Tagged with: Wales

508 posts about Wales on this blog

  1. The history of the Royal Welsh Show

    Thursday 14 July 2011, 14:15

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    No doubt about it. You either love the Royal Welsh Show and can happily spend hours wandering around the show ground every July - or you hate it with a vengeance and sit there, in your car, fuming as you try to navigate your way around Builth Wells. Whichever category you fall into, one thing is sure...

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  2. Oystermouth Castle re-opens to the public with family fun day

    Thursday 14 July 2011, 12:23

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    Oystermouth Castle re-opens to the public this Saturday (16 July) after undergoing a £1.7m makeover. Live medieval music, falconry and archery displays will form part of the family fun day.

    The castle, which sits majestically overlooking Swansea Bay at Mumbles, was established by William De Londres...

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  3. Cwmbran manor house to open as heritage centre

    Thursday 14 July 2011, 10:50

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    Llanyrafon Manor, a 17th century grade II-listed manor house in Cwmbran, is set to become a bustling town centre tourist attraction celebrating the history of the local area.

    The manor was damaged by fire and fell into disrepair in the 1970s, but was saved and run as a farming museum in the 1980s. After...

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  4. Valleys Kids launch The Factory

    Thursday 7 July 2011, 12:16

    James McLaren James McLaren

    One of Wales' iconic buildings, the old Welsh Hills Works site in Porth, has been taken over by a charity who will be launching it as The Factory later this month.

    "The aim of the project will be to develop the building as a creative hub for enterprising young people who are involved, or would like...

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  5. The Cardiff Blitz

    Friday 1 July 2011, 11:48

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    When war broke out in September 1939, Cardiff docks constituted the biggest coal exporting port in the United Kingdom, maybe even the world.

    Sitting on the flat coastal plain below the twin Rhondda valleys, Cardiff sent out a much greater tonnage of coal than any other British...

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  6. Wales and the world's first passenger helicopter service

    Wednesday 29 June 2011, 16:15

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    These days we regularly see helicopters flashing over head and think nothing more about it but in the immediate post-war days, helicopters were a rare sight in the skies above Britain.

    So, it comes as something of a surprise to find that the world's first scheduled passenger helicopter service took...

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  7. Dic Penderyn, the Welsh Martyr

    Tuesday 28 June 2011, 11:58

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the early summer of 1831, many of the the towns and villages of industrial Wales were marked by political and social unrest.

    Terrible working conditions in the mines and iron works of the country were made even worse by wage cuts and, in some cases, by the laying off of men as demand for iron and...

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  8. The opening of Holyhead's new harbour

    Monday 20 June 2011, 09:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    On 17 June 1880, the tiny north Wales town and port of Holyhead was suddenly filled, almost overwhelmed, by thousands of visitors and dignitaries. They had come to watch and applaud as the Prince of Wales formally opened the port's new harbour and hotel.

    The occasion was a dramatic and important one...

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  9. The Thetis disaster

    Wednesday 15 June 2011, 09:09

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    The North Wales coast has seen many shipping disasters over the years but none more tragic than the loss of the brand new submarine HMS "Thetis" in the summer of 1939. The submarine was on her maiden voyage and 99 men died when she sank in the waters of Liverpool Bay, just 15 miles to the east of Llandudno...

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  10. The Welsh Houdini

    Thursday 9 June 2011, 16:50

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the last years of the 19th century and in that short, seemingly idyllic period before the outbreak of World War One, the fame of one small man from Merionethshire was so great that newspapers all over the country led with tales of his exploits. Postcard publishers happily produced visual records of...

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  11. Choir's clock a window into the industrial past

    Thursday 9 June 2011, 11:54

    James McLaren James McLaren

    An extraordinary tale of a working men's male voice choir in the 19th century has come to light thanks to a hitherto unknown clock.

    Penrhyn Male Voice Choir, based in Bethesda in north west Wales, have come into possession of a decorative timepiece made in 1893 and forming part of the narrative of a...

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  12. "Hopefully in five years' time, people will have got fed up of X-Factor"

    Wednesday 1 June 2011, 16:02

    James McLaren James McLaren

    "It's going to be difficult to keep this positive!" said Graeme Park to me as we wandered, post-interview, back into the grand foyer of the new Creative Industries Centre of Glyndŵr University. Graeme, a DJ of international repute, is a lecturer at Glyndŵr, and is the host of a series of seminars that...

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  13. The opening of Crumlin Viaduct

    Tuesday 31 May 2011, 15:51

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    One of the most notable pieces of industrial architecture in Wales was, for many years, the famous Crumlin Viaduct. From the day that work began until the moment it was finally demolished in the 1960s, people flocked to Crumlin to see this wonder of the modern industrial age, the highest railway viaduct...

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  14. Clough Williams-Ellis, the man who built the Prisoner's Village

    Tuesday 24 May 2011, 08:34

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Anybody visiting the Italianate village of Portmeirion in north Wales cannot fail to remember the 1960s cult TV programme The Prisoner. For a few years it was essential viewing and even now has a dedicated band of followers, many of whom regularly take trips to the strange but enchanting village where...

    Read more about Clough Williams-Ellis, the man who built the Prisoner's Village

  15. The history of Whitchurch Hospital in Cardiff

    Tuesday 10 May 2011, 15:18

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Most people in Cardiff know of Whitchurch Hospital. The huge and elegant buildings lie alongside one of the main roads into the city and, while many of those who come to Cardiff to work or shop may never have entered the place, they will certainly have seen the buildings from the upper deck of their...

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  16. John Poyer, the forgotten hero (or villain) of the civil war

    Monday 9 May 2011, 13:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    When you think of the Civil War, the great rebellion against the crown that took place in the 17th century, you tend to think only of famous men like Charles I and Oliver Cromwell. Yet the war was organised and fought by dozens of less well-known individuals, all of whom contributed, in lesser or greater...

    Read more about John Poyer, the forgotten hero (or villain) of the civil war

  17. The Milford Haven waterway

    Monday 18 April 2011, 11:47

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    No feature on the entire Welsh coastline is more remarkable or more fascinating than the sunken valley of Milford Haven.

    Shakespeare, while he may not have visited the area, certainly knew of it. In Cymbeline he wrote about the ria (to give the waterway its correct geological name):

    "Tell me how Wales...

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  18. Catch up with Phil Carradice on the One Show

    Thursday 14 April 2011, 11:30

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    BBC Wales History blogger Phil Carradice joined The One Show's roving reporter Angelica Bellto talk about last invasion of Britain in 1797. It took place in west Wales when 1,400 members of the French Légion Noire landed on the Pencaer Peninsula just outside Fishguard.

    You can watch Phil's debut on...

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  19. Disaster on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

    Wednesday 6 April 2011, 11:47

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    A trip up Mount Snowdon, the highest mountain in Wales and England, is an experience not to be missed. For those who are fit enough, and have the energy, there are several possible routes and the sense of achievement when the summit is finally reached should never be underestimated.

    Read more about Disaster on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

  20. Cardiff's history brought to life in new museum

    Friday 1 April 2011, 01:00

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    A new museum dedicated to the history of Cardiff officially opens today, Friday 1 April.

    Told through a number of themes, The Cardiff Story will show how much the city has changed over the last 200 years.

    The new museum is located on the site of the iconic Victorian...

    Read more about Cardiff's history brought to life in new museum

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