Tagged with: history

684 posts about history on this blog

  1. The Cardiff Blitz

    Friday 1 July 2011, 11:48

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    When war broke out in September 1939, Cardiff docks constituted the biggest coal exporting port in the United Kingdom, maybe even the world.

    Sitting on the flat coastal plain below the twin Rhondda valleys, Cardiff sent out a much greater tonnage of coal than any other British...

    Read more about The Cardiff Blitz

  2. Catch up with developments at Llanelly House on the Roy Noble show

    Thursday 30 June 2011, 13:00

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    This afternoon on BBC Radio Wales, Lisa Bancroft, Development Manager at Llanelly House in Carmarthenshire, joins Roy Noble to chat about the incredible restoration work that this 18th century, Grade I listed Georgian house has undergone.

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  3. Wales and the world's first passenger helicopter service

    Wednesday 29 June 2011, 16:15

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    These days we regularly see helicopters flashing over head and think nothing more about it but in the immediate post-war days, helicopters were a rare sight in the skies above Britain.

    So, it comes as something of a surprise to find that the world's first scheduled passenger helicopter service took...

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  4. Dic Penderyn, the Welsh Martyr

    Tuesday 28 June 2011, 11:58

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the early summer of 1831, many of the the towns and villages of industrial Wales were marked by political and social unrest.

    Terrible working conditions in the mines and iron works of the country were made even worse by wage cuts and, in some cases, by the laying off of men as demand for iron and...

    Read more about Dic Penderyn, the Welsh Martyr

  5. The Montague on Lundy

    Wednesday 22 June 2011, 15:02

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Lundy Island, that knotted fist of rock set in the Bristol Channel, is not really a Welsh island at all. It actually belongs - postally at least - to Devon. But so many Welsh men and women, boys and girls, took trips there in the days when the White Funnel Fleet regularly patrolled up and down the Channel...

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  6. The opening of Holyhead's new harbour

    Monday 20 June 2011, 09:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    On 17 June 1880, the tiny north Wales town and port of Holyhead was suddenly filled, almost overwhelmed, by thousands of visitors and dignitaries. They had come to watch and applaud as the Prince of Wales formally opened the port's new harbour and hotel.

    The occasion was a dramatic and important one...

    Read more about The opening of Holyhead's new harbour

  7. Twm Sion Cati - the Welsh Robin Hood

    Thursday 16 June 2011, 10:30

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    If there is one name or character from legend that most Welsh children have heard about, it is that of Twm Sion Cati.

    In book, in comic strip and on television, he has been represented as the Welsh Robin Hood, a fabulous...

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  8. The Thetis disaster

    Wednesday 15 June 2011, 09:09

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    The North Wales coast has seen many shipping disasters over the years but none more tragic than the loss of the brand new submarine HMS "Thetis" in the summer of 1939. The submarine was on her maiden voyage and 99 men died when she sank in the waters of Liverpool Bay, just 15 miles to the east of Llandudno...

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  9. Sir George Everest

    Monday 13 June 2011, 17:57

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Have you ever thought where Mount Everest got its name from? It was actually named after the Surveyor General of India who, incidentally was a Welshman.

    George Everest was born at Gwernvale, Crickhowel in Powis on 4 July 1790. Early on...

    Read more about Sir George Everest

  10. The Welsh Houdini

    Thursday 9 June 2011, 16:50

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the last years of the 19th century and in that short, seemingly idyllic period before the outbreak of World War One, the fame of one small man from Merionethshire was so great that newspapers all over the country led with tales of his exploits. Postcard publishers happily produced visual records of...

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  11. Allen Raine, forgotten Welsh writer

    Wednesday 8 June 2011, 15:20

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Allen Raine, the pen name of Anne Adaliza Puddicombe, was one of the best-selling authors of the late Victorian/early Edwardian age.

    Her books sold millions of copies, not only across Wales but in the whole of Britain, and yet these days she is largely forgotten or ignored.

    She was born Anne Adaliza...

    Read more about Allen Raine, forgotten Welsh writer

  12. The opening of Crumlin Viaduct

    Tuesday 31 May 2011, 15:51

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    One of the most notable pieces of industrial architecture in Wales was, for many years, the famous Crumlin Viaduct. From the day that work began until the moment it was finally demolished in the 1960s, people flocked to Crumlin to see this wonder of the modern industrial age, the highest railway viaduct...

    Read more about The opening of Crumlin Viaduct

  13. The death of Lloyd George

    Friday 27 May 2011, 11:02

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    David Lloyd George was the only Welshman to have become Prime Minister of Great Britain. By the time of his death on 26 March 1945, his glory days were long past and although still a member of Parliament during most of the war years, he rarely attended the House of Commons during that time and took no...

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  14. Clough Williams-Ellis, the man who built the Prisoner's Village

    Tuesday 24 May 2011, 08:34

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Anybody visiting the Italianate village of Portmeirion in north Wales cannot fail to remember the 1960s cult TV programme The Prisoner. For a few years it was essential viewing and even now has a dedicated band of followers, many of whom regularly take trips to the strange but enchanting village where...

    Read more about Clough Williams-Ellis, the man who built the Prisoner's Village

  15. Solomon Andrews, Cardiff entrepreneur

    Monday 23 May 2011, 11:15

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    One of the great Victorian entrepreneurs, the name of Solomon Andrews has now largely disappeared from public knowledge and view. Yet this amazing man, someone who literally rose from rags to riches, epitomises the Victorian ideal of 'self help'. He was a man who carved out for himself and his family...

    Read more about Solomon Andrews, Cardiff entrepreneur

  16. Joseph Parry: a rags to riches story

    Thursday 19 May 2011, 13:09

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Joseph Parry was arguably Wales' greatest composer. When he died in 1903 his funeral procession was so long that the hearse carrying his body was only just arriving at the church door as the last members of the procession were leaving his house, a distance of over a mile.

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  17. Welsh children at war

    Wednesday 18 May 2011, 17:16

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Arguably, children - more than any other section of society - should have been aware of the nation's preparations for war during the 1930s.

    They watched the newsreel features, usually pushed in between the first and second features at the cinema, and read comics...

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  18. Domesday Reloaded reveals Welsh life in 1986

    Monday 16 May 2011, 12:55

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    An innovative BBC project that aimed to document everyday life has been revitalised.

    The BBC Domesday Project was created in 1986 to create a picture of life in Britain 900 years after William the Conqueror's original Domesday Book was completed.

    At the time the project used the cutting edge technology...

    Read more about Domesday Reloaded reveals Welsh life in 1986

  19. Antiques Roadshow coming to Aberystwyth

    Monday 16 May 2011, 11:07

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    The long-running BBC television programme Antiques Roadshow will be holding a valuation day on Thursday 9 June at Aberystwyth Arts Centre, Aberystwyth University. The doors open at 9.30am and close at 4.30pm, and entry is free.

    Some of Britain's leading antiques and fine arts specialists will be on...

    Read more about Antiques Roadshow coming to Aberystwyth

  20. WH Davies: the Welsh Super Tramp

    Friday 13 May 2011, 11:47

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Many people - in Wales, England, all over the world - are familiar with the lines:

    "What is this life if full of care
    We have no time to stand and stare."

    Some may even be able to quote the whole poem. Yet probably very few realise that the man who wrote the poem (Leisure, to give it it's proper title...

    Read more about WH Davies: the Welsh Super Tramp

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