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Phil Carradice Phil Carradice Delve into the rich history of Wales – from ancient myths and legends right up to the present. Blog posts in total 408

  1. Christopher Williams: local boy makes good

    Friday 4 March 2011, 10:22

    Take a trip to the Town Hall in Maesteg. Quite apart from the wonders of the building and the intricate clock mechanism high above the Hall, here you will find six startling paintings by one of Wales' greatest artists, the Maesteg-born Christopher Williams.

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  2. What else happened on St David's Day?

    Monday 28 February 2011, 08:32

    The first of March is arguably the most famous and important day in Welsh history and culture.

    It is, of course, St David's Day and all over the country celebrations - usually in the shape of eisteddfodau or arts festivals - take place. They are held in schools, in colleges, in chapels...

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  3. World records on the sands at Pendine

    Friday 25 February 2011, 10:57

    The rock hard sands at Pendine stretch for over seven miles along the shore of Carmarthen Bay, running between Laugharne Sands in the east and the village of Pendine itself in the west.

    These days they are an ideal tourist location where sand castles and walks...

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  4. The last invasion of Britain

    Monday 21 February 2011, 13:44

    Ask the average man or woman in the street when Britain was last invaded and the answer will probably be "1066". In fact the response would be wrong by about 700 years.

    The last time any invaders foot ever stood upon the soil of mainland Britain was...

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  5. Augustus John, bohemian and painter

    Tuesday 15 February 2011, 09:54

    One of the most eccentric and fascinating characters ever to come out of Wales, the painter Augustus John, was a Pembrokeshire man through and through.

    Even after he grew up and achieved international fame he often returned to the county of his birth, affording it a warm and fond place...

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  6. Ernest Jones, the biographer of Sigmund Freud

    Thursday 10 February 2011, 10:24

    The name Alfred Ernest Jones might mean very little to most people but, for some time, this enigmatic and fascinating man was the leader of the psychoanalytical movement in Britain and many years later was voted number 96 in the list of top 100 Welshmen of all time.

    Perhaps more importantly, Ernest...

    Read more about Ernest Jones, the biographer of Sigmund Freud

  7. Castles of conquest and oppression

    Tuesday 8 February 2011, 16:24

    When we have visitors come to stay, friends or relatives who have, perhaps, never been to Wales before, one of the first things many of us do is take them out to see some of the majestic ruined castles that still dominate our landscape.

    This is Wales...

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  8. How public was the public house?

    Friday 4 February 2011, 09:05

    It's a sad fact that the good, old fashioned public house was, for many years, far less public than most of us ever imagined.

    Half of the population of Britain was actually banned from many of these establishments, purely on the grounds of gender, and...

    Read more about How public was the public house?

  9. The man who invented the death ray

    Wednesday 2 February 2011, 09:56

    Think of it, the classic eccentric inventor, the man who designed and built a death ray and a sky projector for flashing messages onto the clouds - Batman or what? - and he's just moved into a house situated outside your home town.

    Read more about The man who invented the death ray

  10. The death of the British pub

    Friday 28 January 2011, 14:18

    It's a sad fact that upwards of 30 public houses are closing down every week in Britain.

    Other countries might have their taverns, beer halls or bars but the humble British pub has always been something of an institution, an establishment unique to this country.

    Every town or village once had one...

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  11. Peerless Jim Driscoll

    Monday 24 January 2011, 12:25

    Wales has produced many great boxers over the years but none was more respected and loved than Peerless Jim Driscoll, the Cardiff featherweight who once gave up the chance of winning the world title because he had made a promise to take part in a charity show for his local orphanage.

    Jim Driscoll died...

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  12. The Treason of the Blue Books

    Friday 21 January 2011, 13:02

    In the year 1847 the British government commissioned a report into the state of education in Wales.

    Not, in itself, such a momentous event, but when the remit of the report was widened to include a study of the morals of the Welsh people it resulted in a furore that still rumbles on to this very day...

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  13. Robert Owen, socialist and visionary

    Friday 21 January 2011, 08:41

    Robert Owen is now something of a forgotten figure. Yet this far-sighted visionary, a man who was arguably born before his time, was one of the most original thinkers ever to come out of Wales.

    He was a socialist long before the term "socialism" had ever been invented. He was also an educationalist...

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  14. The Zulu wars

    Friday 14 January 2011, 14:23

    There has always been something of a debate about the Anglo-Zulu Wars of 1879, particularly with regard to the numbers of Welsh soldiers involved in the Battle of Isandlwana and at the defense of Rorke's Drift.

    Often legend and romance have taken...

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  15. Ivor Novello, the Welsh nightingale

    Friday 14 January 2011, 12:09

    Most people have, at some stage in their lives, listened to the song Keep The Home Fires Burning. It was one of the most popular tunes in the trenches during World War One and still has the ability to bring a pang to the throat or a tear to the eye.

    Yet how many people realise that this...

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  16. The Celts

    Friday 7 January 2011, 10:23

    With the prospect of the forthcoming Six Nations Championship already beginning to loom large in people's minds, many red-blooded Welsh men and women (and Irish and Scots, too, come to that) have once again become suddenly conscious of their Celtic heritage.

    We are all of us...

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  17. Jacobites in Wales

    Thursday 6 January 2011, 10:01

    The summer of 1715. The Old Pretender is about to land with his army in Scotland, rallying supporters of the Stuart cause to his flag. George I and the whole Hanoverian dynasty appear to be resting on the edge of disaster. Discontent is rife everywhere and in the north Wales town of Wrexham, as the...

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  18. Hywel Dda - the Lawmaker of Wales

    Tuesday 4 January 2011, 09:08

    Wales is certainly not lacking when it comes to stories and tales of kings or great warriors. From the mythological heroes of the Mabinogion, where legend mixes easily with reality, to genuine historical figures like the Lord Rhys or Llywelyn the Great, there are so many to choose from. Yet one of the...

    Read more about Hywel Dda - the Lawmaker of Wales

  19. Evan Morgan of Tredegar House

    Thursday 30 December 2010, 11:48

    Of all the great characters in Welsh history - and there are many - none is more unusual, more fascinating and more downright bizarre than Evan Morgan, the last Viscount Tredegar.

    Evan succeeded to the title in 1934 but by then his reputation for outlandish behaviour had been well established. Born...

    Read more about Evan Morgan of Tredegar House

  20. The Collapse of the Cleddau Bridge

    Wednesday 29 December 2010, 09:29

    Anyone who drives up the A477 from south Pembrokeshire to the northern part of the county will pass over the magnificent structure of the Cleddau Bridge.

    They will wonder at the glorious views down Milford Haven towards the sea, but they will probably...

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Behind the scenes on our biggest shows, the stories you won't see on TV & highlights from Welsh history, arts and music.

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