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Your Favourite Freddie Moments

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posted Sep 16, 2010

His 150 odd against South Africa in an innings defeat, the first major innings I ever watched all the way through, and pretty much what got me into cricket.
Thanks Fred

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comment by Simon (U14341385)

posted Sep 16, 2010

that over against Ponting in 2005, world's best batsman didn't have clue, and in general his bowling to Gilchrist in that series completely neutralised him

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posted Sep 16, 2010

The six he hit, which is Dad, who was in the crowd, caught.
What were the odd on that?

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posted Sep 16, 2010

falling of a pedalo

and when he was rat faced meeting the PM after winning the ashes

all good cricketing moments

but seriously, loved watching him play. such a shame his career was cut short.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

the over to popnting in 05, his spell to kallis in 08 and when he hit a six at edgbaston and his dad dropped it

oh and his run out of ponting in 09. all of them classic freddie moments

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posted Sep 16, 2010

Leaving Mansion House for the London open top bus was legendary.
A journalist put a question to him 'so Freddie have you had any breakfast yet ?'
Freddie replies 'I had a cigar at about 6am'

On the pitch I remember his 50 partnership with Simon Jones at Edgbaston when England were is desperate trouble, game winning partnership.
And of course his spell at Lords last year

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posted Sep 16, 2010

I was slightly out of my depth on a beach & Freddie fearlessly jumped in a pedalo & rescued me whilst still off his trolley

Top man - i'll never forget that whistle

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posted Sep 16, 2010

The six he hit, which is Dad, who was in the crowd, caught.
What were the odd on that?

odds on what, that you know who your dad is ?

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comment by AB (U5399681)

posted Sep 16, 2010

My favourite was when Notts needed 2 more bonus points to win the league and Somerset needed an improbably helter skelter chase up in Durham.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

My favourite was when he couldnt bear all the attention Notts and Somerset were getting on the thrilling climax to the CC so he announced his "retirement" so everyone knew it was all about him.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

I bet its been said a hundred times. That moment when he went to Lee after annihilating him with the ball, whilst the rest of England were going crazy with jubilation, he was making sure the bloke was ok. True Sporting Respect.

So many other great displays, a great swan song with the 5 for in his last test goes down oh and that run out of Ponting.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

My favorite Freddie moment?

The tingle of excitement every time he was handed the ball in the 2005 Ashes. Haven't every felt that way watching any other player play.

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comment by Davaud (U12395249)

posted Sep 16, 2010

Everything about the lad. It'll be a while before another like him turns up, but somebody will - there's always one waiting in the wings. Thanks for everything Fred, enjoy your active "retirement".

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posted Sep 16, 2010

I agree with laughingdevil - that sums him up the best. The tingle of excitement when he was handed the ball. You just expected a wicket every time he bowled.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

At times he could be unprofessional off the field. He didn't always look after himself like a professional sportsman should do. He was a beery laddish type and thats why a lot of sports fans identify with him and why he's popular. He wasn't a world class all-rounder though. He had the talent but never the consistency because of fitness issues.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

To me, Flintoff was one of the lads. He would'nt be out of place drinking pints on a friday eve down the local with the rest of us.

He and Botham always had this air about them that they were just ordinary folk and not from the big school brigade.

Both deserve massive credit for inspiring loads of young English cricketers.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

There are all the obvious Ashes related moments in Freddie's career, but for me the most impacting memory was in the West Indies in winter 2009 when he almost crippled himself bowling just trying to take that crucial wicket that would've squared the series. What he put himself through for the team was incredible and it was a travesty that a) we only drew; and b) that spell of bowling may have have signalled the beginning of the end of his career.

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posted Sep 16, 2010

This post has been removed

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posted Sep 16, 2010

The incident happened during last winter's Ashes tour to Australia where Flintoff was captain

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Not sure what point it is you are trying to make buddy, but it definitely wasn't last winter.

