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Phil Carradice Phil Carradice Delve into the rich history of Wales – from ancient myths and legends right up to the present. Blog posts in total 408

  1. The fortifications of Milford Haven

    Thursday 18 April 2013, 11:58

    The fortifications of Milford Haven are, largely, still there. They are grey and stately, solid and dependable, typical 19th century military buildings.

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  2. The Welshman who helped Alf Ramsey win the World Cup

    Friday 12 April 2013, 10:14

    John Elsworthy might be regarded as the best Welsh footballer never to gain an international cap for his country.

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  3. Desmond Donnelly, mercurial but doomed

    Tuesday 9 April 2013, 15:44

    If ever there was a man who promised much but failed to live up to his massive potential it was former Pembrokeshire MP Desmond Donnelly.

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  4. Idris Davies, poet of the Depression

    Saturday 6 April 2013, 09:00

    One man who tried to chart or capture the suffering that the people of the Welsh valleys endured - was the poet Idris Davies.

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  5. The city of St Asaph

    Thursday 4 April 2013, 16:35

    The modern city of St Asaph sits on the River Elwy (the place is called Llanelwy in Welsh) in Denbighshire.

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  6. Eisenhower goes west

    Wednesday 3 April 2013, 17:18

    General Dwight D Eisenhower was not, generally, regarded as a great soldier. But he was the supreme diplomat.

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  7. The Black Death hits Wales

    Wednesday 27 March 2013, 11:13

    The Black Death - the plague or the Great Mortality as it was otherwise known – decimated Europe in the 14th century, killing somewhere in the region of 25 million people in the two years between its first appearance in 1348 and 1350.

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  8. Thisbe - the Welsh Gospel Ship

    Monday 25 March 2013, 13:00

    The Thisbe was a 46-gun frigate launched from Pembroke Dock in 1824.

    Read more about Thisbe - the Welsh Gospel Ship

  9. The Boy Stood on the Burning Deck

    Tuesday 19 March 2013, 10:53

    One of the most popular poems in the Victorian Age - for recitation and for private reading - was undoubtedly Casabianca or, as it is invariably known, "The boy stood on the burning deck."

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  10. The people's poets of Wales

    Friday 15 March 2013, 10:17

    It might be something of a generalization but, from the early days of the princes, the Welsh have always enjoyed poetry and revered their bards.

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  11. The life and times of Ivor Emmanuel

    Monday 11 March 2013, 16:51

    The son of a miner, Ivor Emmanuel was orphaned during World War Two when a stray German bomb killed his father, mother, grandfather and sister.

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  12. There's gold in them there hills

    Thursday 7 March 2013, 15:58

    Gold had been mined in Wales since Roman times, possibly even before.

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  13. The coracles of Wales

    Monday 4 March 2013, 12:34

    Coracles, small river craft that were used for fishing and, occasionally, for transport, were once found throughout Britain.

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  14. Arthur Machen, the first modern horror writer

    Sunday 3 March 2013, 09:00

    For a brief period at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries, Arthur Machen was one of the most significant writers in the country.

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  15. The leek, national emblem of Wales

    Thursday 28 February 2013, 11:03

    The Welsh have two national emblems, not counting the blood-red dragon - the leek and the daffodil. The daffodil is a relatively new addendum but the leek has been around for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.

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  16. John Nash, Welsh architect

    Tuesday 26 February 2013, 11:50

    John Nash was perhaps the most famous architect of the 18th and early 19th centuries. He is remembered now for his work on Buckingham Palace, Regent's Park and Regent Street in London.

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  17. The Glyndŵr rebellion

    Monday 25 February 2013, 09:29

    The one name from history that most Welsh people readily acknowledge is that of Owain Glyndŵr.

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  18. Near disaster in the Bristol Channel

    Friday 22 February 2013, 09:22

    For several years two state-of-the-art paddlers ploughed up and down the channel, regularly calling at places such as Penarth Pier, Mumbles Pier, Barry and the pier head in Cardiff.

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  19. The Cardiff Pals

    Wednesday 20 February 2013, 17:15

    At the end of August 1914 Lord Kitchener called for a further 100,000 volunteers to form what he termed "a New Army" to give extra weight to the armed forces.

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  20. A pier at war

    Thursday 14 February 2013, 12:19

    Lots of things get requisitioned in time of war - land, vehicles, even animals. But an old Victorian pleasure pier? True, it really happened in the south Wales seaside resort of Penarth.

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Behind the scenes on our biggest shows, the stories you won't see on TV & highlights from Welsh history, arts and music.

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