Tagged with: Castles

Posts (10)

  1. Over the next two weekends two of the most picturesque spots in south Wales will be transformed into cinemas as part of a series of public film screening events.

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  2. No-one who has ever driven past Cardiff on the M4 can have failed to spot the fairytale castle that sits high up on the hillside, looking for all the world as if it had just fallen out of Cinderella's most imaginative dream.

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  3. The City and County of Swansea together with the Friends of Oystermouth Castle are looking to produce a 2013 calendar for Oystermouth Castle, that features photographs of the castle taken by the public. Oystermouth Castle They are looking for recent, as well as past photographs of the Oystermouth Castle to create a calendar that will be sold at the castle when it reopens in June, and a few outlets in the Mumbles area through the summer. Andrea Clenton, project manager for Oystermouth Castle said: "We've seen lots of stunning photos of the castle, and we're sure that visitors over the last few years will have their own memories and photographs of this magnificent structure. If you have any that you'd like to submit for possible inclusion, then we'd love to see them." Photos sent in will be added to a slideshow of images on the Oystermouth Castle website, with the very best being appearing in the calendar. If you would like your photograph of Oystermouth Castle to be considered for the calendar, email the picture to marketing@swansea.gov.uk. If your photo is chosen for inclusion in the calendar, you will receive a credit your photograph and as well as a printed version of the calendar. The competition closes at the end of April 2012. Oystermouth Castle was founded by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle early in the 12th century. The well-preserved castle stands on a small hill with a magnificent view over Swansea Bay in the resort town of Mumbles. Work began on Oystermouth Castle in the autumn of 2010 to undertake essential works to conserve the castle structure. The castle interior has a 30-foot high glass viewing platform The castle temporarily re-opened last summer complete with new visitor facilities, an educational space and a 30 foot high glass viewing platform and bridge that leads to Alina's Chapel. The completion of ongoing conservation works at the attraction will soon allow people to explore parts of the castle that have been inaccessible for generations. The majority of work was originally scheduled to be complete in 2014 but funds from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Visit Wales mean contractors are aiming for an end of May finish. The castle is due to re-open on the Saturday 16 June 2012 with a medieval tournament. Find our more about the competiton and events taking place at Oystermouth Castle on the City and County of Swansea website.

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  4. At the end of this month, Swansea Castle is being opened up for public tours. It's only the third time in decades that people will have the chance to explore the historic building. Swansea Castle (Photo: City and County of Swansea) The castle is being opened up for public tours on Saturday 25 and Sunday 26 February as part of Swansea Council's St David's Week celebrations. Visitors will be able to access parts of the castle including the whole of the first floor, several vaulted rooms of the medieval castle and the cells of the 18th century prison. Swansea Castle was originally founded in about 1106 by Henry de Beaumont, who was later given the Lordship of Gower by King Henry I. It originally consisted of earthworks and timber defences. After various unsuccessful attacks by the Welsh, the castle fell in 1217 but was restored to the English in 1220. William de Braose III built the new castle that survives today at the end of the 13th century as a set of private apartments for his family and himself that was later crowned by its distinctive battlements. The building has served many purposes over the centuries including a barracks and a drill hall. The surrounding buildings were badly damaged in the blitz of 1941 but today you can still see the tower containing the debtor's prison and William de Braose's new castle built within a corner of a walled bailey. If you would like to tour Swansea Castle, please visit www.swansea.gov.uk/swanseacastletour to book a tour.

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  5. Oystermouth Castle re-opens to the public this Saturday (16 July) after undergoing a £1.7m makeover. Live medieval music, falconry and archery displays will form part of the family fun day. The castle, which sits majestically overlooking Swansea Bay at Mumbles, was established by William De L...

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  6. Today's Daily Post carries an interesting story on the scrapping of a re-enactment of the English storming Conwy Castle. The event, organised by the town's Chamber of Commerce, was due to take place on Saturday 4 June to mark the 610th anniversary of the English forces' successful taking of t...

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  7. The future of two extremely rare William Burges-designed stained glass panels has been secured following their purchase for £125,000 by Cadw, the Welsh Assembly Government's historic environment service. Cadw's Inspector of Ancient Monuments , Rick Turner, with the two panels The panels, which were once part of a set of 20 for the chapel at Castell Coch near Cardiff, will go on public display at the fairytale castle in the summer. Burges designed a timber-framed chapel springing out of the roof of the Well Tower which was fitted with the stained glass panels. The chapel was demolished sometime before 1891 and the 20 panels were recorded as being stored on site in 1901. Castle Coch, near Cardiff Ten of those panels are on display in a gallery at Cardiff Castle while eight more are displayed in a model of the chapel in the attic room of Castell Coch's Well Tower. The whereabouts of the two missing panels had been a mystery until they failed to sell at an auction last year. Rick Turner, Cadw's Inspector of Ancient Monuments, said: "The panels show a variety of Welsh and British saints and key biblical figures and are of the highest quality Victorian stained glass. William Burges' work attracts enormous worldwide attention and the price reflects the artistic genius of the man and the rare quality of these glass panels." Speaking about the acquisition, Alun Ffred Jones, Heritage Minister, added: "I am pleased Cadw has been able to secure these important glass panels which now means all 20 original panels are back in Wales for the first time for over a century." Find out more about Welsh castles on the BBC Wales History website.

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  8. When we have visitors come to stay, friends or relatives who have, perhaps, never been to Wales before, one of the first things many of us do is take them out to see some of the majestic ruined castles that still dominate our landscape. Caerphilly Castle. Photograph by Somira Jain. Th...

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  9. A new survey by Visit Britain's suggests that Welsh castles are the main draw for foreign visitors to Britain. Caerphilly Castle. Image by Sam Pritchard. Researchers spoke to 10,000 holidaymakers from overseas, who put a tour of Welsh castles as their "must-do" activity on any trip to ...

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  10. CADW, the historic environment service of the Welsh Assembly Government, has purchased a hotel next to Harlech Castle in Gwynedd. The purchase of the hotel and car park, near historic fortress has been supported by the Welsh Assembly Government's £19m Heritage Tourism Project (HTP) and is backed...

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