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The Simpsons go Cornish for Christmas
Homer, Matt and Marge
Homer and Marge with creator Matt Groening

The Cornish language will be used on Christmas Day in a special festive edition of The Simpsons.

To celebrate the arrival of Cornish in Springtown we have copies of The Simpsons Comic 100th edition to giveaway!

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FACTS

Matt Groening changed television forever when he brought animation back to primetime with this immortal nuclear family.

He is also creator and executive producer of the FOX animated series Futurama.

Originally brought to life in 1987 for FOX's Emmy Award-winning series The Tracey Ullman Show, The Simpsons was Groening's introduction into the animation world.

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Makers of the hit cartoon series The Simpsons contacted Cornish speakers earlier this year, to ask for help in making a Christmas Day special for the UK.

The episode will feature Lisa Simpson shouting "rydhsys rag Kernow lemmyn" (freedom for Cornwall now) as she runs around the house in Springfield.

The production team wanted the correct pronunciation and contacted the Cornish Language Fellowship.

The Channel 4 show is intended as an alternative to the Queen's Speech.

Bart Simpson
Bart's 'Eat My Shorts' look!

Matthew Clarke, Cornish Language Fellowship
The show's executive producer Tim Long emailed the Cornish Language Fellowship for advice on the phrase they wanted to use.

He had heard it used by a US comedian and wanted to include it in the show.

Press officer Matthew Clarke advised the producers on the phone on the pronunciation and suggested that Lisa should wave the black and white flag of St Piran.

He said: "We have a lot of requests from people about the Cornish language, but this has to one of the coolest."

"Cultural issues can get a bit stale, so it's nice to have a global phenomenon like The Simpsons interested."

Official recognition

He added: "I know it's only a cartoon series, but it may make some people sit up and think.

"Everyone wants to be on The Simpsons, from Simon Cowell to Tony Blair."

Win this Mag, see below!
We're giving away copies of The Simpsons 100th Edition Comic, see the box below for more

Other household names to have appeared as themselves in the show include U2, the Rolling Stones, Sir Paul McCartney, Leonard Nimoy, Mel Gibson and Sting.

Cornish, or Kernewek, is the sister language or Welsh and Breton and was formally recognised by the EU in 2002.

A number of supermarkets and pubs in the county have bilingual signs and while only a small number of people speak Cornish fluently, thousands have a smattering of the language.

The Simpsons Competition

To celebrate Cornish in The Simpsons and the festive season. We have copies of The Simpsons Magazine 100th issue to give away.

It features comic strips of the famous American family, the fans ideas as to how the 100th edition cover should have looked and much more!

To be in with a chance of winning you will have to enter our Simpsons quiz.

Click here to find out more

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