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Ricco admits

Tour de France
by tgsgirl (U12454324) 30 July 2008
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That he took CERA (3rd generation EPO) before the Tour. He says it was a 'youthful sin' and is no longer asking for any counter expertise.

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posted Jul 31, 2008

Life ban, and prison sentance. If he gives name, reduce the length of the sentance.

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posted Jul 31, 2008

MatthewUK,

Surely leniency must be used in this case, but only if, like Chambers for example, he is will to tell the whole story about it. Does our legel system not "reward" perps for pleading guilty, or info on other crimes. I understand he will be subject to non-uk laws and regs, but i feel that we cannot leave a promising rider, who yes, doped.

Do we not appuald legdends of the sport who have doped, Tom Simpson for example. Applauded for being one of our greatest Tour riders ever (only behind Robert Millar imo), yet he died partly because of the drugs he was on. David Millar, Doped, now applauded for his views. If Ricco does a "D.Millar" we should accord him the same respect as we do to a British rider. I have a sense national loyalty is involved in this... If Ricco was british, i reckon this board would be full of "Reduce his sentence, he's young, it's a mistake etc etc"

Let the controversy continue =D

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posted Jul 31, 2008

I don't see the case for leniency. If we had always caled for 'the same treatment as those who preceded him', then anti-doping laws would never have changed and we'd still be in the same state of widespread cheating of a decade ago.

The guy has been shameless throughout, and now even has the nerve to criticise TDF testing for not having caught him earlier. Even though it might be true, he is not the guy to be finger pointing right now.

If he does blow the whistle on other involved parties, then I think it should be in exchange for avoiding imprisonment, and not to barter for a shorter suspension.

I think - even if current rules do not provide - that the minimum ban should be 3 (or 4) and not 2 years - this will give the younger generations something extra to think about before doping.

It really is a shame, because Riccò seems capable of really putting on a show where cycling shines the most - up in the mountains - but here I think we need to consider what the sport needs most right now, whether it's an up-and-coming exciting rider or a clean name to the whole sport itself.

In my opinion, it needs the latter rather than the former.

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posted Jul 31, 2008

I agree that incentives should be used to temp Ricco into disclosing his souce. The two year ban should remain but failing to disclose his supplier(s) should result in a prison sentence.

The rewards for winning are high so the penalaties for cheating should be severe to deter temptation. Send out a clear signal to Ricco, if he wants to come clean start talking.

All team managers should have a code of practice and not employ a drug cheat that prefers to protect his suppier.

I disagree with MathewUK I would like to think that a British rider would be treated in the same way

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posted Jul 31, 2008

In many ways those who have been punished the most are his innocent team mates and staff at Suanier Duvall. They who have lost their team sponsor and income as a result.

Maybe they should decide the punishment!

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posted Jul 31, 2008

Protecting suppliers - won't he just say he bought from the internet?

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comment by Ponty1 (U9235186)

posted Aug 2, 2008

Let the French justice system deal with him. A year's prison or whatever they see fit to give him is not unreasonable, and hopefully willdeter others. He broke the law, basta. I just hope that we'll never hear of this cheater (and all other cheaters) ever again. He should never see a starting line again. Similar treatment (lifelong bans) should be given to those who fail to attend doping tests, in or out of competition, in ANY SPORT, including women's 400 m running, whether or not they have been world champions.

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posted Aug 2, 2008

Hard line is the only way to go, why not hand him a life ban? This would be a real eye opener for everyone and would make a stance that doping is completely unacceptable.

Athletes cheat because the money and rewards for winning are so high. However, if the cost of being caught outweighs the price placed on success(ie a whole career's worth of salaries and endorsement lost for a life ban) then athletes would think again.

I say athletes because I think all sports have a problem and cycling is chastised because of it's current forthright stance in letting the world know that it wants to change, rather than sweeping it under the carpet.

Cycling is setting a precedence for all sports.

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posted Aug 2, 2008

"Cycling is setting a precedence for all sports."

<yikes>

Just kidding, for the Tour it's always been there with these guys.

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posted Aug 3, 2008

So Ricco should go to prison for being honest? The word 'scapegoat' comes to mind.

If he's lied under oath then yes, he should have faced jail for perjury. Admitting to taking a substance banned by a sport in order to win a couple of stages is not a crime I want to see culminate in a custodial sentence.

Get some perspective, monkeys.

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