Read the most recent posts

  1. The warmest Halloween on record?

    Thursday 30 October 2014, 16:33

    Derek Brockway Derek Brockway

    See all posts about:

    It's been a mild autumn so far with very little, if any, frost to speak of. Temperatures today are once again above average across the country ranging from 15-18°C and won't drop much tonight.

    Tomorrow will be even warmer, typically 17-20°C but on the north coast 21 or possibly 22°C is possible in places. This would make it the warmest Halloween on record!

    October sunrise by Ros Baylis October sunrise by Ros Baylis

    The reason for the unseasonably high temperatures is the wind direction. The wind tomorrow will be from the south bringing warm air to us all the way from Spain and Portugal.

    On the north Wales coast the temperature will be boosted by the Foehn effect whereby warm moist air blowing across the mountains dries out and warms as it descends on the other side. In North America this wind is called the Chinook.

    Over the weekend, it will turn cooler with temperatures dropping by a few degrees. It will be breezy with some dry weather and sunshine on Saturday but there is some rain on the way as well. The worst of the wet and windy weather is expected on Saturday evening and overnight, followed by brighter weather and scattered showers on Sunday.

    The highest temperature recorded in November is 21.7°C in Prestatyn...

    Read more about The warmest Halloween on record?

  2. Ghost Stories and Legends of Wales

    Thursday 30 October 2014, 12:56

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    See all posts about:

    Ghost stories are a part of our cultural heritage, tales from a long and distant past shrouded in mystery. Stories that originated so long ago it is almost impossible to separate fact from fiction.

    Before the days of radio and television, families would gather around the fire and as shadows leapt across darkened rooms and tree branches snapped against the window shutters, they would terrify each other with stories of hauntings, headless horsemen and mist-filled hollows.

    Unfortunately, most ghost and horror stories are figments of the storytellers’ imaginations and many of them have travelled the length and breadth of our country before they have finally been settled in one particular location or another. Locals will swear that they originated from and belong to their particular stretch of the land, albeit with little proof. And sometimes the same tales can be found in widely disparate parts of Wales.

    There is, for example, a wonderful tale from Amroth in Pembrokeshire where the son of an old farmer who tries to scratch out a living on the windswept coast, goes to sea to make his fortune and simply disappears from view.

    Years later a ship is sighted, beating in from the Atlantic, and...

    Read more about Ghost Stories and Legends of Wales

  3. Poets’ Graves

    Wednesday 29 October 2014, 12:12

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    See all posts about:

    You can learn a lot from the gravestones that stand proudly in our churches and graveyards. Whether they are simple slabs of marble or slate, whether they are huge gothic or neo-gothic edifices, the tombstones of our ancestors can tell us much about the character of the man or woman concerned and about the times in which they lived and died.

    The grave of poet Howell Elvet Lewis, better known by his Bardic name Elfed The grave of poet Howell Elvet Lewis, better known by his Bardic name Elfed. Photograph © Paul White

    Dates of birth and death, length of life and, if you are lucky, information about family are all often inscribed onto a person’s tombstone.

    Sometimes there is even a little humour, as in the case of Private John Harding of the Royal Marines who was killed in October 1850 when he pitched headfirst into the unfenced moat of the Defensible Barracks in Pembroke Dock. On his headstone in the old Park Street Cemetery of the town it says:-

    “Except the Lord direct our feet and guide with gracious care;

    At every step we danger meet, in every path a snare.

    Then reader, pause, whoe’er thou art, as thus my grave you view –

    Remember, thou from life must part, perhaps as quickly too.”

    “Except the Lord direct our feet and guide with gracious care...

    Read more about Poets’ Graves

  4. A mild start with drizzle on the way

    Tuesday 28 October 2014, 16:53

    Derek Brockway Derek Brockway

    See all posts about:

    The clocks may have gone back but there's no sign yet of any really cold weather. It's mild again today with temperatures reaching 15 to 18 Celsius with a south-westerly wind. A cold front is moving southeast today bringing some heavy rain with it but this front will turn around and move back northwards again tomorrow as a warm front; so although it will turn clear and chilly in the north tonight, the mild weather will return and push the cold air away.

    Forecast chart for Tuesday 28th October Forecast chart for Tuesday 28th October

    Tomorrow northern counties will enjoy a clear, dry and bright morning with sunshine to show off the...

    Read more about A mild start with drizzle on the way

  5. From Bangor to Bangalore – Houdini Dax and the Horizons experience

    Tuesday 28 October 2014, 15:30

    Owen Richards Owen Richards

    See all posts about:

    Owen Richards is the bass player for Cardiff-born band Houdini Dax, who have been chosen to be part of the Arts Council of Wales and BBC Wales Horizons scheme this year.

