Wales

Tagged with: World War One

Posts (40)

  1. Editor, BBC Radio Wales

    Welcome to 2015

    A day with the orchestra, Caradoc Evans and the greatest Welshman never heard of. Radio Wales Editor Steve Austins picks his highlights for the first week of 2015

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  2. The story of Owen Money's grandfather James Mittell in the First World War who was given a Miltary Medal for bravery at the battle of Vimy Ridge, much to Owen's surprise who believed that no-one in his family had done anything special.

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  3. Record showing Oswald Hinks attempts to enlist in World War One despite being only 15. Hinks was BBC Wales broadcaster Gareth Lewis’ great grandfather.

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  4. One of the questions I am most frequently asked is “what did my grandfather do in the war?”. Most people who have an ancestor who served during WW1 have an idea of their battalion or their service number but not always an idea of exactly where their ancestor went and which battles they fought.

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  5. At the end of my last blog I finished with a single question "How and when did Sapper David James Roach get injured"

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  6. It all started when we had family parties back in the 1950s at my home. There was much talk about Annie during these occasions. Apparently my great aunt was a nurse in WW1 and, as a 10-year-old boy I was curious to know more.

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  7. In my spare time when I am not reuniting people I love to try and solve a riddle - and I'm not talking about Sudoko. This year it seemed obvious to me that the most poignant riddles waiting to be solved are those which involve WW1 medals.

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  8. When you think about Prisoner of War Camps your mind invariably turns to the internment of British servicemen in German camps like Colditz during the Second World War. However, there were also many British Prisoner of War camps – and not just in the Second World War either, in the First World War, too. One such camp was Dyffryn Aled, high up on the moors of Denbighshire in North Wales.

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  9. Hermann Ethé was a German Professor of German and Oriental Languages at Aberystwyth University. Following the outbreak of war, his continuing presence in the town sparked a series of disturbances that targeted him and his wife.

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  10. How did the war affect women in Britain and, particularly, in Wales? There is a widely-held view that women were rewarded with enfranchisement for their participation in the 'total war' effort and there is evidence that supports such a view.

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