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posted Sep 17, 2010

Leaving aside his great performances with bat and ball, the catches, and 'that' run out; surely the finest memory he has left me with is the moment when he went to commiserate with Lee at the end of the test match. Give'Honour to the foe' as a great Welsh flanker said when Llanelli beat the All Blacks. That moment summed up a great man and reminded us all that games are about more than winning or losing, if they have any validity they are about the pursuit of personal excellence: that was an excellent gesture, an excellent moment. Thanks Freddie, many thanks.

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posted Sep 17, 2010

Pompeyfever

Saw an interview with Fred and he said that moment was not as it looked. In reality he went over to Lee, put his hand on his shoulder and said

"Thats 1 -1 you aussie bstad now lets go to the bar"

That should make it an even more special moment in my book!

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posted Sep 17, 2010

Honestly Im gutted, nay devastated that I never got to see him perform in the flesh. I drove from Kent to Leeds to watch day two and three of the 2009 Headingly Ashes test, but Fred was injured, so I never got to see him in action.


The memories that'll live longest are of the 2005 Ashes where Fred had the mighty Gilchrist chasing shadows over and again. Most other bowlers would have dreaded bowling to the best wicket keeper batsman in history, but our Fred didnt.

The thing with Freddie was that I sensed he was ours and not some aloof and distant super star.

In response to those saying Freddie wasnt world class; youre both right and wrong. At his best he was head and shoulders above the next best all-rounder of his era. However, the start of his career was far from ideal with all his fitness problems, but I honestly believe that if hed have been more careful hed have scored more runs, taken more wickets and lasted longer. I say that but then he wouldnt have been the Andrew Flintoff we loved to watch and will miss.

If I were he Id be happy with what Id achieved and given the chance Id not change a single moment.

Matt..

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posted Sep 17, 2010

There are many people that have fallen in love with him due to his "character" and the way he has been a "people person" and hero because they feel as though they can relate to him. Others have lambasted his "behaviour and lack of professionalism" and have claimed this could be the reason for his shortened career.

Both these are actually valid points and are possibly true. Critics would say his "stats" don't allow him to be put into the "world class" category and again this is probably true. However, in my opinion, Freddie was so much more than stats.

Why I think Freddie stands out as a world class performer is the fact that his presence put fear into the opposition which can't be said for many players. A good indication of how good a player is, isn't necessarily what fans think but what fellow players think. Among them, Freddie's reputation was huge in every aspect. Most players wanted to play with him rather than against him and every time someone was asked about a "World 11" he was consistently touted, I admit more for his bowling. This shows he was respected and rated by the opposition.

He also made things happen. When there was a lull in the game, he came up with a vital wicket or a quickfire innings. I would imagine that if you scrutinise carefully the wickets he's taken and concentrated on the importance of them rather than the amount then people would realise how vital he was.

Rightly or wrongly, he put his body through consistent pain. Yes, partly his fault but he kept doing it and never gave up. His attitude on the pitch could never come into question.

I wish his stats where better as this debate wouldn't even be happening but we need to see the whole picture, what he brought to our game, that different dimension.

It's a huge shame he's had to retire and I thank him for so many brilliant moments and know full well that anyone who knows anything about cricket knows just how important and how good Freddie really was. How I wish he had given himself the chance to fulfil all his undoubted talent.

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posted Sep 17, 2010

I read he says "his body can no longer stand up to the rigours of cricket". Come again? Standing in a field of grass all day with your hands in your pocket doing less work there than the average sheep, or sat on a balcony watching. As Bill Bryson said, the only sport where the spectators burn up more calories than the players, though perhaps the term sport was pushing it a bit.
What next, then? Bowls must be out, as you have to bend down a bit every now and then. I guess it will be darts.

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comment by JKdeB (U13886198)

posted Sep 18, 2010

He had three good yeasr from which you can pick many gret moments. Unfortunately there were few good performance sin the other 8 years.

Stats can lie but not over the number of games Freddie play. He was just average really even allowing for three great years.

Anyone thinking that all the other intangibles he brought to the team or the game make up for the shocking career stats just don't understand the game.

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posted Oct 22, 2010

he was no all rounder, a world class bowler, a world class sledger and a walking sicknote.

and probably the best player to come out of england in the last 10 years

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comment by JKdeB (U13886198)

posted Oct 28, 2010

and one of the worst captains we ever had

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