Blog posts by year and month May 2010

Posts (111)

  1. There is a chill in the air again today and it was certainly cold in Mid Wales. Last night at Tirabad in Powys, the temperature dropped to -4 Celsius, 25 Fahrenheit - making it the coldest May night there since 1996! Gardeners need to be on their guard again tonight because more frost is expected. Tomorrow night, though, will be different; cloudy and milder with outbreaks of rain. And then over the weekend, some ground frost is likely in places but next week will become warmer with south-westerly winds. Derek

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  2. As the new Doctor continues his adventures with companion Amy Pond, discover some of the wonderfully Welsh locations used in filming the iconic BBC sci-fi series. We recently launched a Doctor Who in Wales locations map on the BBC Wales Arts site, where you can discover locations and places right across Wales that have been used to create Doctor Who, from the 1960s right up to the present day. Matt Smith in Doctor Who: The Eleventh Hour, partly filmed in Llandaff village in Cardiff © BBC/Adrian Rogers.

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  3. Over 1,000 fans of BBC One show Over The Rainbow took part in a sing-along event at Cardiff's St David's Hall on Sunday. Some fans queued from as early as 8am to take part in the musical masterclass alongside ex-Dorothys from the show and I'd Do Anything winner, Jodie Prenger. Participants at the Over The Rainbow event in St David's Hall, Cardiff.

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  4. Have you ever wondered where some of the words, phrases or sayings that we now use actually originated? For example, many of us often light bonfires in our gardens. But where did the word come from? In the Middle Ages it was quite normal to dig up people's bones after 30 or 40 years in order to...

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  5. Phil Carradice has written a fascinating article on Welsh one-hit-wonders for the BBC Wales Music site. From Ricky Valence's death ballad Tell Laura I Love Her, to Tammy Jones' cracking version of Let Me Try Again, find out about these temporary chart toppers on BBC Wales Music. Read the article.

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  6. 'The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path National trail' or as most of us know it, the Pembrokeshire coastal footpath celebrates it's 40th birthday. It's officially forty years since walkers started to explore Pembrokeshire's natural wonders and scenic beauty by following its coastal path Incredibly it stretches for 186 miles, from Amroth in the south to St Dogmael's near Cardigan in the north. Walkers enjoying the coastal path near Skomer Island. Image by Dave Maclachlan - PCNPA: The path was opened in May 1970, after 17 years of preparation to secure a continuous route along the coast, including the installation over 100 bridges and thousands of steps. Since then the CCW and the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority have continued to work with local partners to maintain and improve the routes and open them to everyone. Over 400 stiles have been removed in the last 10 years to make the path easier and more accessible which can only be a good thing for walkers. The 42 mile section between Pembroke Dock and Nolton Haven is now stile free! Enjoying the scenery near St Govans. Image by Dave Maclachlan - PCNPA: Don't panic if you're not up to doing the full 186 miles either! You can do it in chunks and hop on the coastal cruiser buses in between so pick and choose your routes. A favourite of is mine is the section between Freshwater East and Barafundle Bay but on a nice sunny day it all looks amazing. The path has recently been voted 'Britain's best coastal path' by the readers of Coast Magazine and around 900,000 people use the routes daily providing a massive boost to the local economy and businesses. Taking in the views at Porth Egr. Image by Dave Maclachlan - PCNPA: Things to look out for whilst walking the trails this summer: 300 million year old rocks and the coloured, textured and patterned cliffs. Amazing views courtesy of the large headlands and little promontories across wide bays, sandy coves and deep estuaries. Many species of flowers - including thrift, sea campion, sea plantain, spring squill, bird's foot trefoil, kidney vetch while grasses such as red fescue form a soft springy turf. Birds including razorbills, guillemots, kittiwakes, fulmars, gulls, shags, cormorants, rare choughs and peregrine falcons. The tidal mudflats in Angle Bay and Pembroke River host many waders and duck. There's plenty of history too - old chapels, Iron Age hillforts, Bronze Age burial cairns, Norman castles and Victorian maritime forts. Find some interesting places to visit in South West Wales on the BBC Wales Nature portal. Use our wildlife guides to spot the bird life. Gull

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  7. Our BBC Wales History blogger Phil Carradice is usually to be found talking about battles, bottles and banks but in a one-off entry for us, he's taken a look at Welsh one-hit-wonders. Read on to find out about three Welsh singers whose career never lived up to their initial success...

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  8. I've had a few lively discussions with a familiar face on the South Wales rock circuit at a few gigs recently, Scott Lee Andrews. Scott's name kept cropping up in my recent research into south Wales rock and rightly so: he has been a vital part of the scene since the forming and relentless gi...

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  9. For all you fans of men in tights shooting baddies with bows and arrows - the wait is almost over! The Ridley Scott Hollywood blockbuster Robin Hood starring Russell Crowe is being released in cinemas across the UK tomorrow on Wednesday, 12 May. The film makers found the perfect location for their epic adventure right here in Wales in Pembrokeshire. The National Trust's beach at Freshwater West was used to help create a major battle scene in the film. 600 extras and 150 horses staged an impressive Robin Hood battle scene on the beach which represented the south coast of England, where a climactic battle scene complete with longboats and medieval landing craft took place right on the beach. Image courtesy of the National Trust: Nearby an outcrop of soft cliff to the south of Freshwater West stood in for the Brittany coast off France. Extensive unit bases - including temporary stabling for the horses were erected, as well as replicating the historic seaweed drying hut above Middle Bay with several more, to create Breton peasant hovels. Mike Davies was on hand to snap a few pics too: The National Trust's Head Warden Richard Ellis said "The dunes, which are a sensitive area of wildflowers and ground-nesting birds, had visitor pressure taken off them for a month because of security during filming, so, environmentally it was also a huge success. We would love to have the film crew back." Another pic from Mike Davies showing the longboats coming ashore: Take a look at our Robin Hood photo gallery courtesy of our man at the beach - 'Scotty' who was on hand to capture exclusive pictures for me during filming last year. I came so close to being an extra in it too..I made it through the auditions and if I'd just managed to get the time off work for filming - I could have been in a Hollywood blockbuster! Ah well, it'll be fun seeing friends from Pembrokeshire 'taking some arrows' as extras in some of the battle scenes. Gull

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  10. You may have heard the old saying 'Ne'er cast a clout till May be out'. It's been in use since at least the 18th century. A clout is an old word for a piece of clothing. Some people think 'May' refers to the month but others take it to mean the May flower or hawthorn. The tree flowers in late April or early May. In other words, the old saying means don't take your warm clothes off until the May blossom is out because cold weather can return during the spring months which is what is happening at the moment. Hawthorn blossom by Oakwoodlot on Flickr: The air over has come from the Arctic bringing a drop in temperature. Ann Ankers from Bwlchgwyn near Wrexham said she had sleet this morning with a temperature of only 2 Celsius. Bwlchgwyn is 1090 feet above sea level but it goes to show how cold the air is. Some frost is likely over the next few nights, especially in the countryside and rural areas. Of course, cold snaps are not uncommon in May. Thankfully, it should become a little warmer over the weekend and next week but in the meantime keep your vest and scarf handy and watch out for jack frost. Derek

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