Tagged with: South wales

Posts (115)

  1. According to the auctioneer conducting the sale of legendary Newport venue TJ's, it is 'unlikely' to be used as a music venue in the future. Paul Fosh auctions will be selling TJ's on 15 September at Cardiff's Park Inn Hotel. It is being sold following the death of its owner John Sicolo in 20...

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  2. With the announcement of a Michael Jackson tribute concert planned for Cardiff, we've been looking though the BBC Wales archive for material from the last time he played in Wales. Here's a clip from Wales Today in 1988, just before Jackson played Cardiff Arms Park national stadium. Look out for some great clothes and hair: Were you at the concert? Send us your memories! If you want to have your say, on this or any other BBC blog, you will need to sign in to your BBC iD account. If you don't have a BBC iD account, you can register here - it'll allow you to contribute to a range of BBC sites and services using a single login. Need some assistance? Read about BBC iD, or get some help with registering.

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  3. One of Wales' iconic buildings, the old Welsh Hills Works site in Porth, has been taken over by a charity who will be launching it as The Factory later this month. "The aim of the project will be to develop the building as a creative hub for enterprising young people who are involved, or woul...

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  4. Cardiff-based dance music journalist Joanna Louise Ranson takes a look at the drum and bass scene that's concentrated around the Cardiff area. "Wales has never been regarded as a great place for drum and bass but it's becoming a key player in the development of electronic music in the UK. It ...

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  5. The Welsh rock scene, as evinced by Bethan Elfyn's Start Something documentary at the start of this year, is all very healthy and a regular presence in the UK's rock music press. That is, if they're melodic, poppy and full of hooks. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but there is - as always...

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  6. A serendipitous date this weekend has given Llandaff Cathedral the opportunity to add to the coffers of its organ appeal. The 10th day of the 10th month of 2010 is being marked by the world-famous cathedral by Ten Tenors - an gala event with some of Wales' foremost tenors performing a selecti...

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  7. Lostprophets, Katherine Jenkins, Only Men Aloud and Shaheen Jafargholi are all part of an... 'eclectic' line-up to celebrate the coming of the Ryder Cup to Wales this year. The Welcome to Wales event, staged at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium on 29 September, will also feature the two Ryder Cup ...

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  8. YouTube has been forced to remove Newport (Ymerodraeth State Of Mind) from its servers due to a copyright claim by EMI Music Publishing Ltd. For the time being, at least, Goldie Lookin' Chain's response, You're Not From Newport, is still available on the site, as is a performance at the Transporter Bridge (warning: links contain strong language). I have thought since this video first came to light that there was a certain legal ambiguity to the song and its lyrics. While straight cover versions are entirely legal (as long as properly credited) and a staple of the music business from the very top to the very bottom, interpretations of existing songs are a different matter altogether. 'Substantial rewrite' is a pseudo-legal term in the music industry meaning that when you're covering a song or using an element of a song - whether lyrically or musically - it requires the permission of the original copyright holder. This can be a complex process: you get in touch with the Performing Right Society, the organisation responsible for the administration of song copyrights (music and lyrics, but not recording) in the UK. The PRS works with their relevant partner organisations across the world (in the USA it's ASCAP and the BMI), who then find out from the relevant publisher whether the songwriter is amenable to the rewrite. Obviously this laborious process means that the vast majority of rewrites, pastiches and spoofs are ignored or simply never heard about. There's a certain level of publish-and-be-damned to it; who cares when you're playing to 50 people in a club? But the power of the internet means that something can blow up - go viral, if you prefer an awful expression - and suddenly who can turn a blind eye to it? Two and a half million YouTube hits meant that the publishers of the Jay-Z and Alicia Keys' original almost had no choice but to knock it on the head. Jemima Kiss in The Guardian wrote, "OK, it's a rip-off of the Jay-Z and Alicia Keys song. But it has a significant amount of original work, video, rewritten lyrics and a good concept. Isn't that fair use?" However, the fact that it does have original work and rewritten lyrics, plus the sheer volume of hits, means it's skating into the middle of a frozen lake wearing stilletoes. Sure it would be nice if we could all get along and things could be done on the nod-and-the-wink, but the music industry doesn't work like that. Assuming that the video was taken down because of the 'substantial rewrite' regulations, it's a shame but not unexpected. Update (11 August, 9am): A statement from EMI, quoted by Radio 1's Newsbeat, said, "When a song is created based wholly on any of our writers' works, those writers need to grant their permission. "If that permission isn't granted, then we ask the service in question to remove the song." The director of the video, MJ Delaney, said she was unable to comment at the moment. Feel free to comment! If you want to have your say, on this or any other BBC blog, you will need to sign in to your BBC iD account. If you don't have a BBC iD account, you can register here - it'll allow you to contribute to a range of BBC sites and services using a single login. Need some assistance? Read about BBC iD, or get some help with registering.

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  9. Paul Potts, Port Talbot's opera-singing Britain's Got Talent winner, has split from Simon Cowell's record label. Syco Records, a subdivision of Sony, had worked with Potts since the 2007 competition, but the parties have separated prior to the release of his third album, Cinema Paradiso. T...

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  10. Bethan Elfyn's show on Radio Wales is always an interesting mix of old and new, good interviews and ephemera, but on Saturday 14 August at 6pm it's shaping up to be a superb two hours of Welsh music, and I've been given a sneak preview of what has to be one of this year's Welsh radio highlights. Manic Street Preachers' James Dean Bradfield spent an hour with Beth last week, pre-recording an amazing interview which covered many topics from their early days in the band, his formative musical experiences, Richey Edwards' lyrics and the new album, Postcards From A Young Man. It's a fascinating listen. The show's producer, Darren Broome says, "This one for the fans... It's probably his most revealing interview to date; he explains why the Manics still believe in albums as art, his choirboy past, why record shops matter and why getting his heroes on the new record really made his day." Those heroes include John Cale, Echo And The Bunnymen's Ian McCulloch and Guns N' Roses' Duff McKagan. James talks incredibly fondly of McKagan and being able to play Gn'R's It's So Easy at Hammersmith Odeon with him. James also takes Bethan through his Personal Playlist, which is an eclectic and fascinating listen. This week on the show (Saturday 7 August, 6-8pm, BBC Radio Wales) The Blackout play an acoustic session and the band's Gavin Butler also performs solo. The band are interviewed too, and we'll be blogging about that next week, so look out for that. Feel free to comment! If you want to have your say, on this or any other BBC blog, you will need to sign in to your BBC iD account. If you don't have a BBC iD account, you can register here - it'll allow you to contribute to a range of BBC sites and services using a single login. Need some assistance? Read about BBC iD, or get some help with registering.

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