Tagged with: food

Posts (21)

  1. Assistant Producer

    Claire Hill was Assistant Producer on Larkin and Dale’s Takeaway Revolution and writes about filming the series.

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  2. Presenter

    Michela Chiappa on life - and cuisine - the Welsh Italian community in the Welsh Valleys

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  3. There's a big contrast in the weather across Wales today - The north east dry but the south west very wet and some torrential rain, especially in Pembrokeshire. The Met Office has issued an amber alert. As much as 50 to 100 mm of rain, (2 to 4 inches), is likely over the next six hours or so with a risk of flooding and treacherous driving conditions. To give you an idea of how much rain is likely, the October average rainfall for Tenby is 131.3 mm. The flood-line number is 0845 988 1188 or take a look at the Environment Agency's website. The rain will spread north this evening and clear so it will be turning much drier overnight with the wind easing. Tomorrow will bring a mixture of sunny intervals and scattered showers. Some of the showers will be heavy with a risk of thunder. Top temperatures 13 to 15 Celsius with a south to south-easterly breeze. It's a similar story for Wednesday with more persistent rain coming on Thursday although it's possible that the far north and west may escape. Friday should be dry with some mist and fog patches in the morning. Derek

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  4. I love a good food festival. Something about wandering aimlessly around a small town or village, the air filled with tempting cooking smells, colourful stalls and celebrity chefs all vying for attention. Last weekend one of the last agricultural shows of the season at Llandyfaelog in Carmarthenshire took place, together with the Ironman festival in Tenby (which caused an elaborate detour as we tried to get to Amroth for a bracing walk on Sunday). But as the summer shows and festivals pack up their tents and stalls, the food festivals are gearing up to tempt our tastebuds across Wales. Starting this weekend with the Abergavenny Food Festival. I was out interviewing Richard Arnold from the 'Proper Welsh' milk company at their brand new dairy in Whitland today for the radio programme. He's taking part in a debate at Abergavenny this Saturday about the benefits of raw milk. He fondly remembers drinking milk warm from the cow as a child and how his father would regularly steal the 'top of the milk'. Remember the days when milk came in glass bottles and you could clearly see the cream sitting on the surface? I would race my brother to the doorstep of a morning to make sure I got first shout - funny how it seemed so important at the time. Richard was explaining that commercial companies aren't allowed to sell raw (unpasteurised) milk any more but that individual farmers can sell it direct from the farm gate. You can actually order it on the internet, although as he pointed out, there's something not quite right about sending milk through the post. He thinks it unlikely that raw milk could be sold commercially again, but he's a big fan of non-homogenised milk, which still allows the cream to rise to the top. I'm no scientist, but apparently homogenisation breaks up the fat content in the milk, to make it easier for us to digest, but according to some current research, the process also removes the so-called 'good bacteria' in the milk. That's if I've understood the theory properly! Richard believes it'll make for an interesting discussion - he also mentioned that a few years ago, there were only a handful of food festivals in Wales, whereas now there are around 40 or 50 of them. This month alone sees festivals in Narberth in Pembrokeshire, Brecon, Mold, Aberystwyth and at the beginning of next month the Anglesey Oyster Festival - one that I've never been to but intend to get to one day. Abergavenny kicks the season off in style - their website is crammed full of show highlights (www.abergavennyfoodfestival.com) and quotes the Observer newspaper which claims "Abergavenny is to food as Cannes is to film". See you on the red carpet.

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  5. Autumn arrived with a vengeance in Wales last night with heavy rain and strong to severe gale force winds buffeting the country. The highest wind gusts recorded were 69mph at Mumbles Head in Swansea and also at Capel Curig in Snowdonia. The wind was strong enough to damage or even bring down a few trees, including an oak tree at Ysgol Bro Cinmeirch in Denbighshire. The damaged oak tree at Ysgol Bro Cinmeirch. Photo courtesy of Denbighshire Council While at Capel Curig in Conwy 118mm of rain (over four inches) has fallen in the last 72 hours. The September average is 226mm. Some rivers are currently swollen and the River Conwy bursts its banks in Llanrwst. The River Conwy, Llanrwst. Photos: Rob Davies A waterlogged rugby pitch at Dolgellau. Photo: Gwyneth McBurney I think we have seen the worst of the heavy rain and gales for the time being but the next 24 hours will continue to be windy with occasional blustery showers. More rain is expected in north Wales tomorrow afternoon/evening becoming heavy overnight, especially on the Snowdonia mountains. On Thursday rain will turn lighter during the day and the wind should ease as well. So not great weather this week, but longer term there is a hint of more settled weather and high pressure around the middle of the September so don't put the BBQ away just yet! Derek

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  6. It's been a wet few days in mid and north Wales with some flooding. At Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, 189.4mm of rain has fallen since the beginning of the month, more than than the February average which is 138.7mm. Some rivers are swollen and at the time of writing there are three flood warnings in ...

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  7. We've had a respite from the heavy rain today but there is more to come this evening. The Met Office has issued a warning for southern counties from Swansea across to Cardiff, Monmouthshire and The Valleys. Another 15 to 20 mm of rain is likely with 30 to 40 mm on higher ground and given t...

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  8. I've decided I don't like January - it's dark when you wake up and dark when you go home at night. Roll on Spring I say and hopefully some better weather too! The rain I promised yesterday has well and truly arrived with warnings of heavy rain up and down the country. In the 12 hours leading up to midday today, 24mm of rain has already fallen at Mumbles Head weather station in Swansea, so just under an inch. 20 mm of rain was recorded at Capel Curig in Snowdonia and there's plenty more rain to come so some large rainfall totals are expected. The heaviest rain will be in the south and west and Mid Wales. Typically 40 to 60 mm by the end of today with over 100 mm on higher ground in Powys, Ceredigion and Gwynedd. Some rivers are already swollen and at the time of writing, there are seven flood alerts in force across Wales and this number is set to rise. The River Dee at Llangollen during the floods in 2009. Image by Dave on Flickr. The reason for the current heavy rain is an active front spreading through southern England tomorrow, bringing plenty of moisture in from Atlantic. Tonight the heavy rain will ease but more heavy rain is expected tomorrow in South Wales. Based on the latest information, another 60 - 80mm of rain is predicted in the Neath, Port Talbot and Bridgend area with a risk of 100 mm (4 inches) in the south west Brecon Beacons with extensive low cloud, mist and hill fog so drive carefully. For Mid Wales, the north and east should be drier tomorrow with some drizzle in the west. Friday will bring some respite from the rain with drier, brighter conditions and the odd blustery shower. On Saturday, more rain is expected with the heaviest rain falling in the north and west accompanied by strong to gale force winds. Sunday will start wet and windy but it should turn drier and brighter during the afternoon. Take care Derek

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  9. Last year was drier than average in Wales. Dennis Smith from Llandeilo recorded just 39 inches of rain over 12 months but it's going to be anything but dry over the next few days...and we could expect to see up to 6 inches falling on higher ground. It is however going to turn milder (which wi...

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  10. One of the biggest problems the families struggled with wasn't the animals, and it wasn't the tough dawn to dusk work routine. It was the food. With limited supplies, generous helpings of offal, no supermarket to pop out to and every meal having to be prepared from scratch, Alisa and Catrin face...

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