Wales

Tagged with: Mammals

Posts (9)

  1. X-Ray blog - Lucy investigates the moving story of Buddy the beagle. His owners thought they had found him a good home, but hours later he seems to have been put up for sale on the internet.

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  2. These days rabbits are often kept as pets although rabbit meat is still considered a delicacy in many quarters. Yet they did not exist in Britain until after the Norman Conquest.

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  3. Father and son duo, Jeff and Ashley Cohen - regular contributors to our Wales Nature Flickr group have just sent in some amazing, yet brutal shots of a stoat killing a rabbit up in Conwy, North Wales. Looks away now if you're squeamish but remember this is what nature is all about - survival of the fittest! This particular stoat family lives near the seashore at the Conwy RSPB Reserve and uses the beach as a short cut, so yes, that is seaweed you're seeing in some of the shots! It appears as if Conwy is rapidly becoming one of the best places in Britain to see stoat in the wild and other members of our Flickr group have also sent in remarkable pics from the same location. A curious stoat amongst the rocks.Image by Ashley Cohen. The stoat scarpers away with its prize. Image by Jeff Cohen. The stoat readjusting its grip on the dead rabbit. Image by Ashley Cohen. Stoat cuddle by Adrian Foster. Find out more about stoat on BBC Wildlife Finder. How to tell the difference between a stoat and a weasel on www.wildbritain.com. Stoat on Wikipedia. Snow-crazed stoat video on BBC News.

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  4. We might just see another Welsh island stronghold for red squirrels in the not so distant future.. Those wise monks on Caldey Island, off the coast of Tenby have devised plans to re-introduce red squirrels to the island. Caldey Island by Tracey Cole. It's generally agreed by every...

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  5. Good news for the reds on Anglesey as specially designed rope bridges are being proposed to help prevent the squirrels from becoming road kill. A red squirrel by Alan Burfitt: The technique has already been used successfully elsewhere and it's hoped that this will allow the squirrels t...

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  6. Tony Llewellyn sent in an amazing photo of a shrew and caterpillar that I just had to share with you. I've no idea how he managed to capture this shot but here it is, for you all to marvel over: Shrews as you can see from this photo are tiny creatures, only around two to three inches long an...

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  7. The red squirrels at Plas Newydd, Anglesey received a royal visit last week when Prince Charles popped in. The prince was there to see for himself just how successful the re-introduction project had been in the the woodland surrounding the historic house. Prince Charles during his visit - image courtesy of the National Trust: Six squirrels were brought to Plas Newydd (a former stronghold for the species) in October 2008 and held in woodland enclosures for a few weeks, before being released into the woods over the winter. A red squirrel - image courtesy of the National Trust: They bred successfully and the squirrels can now be found throughout the estate. Some have even crossed the Menai Straits to recolonise Gwynedd. The mixed deciduous woodland has a high canopy and great arching boughs - perfect habitat for red squirrels. Plas Newydd is open daily except Thursday and Friday from 11am - 5.30pm. Gull

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  8. Thousands of you will be joining in this week to take part in the RSPB garden wildlife survey which runs from 5-13 June. The RSPB is keen to find out as much as they can about mammals such as moles, badgers, foxes as well as birds to build up an accurate picture of what is visiting our gardens at this time of year. A fox by Mark Hamblin (rspb-images.com): The wildlife charity also wants to know where you live in order to identify urban, rural and regional variations in species. Almost 3,000 people took part in the survey last year so it would be great if we can better it this time around. The results made for some interesting reading too. For instance - you're far more likely to see a fox in an urban garden than you are out in a more rural setting. Taking part is simple - Just spend one hour during the week of 5-13 June counting birds and other wildlife that you see in your garden and record the highest number of each species that you see at any one time. You'll be able to log all your results on the RSPB website from 5 June - 5 July so don't panic you have plenty of time. To help you identify birds you can download a bird spotter form. The information you collect can then be transferred to the online form from 5 June onwards. Bilingual forms are available by phoning 02920 35300. You can also send in any wildlife pictures to our BBC Wales Nature Flickr group. We've got over 10,000 images in there currently. Nick from BBC Local NE Wales has also been showcasing some of your local wildlife pictures. That's it - get out there and get spotting this weekend! Gull

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