BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page was last updated in May 2008We've left it here for reference.More information

28 July 2014
Accessibility help
Text only

BBC Homepage

Local BBC Sites

Neighbouring Sites

Related BBC Sites


Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

Local History

You are in: Cambridgeshire > History > Local History > Mary Queen of Scots' last days

Ftheringhay Church

Fotheringhay Church

Mary Queen of Scots' last days

The borders of Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire hold many links to the executed Mary Queen of Scots. Fotheringhay, Oundle and Connington hide artefacts which led the Queen to her death. Does she still haunt some of them?

Scot's Ghost!
Film maker:Allan Mott
Length:2:27
Subject:History, Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Fotheringhay, Oundle, Peterborough, Mary Queen of Scots.

Mary Stewart had led the most tumultuous of lives. Born in 1542 in West Lothian, Scotland, she became Mary Queen of Scots at only six days of age.

Fotheringhay castle

All that's left of Fotheringhay Castle

Spending almost 20 of her 45 years of existence imprisoned or on the run she was supposedly raped, captured and attacked by enemies and supposed allies throughout her life.

She also served as Queen of France and her son would become the first Stuart (changed to the French form of Stewart) King of England as James I.

Her relationship with Elizabeth I of England had been fraught with failed arrangements and would later prove to be the cause of her execution.

Talbot Hotel stairs

Are the Talbot Hotel stairs haunted?

Believing Mary to be plotting her murder Elizabeth tried the Queen of Scots at Fotheringhay Castle, a few miles southwest of Peterborough. She was found guilty and was beheaded on February 8th, 1587 at the same place.

As Allan Mott shows in this film, all that remains of the castle (also where Richard III was born) is a small mound and large stone, but there are items which are believed to share a history with Mary.

The staircase at the Talbot Hotel in Oundle is rumoured to be the very stairwell which Mary descended before her execution - some even believe she still haunts them.

Inside Fotheringhay Church

Inside Fotheringhay Church

Fotheringhay Church, which still survives, homes a carved wooden chair which is reputedly the seat from which Mary rose before her head was removed.

The hapless Queen's connection to the area continued as she was buried at Peterborough Cathedral, although her son, King James I, later had her remains moved to Westminster Abbey.

Scot's Ghost!
Film maker:Allan Mott
Length:2:27
Subject:History, Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Fotheringhay, Oundle, Peterborough, Mary Queen of Scots.

last updated: 02/05/2008 at 15:34
created: 30/04/2008

Have Your Say

Do you believe the rumours?

The BBC reserves the right to edit comments submitted.

Marion EM Hampton
It is so very interesting since I am from Europe; cant believe how cruel the punishment was back then; she was a beautiful person accoring to the book I read!

Christina Hoffman
I do believe in ghosts of all kinds,there are a interest I have.I,m a mother of one,who reads almost anything that has to do with ghost,demons,angels,whitchs;ect.I just wanted to say thank you and keep up the good work. Yours Truly, Christina H.

mr shapo
i don't know what to think about this! i don't think that liz wanted to exicute her. but then had to, what is the ghost sapposed to be doing?

goodman1
it is agood thing that she was executed as we would all have to have one religion.and it would mean persecuion of a lot of people.

lisa
it is a good thing that mary still haunts some of the places as she was killed against her will so it is a good thing

Helen
It is very likely Queen Mary still haunts several places. She was killed against her will and her spirit is still looking for peace and quiet.

ALFE
I WILL BE SCARED

andrew
mary queen of scots was a great beauty women in world history.

Alan Fielding
The rumours could well be true. Such a bloody and barbaric past could easily generate images within the brain. When we are born we inherit physical features of both parents, so why should we not inherit some mental imprints from their lives too? Deja vu would easily be explained in this way. Those that have experienced Mary Queen of Scots' ghost could well exist in some people's minds.

You are in: Cambridgeshire > History > Local History > Mary Queen of Scots' last days



About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy