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Episode Guide
What's My Line Part One

Trivia

What's What's My Line?: The title of this episode comes from a massively successful American game show which ran for thirteen years from 1950. Contestants had to guess the unusual jobs or products associated with mystery guests from clues provided by host John Charles Daly. In the UK version, the mystery guests just mimed their jobs - cue humourous dairyworker antics.

Plush pal: "Dropping by for some quality time with Mr Gordo?" Buffy asks Angel when she finds him in her bedroom. Obviously not, as Angel drops the stuffed pink piggy at once.

Figure Slayer: Buffy confesses to having been obsessed with figure skater Dorothy Hamill - even to the extent of copying her haircut - as a youngster. This is odd, as Hamill's main burst of fame came as she won a gold medal at the 1976 Olympics. If Buffy is sixteen in 1997, then she must have been a very johnny-come-lately kind of fan, fully deserving that place in the geek hall of fame.

Summers on the ice: The episode makes good use of Sarah Michelle Gellar's real life skill at figure skating - it's one of her hobbies.

Whole Nine Yards: As Buffy points out, this saying doesn't make a lot of sense. Possible explanations are that a machine gun belt of bullets was nine yards long, or that a shroud is made out of nine yards of material.

Scooby Dooby-Doo!: This is the first episode in which the Scooby gang are actually referred to as such, by Xander. It is, of course, a reference to the Hannah Barbera cartoon Scooby Doo, Where Are You? Produced as a cartoon between 1969 and 1972, it was about a bunch of pesky kids, plus one very large dog, who travelled around in The Mystery Machine, foiling criminal plans which invariably involved someone dressing up as a ghost.

The series has been revived many times since, with the latest version being a live action film starring none other than Sarah Michelle Gellar herself.

Soft sell: Finally, Oz and Willow come face to face. It seems they've both been picked out for special treatment by recruiters from "the world's leading software concern." Now, which major software concern would be sending people in from Seattle, then?

Religion 101: On seeing the destruction inside the mausoleum, Giles remarks that it seems that a reliquary has been smashed. He explains to Buffy that such items usually contained bits of saints, such as a finger. Buffy's response? "Note to self. Religion: freaky."

Famous reliquaries are valuable pilgrim attractions for many big Catholic cathedrals. The Cathedral of Napoli, for instance, has a phial said to contain the blood of Saint Januarius, which "miraculously" liquifies on ceremonial occasions.

Frog fear: "Don't warn the tadpoles," shouts Willow, as she's roused from her sleep. This is the first hint of her terror of frogs, referred to in several later episodes. The technical term for this fear is ranidaphobia, from rana, the Latin for frog.

Where can a guy get a drink round here?: We learn of yet another Sunnydale wateringhole - the seedy Willie's Bar. Where Angel is obviously known, and vamps are treated right. Well, I suppose everyone's got to have somewhere to relax.

It be de vompire slayer: Enter Kendra, with her strange, strange accent, and her apparent ability to survive asphyxiation. Well, how else did she breathe in that aircraft hold? They're not pressurised, you know.

Index Trivia Review

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