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Cohen left in limbo

Premiership Leicester
by BBC Sport (U3702819) 01 November 2007
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Ben Cohen's intended move to Leicester has fallen through because the amount he earned in his testimonial year at Northampton takes the Tigers over the Premiership's salary cap.

Is it fair to penalise both Cohen and his potential new team over money earned at his former club?

And where does this leave Cohen and his England career?

What do you think should happen next?

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comment by JGW (U2637773)

posted Nov 2, 2007

Cohen is a gimp - out for number one, which makes Hopley's quote ("It's just intensely frustrating that a player is unable to ply his trade because he's been rewarded for his loyalty to one club.") a bit ironic. The reason Cohen is in this mess is because he sulked at not being offered the captaincy.

As for salary caps - can only be a good thing in my opinion.

By the way, I don't think Cohen would have won you the World Cup. To think that is utterly naive.

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posted Nov 2, 2007

it is a shame that a player cannot get onto the park on a Saturday but maybe Cohen will think before he spits his dummy again

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comment by CaptSue (U6461613)

posted Nov 2, 2007

Salary capping if fine as it does prevent the Primadonna syndrome, but why should it be considered as part of any players salary? If a club award a player a testimonial year then that should be a bonus to him not an arm lock on the club. perhaps it could be put in a Trust for his retirement because usually they play one more season and retire. Not sure BC would fit into the Tigers set up anyway.

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posted Nov 2, 2007

Puts footballers wages in perspective. John Terry's yearly salary is more than 3 Guiness Premiership sides wage bills. I for one couldn't have been happier when 80,000 at Wembley for the NFL on Sunday cheered Martin Johnson and booed Terry, as loud as any boos I've heard.

As for Cohen, It's all you deserve for having a testimonial year then leaving in a sulk. Maybe he'll learn some humility now.

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posted Nov 2, 2007

Bit of a farcical situation really.

Why should the Testimonial earnings be counted? Leicester won't be pauing them, so Leicester's saraly payment won't exceeed the cap - this loophole needs to be sorted before it causes a poblem that brings the whole salary cap system crashing down.

Yes I can see the theory behind it - if the testimonial earnings are included in the cap, then the club can't use a testimonail to "misplace" some extra money & break the cap.

But it obviously needs a re-think.

That said, given Cohens actions, I don't sympathise with him.

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posted Nov 2, 2007

You reap what you sew Ben!

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posted Nov 3, 2007

Regardless of whether we think Cohen has been loyal or not.....we don't know everything that has gone on, this rule is bizarre.

The club he is going to is not paying him. The club he is leaving is. So why doesn't it affect Northampton's salary cap? It is probably based on the player's income and not who is paying, but a very bizarre situation. In that case, does that mean that all earnings, like books, TV work, etc, should be counted? I don't think it is. So this is very poorly thought out clause. It does not stand up to legal scrutiny very well.

In reality, it is a payment for 10 years worth of service, so it should be divided by 10, if it is going to be used.

We talk about loyalty to a club, but this ruling is going to make players less loyal and the premiereship less competitive. There will be absolutely no incentive to stay at a less fancied club. You might as well move on earlier to a more glamourous club.

To Ben's defence, he stayed when he could have earned more at a 'bigger' club. He had received offers in the past and turned them down. We don't know, but it was probably likely he was told verbally that if he stayed he would become club captain etc. Things to keep him around. That would burn, if after years of service, after putting your body on the line, which he did, you're told you're not the right kind of player for us, not captain material, you don't really fit in but we will keep you around, I think you would have reason to be miffed.

What I also can't understand is why the management of these clubs don't know the rules and can go around making offers that they cannot honour. Again, legally very shaky grounds.

While we have finally sorted the club-vs-country row, there are many other areas that need sorted. The league is supposed to be professional, but other than paying players, it is organised very unprofessionally.

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posted Nov 3, 2007

GChewie - I like your line i.e. best winger to best whinger!

A really good thread here folks. Mostly sensible, objective comment. Great to hear contrasting opinion that is articulated well. It may not be very scientific but the great majority of contributers do not agree with Cohen's actions.


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comment by Dave (U8052140)

posted Nov 6, 2007

I think it's unfair that he cannot be signed for Tigers, but in reality he has put himself in this situation by quitting Northampton so abruptly. As well as that, Leicester don't really need another (admittedly excellent) winger. With Tuilagi, Rabeni, Varndell, G Murphy, J Murphy and Erinle available to play on the wing, they are already a bit spoilt for choice.

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posted Nov 6, 2007

Blakjak, On no objective basis could you call Cohen an excellent winger. His form for the last few seasons has been nothing special. I think he's gone a bit Beckham and expects to be selected for what he's been and not for what he currently is!

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