Tagged with: Transport

33 posts about Transport on this blog

  1. The Abergele railway disaster

    Thursday 19 September 2013, 17:26

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    The Abergele Rail Disaster was an incident that destroyed much of the complacency surrounding rail travel and it took 33 lives.

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  2. The Barry railway scrapyard

    Thursday 18 July 2013, 16:50

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Railway enthusiasts quickly realised what a goldmine there was in Barry and flocked to the area in their thousands. And it was not just railway buffs.

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  3. The Great Western Railway creates standard time

    Wednesday 5 September 2012, 16:30

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Until the final years of the 18th century there was no such thing as standard time in Britain. In each town across the country the time of day was decided, firstly, by the simple process of consulting a sun dial and then by the creation of local time.

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  4. The world's first passenger hovercraft

    Thursday 19 July 2012, 10:04

    James Roberts James Roberts

    Half a century ago the future of transport appeared on a beach in north Wales. The hovercraft service from Rhyl to Moreton beach, Merseyside - the first of its kind in the world - was unleashed to masses of enthralled onlookers. This was the way forward - or so it seemed.

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  5. It happened over Christmas

    Thursday 22 December 2011, 09:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Christmas has always been a time for families, for gathering together around the fire and enjoying the warmth of human contact. In the halls and round houses of the Celts, in the castles and grand houses of the invading Normans, in the burgeoning villages and towns with their wattle and daub buildings...

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  6. William Madocks and the Cob at Porthmadog

    Tuesday 6 December 2011, 11:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Born on 17 June 1773, William Madocks was a Georgian entrepreneur of startling ability and foresight.

    He was the man who built the Cob across the Glaslyn Estuary, thus considerably easing travel - by foot, horse and eventually by rail - between mid and north Wales. He was also instrumental in creating...

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  7. Bill Frost - the first man to fly?

    Thursday 20 October 2011, 12:41

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Wilbur and Orville Wright are commonly accepted as the first men to design and fly a power-driven aeroplane. But there was one man, in west Wales, who might just have beaten the brothers to the punch. His name was Bill Frost and in the eyes of many he is the person who deserves the epithet of 'the first...

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  8. 'Wales breaks its silence...' at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

    Friday 7 October 2011, 11:58

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    Fifty-three Welsh Italians perished on the SS Arandora Star in 1940. The liner was transporting German and Italian internees along with prisoners of war to internment camps in Canada.

    The Arandora Star, which previously operated as a cruise ship, had been commandeered by the Admiralty...

    Read more about 'Wales breaks its silence...' at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

  9. The Llandow air disaster

    Thursday 6 October 2011, 16:18

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the years after World War Two there was a surge in demand for air travel. Numerous private companies, many operating aircraft that had been sold off as surplus to requirements after the war, were established when people began to realise that travel by aeroplane really was something that was available...

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  10. The end of the Conway

    Wednesday 5 October 2011, 11:50

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    The coastline of Wales has seen thousands of shipwrecks over the years but none is more interesting than that of the famous boys' training ship Conway which went ashore in the Menai Straits on 14 April 1953. The Conway was an old wooden battleship, one of many once used to train boys for careers afloat...

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  11. Tanker disasters

    Monday 26 September 2011, 14:52

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Pembrokeshire has always had its fair share of shipwrecks. In the days of sail it was inevitable that, with a westerly wind driving frail schooners and ketches onto the rugged coast, maritime disasters of one sort or another were bound to happen.

    And when the oil industry came to Milford Haven...

    Read more about Tanker disasters

  12. Museum prepares to show underwater footage of 1859 Royal Charter shipwreck

    Monday 12 September 2011, 11:21

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    From next month, visitors to Chester Grosvenor Museum will be able to view underwater video footage of one of Wales' most notable shipwrecks.

    On 26 October 1859, a steam clipper called Royal Charter, was returning from Melbourne to Liverpool. Laden with gold, the vessel was battered by a force 12 hurricane...

    Read more about Museum prepares to show underwater footage of 1859 Royal Charter shipwreck

  13. The flying boats of Pembroke Dock

    Wednesday 3 August 2011, 14:50

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    In the 1930s and 40s one west Wales town played host to the largest flying boat base the country had ever seen - maybe even the world. That town was Pembroke Dock and for nearly 30 years residents of the community woke each morning and went to bed at night with the deep throated roar of Pegasus engines...

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  14. Wales and the world's first passenger helicopter service

    Wednesday 29 June 2011, 16:15

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    These days we regularly see helicopters flashing over head and think nothing more about it but in the immediate post-war days, helicopters were a rare sight in the skies above Britain.

    So, it comes as something of a surprise to find that the world's first scheduled passenger helicopter service took...

    Read more about Wales and the world's first passenger helicopter service

  15. The Montague on Lundy

    Wednesday 22 June 2011, 15:02

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    Lundy Island, that knotted fist of rock set in the Bristol Channel, is not really a Welsh island at all. It actually belongs - postally at least - to Devon. But so many Welsh men and women, boys and girls, took trips there in the days when the White Funnel Fleet regularly patrolled up and down the Channel...

    Read more about The Montague on Lundy

  16. The opening of Holyhead's new harbour

    Monday 20 June 2011, 09:00

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    On 17 June 1880, the tiny north Wales town and port of Holyhead was suddenly filled, almost overwhelmed, by thousands of visitors and dignitaries. They had come to watch and applaud as the Prince of Wales formally opened the port's new harbour and hotel.

    The occasion was a dramatic and important one...

    Read more about The opening of Holyhead's new harbour

  17. The Thetis disaster

    Wednesday 15 June 2011, 09:09

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    The North Wales coast has seen many shipping disasters over the years but none more tragic than the loss of the brand new submarine HMS "Thetis" in the summer of 1939. The submarine was on her maiden voyage and 99 men died when she sank in the waters of Liverpool Bay, just 15 miles to the east of Llandudno...

    Read more about The Thetis disaster

  18. Disaster on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

    Wednesday 6 April 2011, 11:47

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    A trip up Mount Snowdon, the highest mountain in Wales and England, is an experience not to be missed. For those who are fit enough, and have the energy, there are several possible routes and the sense of achievement when the summit is finally reached should never be underestimated.

    Read more about Disaster on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

  19. The Mumbles Railway

    Thursday 24 March 2011, 14:34

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    There are many significant dates in Welsh history, moments that we should remember and celebrate, but one that seems to have slipped under the radar - at least for lots of people - is 25 March. For on that momentous day in 1807 the Mumbles Railway opened, the first fee paying passenger railway service...

    Read more about The Mumbles Railway

  20. Gwynedd Museum and Art Gallery appeals for HMS Clio memorabilia

    Monday 17 January 2011, 12:10

    BBC Wales History BBC Wales History

    Gwynedd Museum and Art Gallery in Bangor are appealing for families with naval connections to help provide memorabilia for an exhibition currently being curated on HMS Clio.

    The HMS Clio is a former naval gunship that was moored off Bangor pier in Gwynedd for over 40 years...

    Read more about Gwynedd Museum and Art Gallery appeals for HMS Clio memorabilia

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