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Welsh theatre buildings on 'at risk' register

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Laura Chamberlain Laura Chamberlain | 15:38 UK time, Monday, 18 July 2011

Ten Welsh theatres have been placed on The Theatres Trust's 2011 Theatre Buildings At Risk register, double the amount of Welsh buildings that made last year's list.

According to The Theatres Trust website, there are estimated to be over 180 theatre buildings in Wales, of which 10 are identified as Theatre Buildings At Risk:

  • Palace Theatre, Swansea (Grade II)
  • Conwy Civic Hall
  • Theatr Harlech
  • Parc Hall, Cwmparc, Treorchy
  • Pontypridd Town Hall (Grade II)
  • Theatre Royal, Barry
  • De Valence Pavilion, Tenby
  • Albert Hall Theatre, Llandrindod Wells (Grade II)
  • St Donats Arts Centre, Llantwit Major
  • Corwen Pavilion

 

St Donats Arts Centre, Llantwit Major. Image courtesy of The Theatres Trust Image Library.

St Donats Arts Centre, Llantwit Major. Image courtesy of The Theatres Trust Image Library

Interior of Pontypridd Town Hall. Image courtesy of The Theatres Trust Image Library

Interior of Pontypridd Town Hall. Image courtesy of The Theatres Trust Image Library

Mosaic outside Theatre Royal, Barry. Photo © Rob Firman

Mosaic outside Theatre Royal, Barry. Photo © Rob Firman

Over half of the UK theatres on its at risk register, which has risen to 58 since last year, are yet to find the financial and political support needed to secure a viable future.

However, in slightly brighter news, two Welsh theatre buildings have been taken off the list; Theatr Elli in Llanelli (Grade II listed) and the Patti Theatre at Craig-y-Nos (Grade I listed).

For more information on the Welsh venues at risk, visit The Theatres Trust website.

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