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Tour de France - Stage 10

by BBC Sport (U3702819) 18 July 2007
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229.5 km to Marseille on Wednesday might not offer the drama that we've been enjoying over the last couple of stages but with the Tour still wide open, it could still prove to be a crunch day.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

After Stage 10:

BBC's Yellow jersey dreamers:

2 Alejandro Valverde +00:02:35
4 Cadel Evans +00:02:41
6 Christophe Moreau +00:03:18
7 Carlos Sastre +00:03:39
8 Andreas Kloden +00:03:50
9 Levi Leipheimer +00:03:53
13 Frank Schleck +00:05:56
14 Oscar Pereiro +00:06:36
18 Dennis Menchov +00:07:10
21 Alexander Vinokourov +00:08:05
23 Vladimir Karpets +00:08:51
Michael Rogers (DNF Stage 8)

Brits:

76 Charles Wegelius +00:56:45
101 David Millar +01:10:07
151 Bradley Wiggins +01:34:23
165 Geraint Thomas +01:40:34
Mark Cavendish (DNF Stage 8)

Others:

1 Michael Rasmussen
3 Iban Mayo +00:02:39
5 Alberto Contador +00:03:08

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I think predicting the Lanterne Rouge rider is a lot easier than the Maillot Jaune this year!

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posted Jul 18, 2007

Rasmussen, even if he would be still in the yellow jersey (very small chance), will know he has to attack in the Pyreneees. So he will not defend (he might get his team to control the first bit of each stage, but he'll attack) unless he is 6 minutes plus ahead of all the timetrialists.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

@reallywheelie
Maybe they should reintroduce the rule (they had it for a while, because of several riders trying to 'win' the Laterne Rouge) that (after the first week) the last in the GC after each stage gets kicked out.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

DeGuzman: Here's who we would have lost so far (http://tdflr.blogspot.com/):

Prologue: Ruben Lobato (DNS7)
Stage 1, 2, 3: Aleksandr Kuschynski
Stage 4: Remy Di Gregorio (DNS5)
Stage 5: Geoffroy LeQuatre (DNS6)
Stage 6: Enrico Degano (DNF7)
Stage 7: Mark Cavendish (DNF8)
Stage 8, 9: Wim Vansevenant
Stage 10: Gert Steegmans

I rather like the Lanternes Rouge honour. Anyone who is capable of crossing the finish line is a hero as far as I am concerned. Just ask anyone who has done the L'Etape du Tour.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

@reallywheelie
Was just kidding. I like the Laterne Rouge too. Just remembered that period in the late 70s / early 80s when a few guys were very serious about winning it and used lots of tricks. Can't remember the exact details, but I do remember it was funny.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

comment by dummy_half
posted 46 Minutes Ago
Churchy100
---------------------------------
Also the sprinter's teams will usually have got their stage win, and started to think more about how to win the green jersey.

If there are a dozen or so riders in a breakaway, the leader of the sprints contest will let it go to the finish, as there's less chance of losing the green jersey if the breakaway takes most of the points.

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comment by woutster (U873754)

posted Jul 18, 2007

beamerboy36 - a bit late, but better than never.

1939: Sylvere Maes: yellow & KoM.
1948: Gino Bartali: yellow & KoM.
1949: Fausto Coppi: yellow & KoM.
1952: F Coppi: yellow & KoM.
1969: Eddy Merckx: yellow, green & KoM.
1970: E Merckx: yellow & KoM.
1971: E Merckx: yellow & green.
1972: E Merckx: yellow & green.
1979: Bernard Hinault: yellow & green.

The green jersey was introduced in 1953 and if the white jersey had been available in 1969, Merckx would have won that one as well. And that was his first TdF as well.

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posted Jul 18, 2007

Does anyone remember Jay Sweet's video diary from the 1999 Tour, as he cheerfully trailed along in last place every day, until finally eliminated in the Pyrenees?

You know, a lot of people think the Lanterne Rouge is a bit tongue in cheek. But Jay basically rode hundreds of miles across southern France as an ITT. That is quite an athletic feat, which made Lance Armstrong's first Tour victory look like a rest day.

Meanwhile, Jacky Durand lazily (some say 'wisely') sheltered in the peloton all day every day, only "Attacking off the back" when the competition had disappeared. He used to ride very conservatively in the Lanterne Rouge competition, never once flirting with the risk of elimination. Quite surprising, for such an aggressive rider.

Never mind these posers who win the yellow and polka dot jerseys. They usually only get the KoM as a by-product of winning on GC. That's easy. Jacky Durand used to attack at the start and go off on his own for 200km, finally getting caught 30km from the finish, then dropped and crawling in alone 10 minutes down. THAT's hard!

Surely he was the only rider to win both the Combativity prize and the Lanterne Rouge in the same Tour? Doesn't that say it all?

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posted Jul 18, 2007

I think after Saturday's time trial, where every man for himself, we will see who will lead Astana.

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posted Jul 19, 2007

i dont think there is any doubt about who is leading Astana.

firstly, Vino has said that they are letting Kloden go for himself and that he will try and help him

second, did you see Vino's face after the last alpine stage. He knew it had gone. There is always someone like this, quite a bit behind, but there are always those who think he might get back. They almost never do (without cheating).

kloden could be very very well placed come friday evening, Vino wont get much, if anything on most of the contenders, maybe a bit off rassmussen and valverde.

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