistent 30ms response tme.I am lobbying for more transparency of the end to end service. Take a look at http://www.bbbritain.co.uk Tue 17 Feb 2009 23:09:14 GMT+1 Tramp http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=25#comment3 So what exactly is the point of paying extra for a 50meg connection? You might be able to download a file in 5 mins rather than 20 mins but you'd still have to leave it running and go away and make a cup of tea. And if you're going to have to do that then there is little advantage in having a fast connection. Tue 17 Feb 2009 19:54:34 GMT+1 p5yt3k http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=16#comment2 Gaming doesn't really say much about throughput... typically an online game will use less than 100Kbps of data in both directions.For gaming it is usually the latency of the connection between client and server that determines the quality of the experience. Tue 17 Feb 2009 17:25:32 GMT+1 virtuousNettys http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=8#comment1 This is very interesting. I bookmarked http://www.thinkbroadband.com/ - and will test my speed here in Machynlleth, Wales. Your five high quality Jpegs - about 17MB in all - to Flickr in 90 seconds sounds good. Tue 17 Feb 2009 17:08:33 GMT+1 Spratt1 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/technology/2009/02/speed_diary_day_one.html?page=0#comment0 Interesting article - i had wondered just how much of the 50 MBps people actually received. I am looking forward to the gamer test results as that is the predominant use for my PC. More of a WoW man though... :) Tue 17 Feb 2009 17:07:20 GMT+1