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We Media Blog

Global forum 3 - 4 May, London

About this blog

  • 25 Apr 06, 01:19 PM

The BBC We Media blog will provide live coverage of the the debates and ideas coming out of the We Media global forum.

This is a two-day conference being held in London on 3 and 4 May, hosted by the BBC, Reuters and the US-based think-tank the Media Center.

The event is looking at issues like trust, the role of media in a connected society and the power of consumers to make the news through citizen journalism.

It is a pretty exclusive gathering, and not just because of the $795 registration fee. But you will be able to follow the discussions here and also by watching our live stream from the conference.

The aim of the blog is to offer a way of tapping into the thoughts and ideas from some of the world's most interesting minds in the world of media and technology.

Of course, there will be a way to leave your comments and tell us how the digital era is changing the way you get your news.

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Conferences, news reports, media stars...all very retrograde, no?.
A desperate attempt by mainstream media to claim the high ground through orthodox means. Reminds me of the "chaos" that emerged in the US with the development of radio, then the corporations stepped in and never went away. It's already happened...now that customers are fragmented, we are encouraged to develop our own blogs (thus create the content) that the advertising then rides on towards the niche markets - which we also create. What used to be friends and fmaily now become more consumers in the message.

How many jobs lost? How many careers no no longer exist while we are all non-paid outsourced 'authors' creating our own 'communities'over which we have the questionable title 'moderator'.

On the other hand...the blog phenomenon has also revealed how much genuine talent is out here, but not put to legitimate and more meaningful use (paid work!). That, I think is the uncomfortable truth now emerging. The wastage of excellent skills and competences that's tolerated and accepted by the system.

More, by the way in the 2005 publication "We, the media...", Peter Lang, pp.418...on how the US news broadcasting system and Reality TV format was represented in Hollywood films from 1976 to 1999...

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  • 2.
  • At 12:06 PM on 03 May 2006,
  • Srikanth wrote:

I wish to share my views on the current state of media from the perspective of a concerned citizen and an active reader of printed and digital media.

On the fundamental issue of informing the public the media, British media in particular, has not lived upto the expectation. It came to a point, where the news reportage has become predictable. If an event happens, intelligent reader could predict which aspect each main stream news paper will chose to highlight. This can be attributed partly to the financial and market pressures that media has to face. However, alarmingly, modern journalists have not achieved that fine balance which empowers them to separate their personal socio-political beliefs from the objective reporting of the facts.

In some cases, some sections of the media have reported what goes well with the reader than what the reader has to be informed. In effect they have reduced readership to market and each group of readers have to be safeguarded at any cost, even if it means teeling them what they want to hear from their news paper than what they should know. I would like to draw the attention to the coverage by the British press of the cartoon issue and the aftermath. Interested people can read through the archives of the broadsheets and judge for themselves how objective the media has been.

Gone are the days when news is considered sacred. Now the newsworthiness of any event/issue is purely dependent on its readership appeal and market share.

On the important issue of covering politics and governance, the media has effectively put politicians in a position where the best they can do to be seen as effective is to deliver sound bites. Government policies these days are more governed by their news wothiness than public good.


However, despite all these deficiencies, the media did discharge its duty when it comes to report on art, science and culture.

A final point, what is an acceptable number of pages for a news paper? These days, the add ons literally outweigh the main paper. Where are we heading?

--
Srikanth


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  • 3.
  • At 11:14 PM on 03 May 2006,
  • frank wrote:

I thought this would be really interesting. However, I think bottom up was the issue, put you shades on and stop the glare! This is not the real world, this is 'we're hip, honest, we are'. I can educate myself on the internet, I don't need the nanny media to teach me - you can't control me any more.

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  • 4.
  • At 08:08 PM on 08 May 2006,
  • George E. Todd wrote:

As an Oldie newcomer to this internet business, I'm just appaled at the time and effort is given to trivial stuff like blogging, when the those involved could or should be doing something more useful with their lives.

Coupled with other terrible things man has invented in this past century like the atomic bomb (does anyone still remember it?), the silicon chip opened a door to a micro-electronic world that has changed all our lives for ever, for good or bad. And I believe it's bad.

I am convinced that we'll all go stark raving mad with the ever-increasing electro-magnetic radiation penetrating our mobile-phone fried brains. Something Michael Faraday never though of!

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