    Last week, we found ourselves in yet another hidden corner of Wales as part of the Horizons scheme. We had no idea what to expect from our weekend workshop in the frosty autumnal countryside. 

    As we parked up, we were greeted by a friendly, unassuming gentleman who introduced himself as Dai. He offered to show us to where everyone was staying, and so we walked with him towards the lodge. On our journey, we asked whether he worked...

    Read more about From Bangor to Bangalore – Houdini Dax and the Horizons experience

  6. Here comes The Bowles Team

    Monday 27 October 2014, 11:52

    Steve Austins Steve Austins Editor, BBC Radio Wales

    See all posts about:

    On Saturday, the Radio Wales Sport team brought us five commentaries in ten hours. On Sunday it was all about Dylan Thomas, with a stunning performance of Under Milk Wood on the New York stage where it was first performed. If you were watching Strictly, X Factor or even the Welsh BAFTAs, I forgive you – BUT you really must go back and catch it sometime over the next 30 days because it’s breathtakingly good. As is the pre-performance show which featured insights and perspectives about the poet you may never have heard.

    Lynn Bowles begins her new radio show on Sunday Lynn Bowles begins her new radio show on Sunday

    Next Sunday, the...

    Read more about Here comes The Bowles Team

  7. What did Grandad do in the war?

    Wednesday 22 October 2014, 09:50

    Cat Whiteaway Cat Whiteaway

    See all posts about:

    One of the questions I am most frequently asked is “what did my grandfather do in the war?”. Most people who have an ancestor who served during WW1 have an idea of their battalion or their service number but not always an idea of exactly where their ancestor went and which battles they fought.

    Ironically, if your ancestor died then their basic details can be traced quite quickly via the Commonwealth War Grave Commission’s website. If you're lucky then their service records will have survived the Blitz and be available in the WO 363 records held at The National Archives or via Ancestry.co...

    Read more about What did Grandad do in the war?

  8. Morgan Jones - Railway Builder

    Tuesday 21 October 2014, 13:20

    Phil Carradice Phil Carradice

    See all posts about:

    Few people in Wales will have ever heard of Morgan Jones. Yet in the late nineteenth century, this farmer's son from Tregynon near Newtown in Powys became a major hero in the State of Texas and built many of the railways - railroads as the Americans called them - that opened up in the arid deserts of the southern states. He was a self-made man with a dream and the drive to make it come true.

    Morgan Jones was born on 7 October 1839, the son of farmers Morgan and Mary Jones. From an early age, however, it was clear that farming was not for him. Coming into the world at the beginning of the...

    Read more about Morgan Jones - Railway Builder

  9. X-Ray on flaky campervans

    Monday 20 October 2014, 14:07

    Lucy Owen Lucy Owen

    See all posts about:

    I’ve always loved the idea of a campervan, having the freedom to just hop in and go wherever you want at the drop of a hat.

    I had a taste of being a campervan owner driving Molly, an early 1970s van, for this week’s X-Ray. And of course, the team weren’t likely to miss an opportunity to put me in the clobber of the time to complete the experience!

    Lucy Owen with Molly the campervan Lucy Owen with Molly the campervan

    But this campervan trip was all about getting to bottom of what was going on with other more modern vehicles in Mold.

    They were bought by their owners to liberate them, so they could enjoy travelling the...

    Read more about X-Ray on flaky campervans

  10. Llareggub in Manhattan

    Monday 20 October 2014, 12:38

    Steve Austins Steve Austins Editor, BBC Radio Wales

    See all posts about:

    Dylan Thomas. There’s a lot of him about at the moment. However, I think what we’ve got to mark the centenary of the poet’s birth this week is really rather special.

    Dylan’s Under Milk Wood was first performed in full at the 92nd Street Y Centre in New York back in 1953. In September of that year he delivered a full draft to the BBC on his way back to America. The intention was to revise it on his return, and ultimately star as First Voice. By November, he was dead.

    Dylan Thomas recording for the BBC Dylan Thomas recording for the BBC

    On Sunday night, we’re broadcasting a live performance of Under Milk Wood from...

    Read more about Llareggub in Manhattan

About this Blog

Behind the scenes on our biggest shows, the stories you won't see on TV & highlights from Welsh history, arts and music.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook for the latest posts.

Blog Updates

Stay updated with the latest posts from the blog.

Subscribe using:

What are feeds?

BBC Wales tweets