Stargazing LIVE: More secrets to be uncovered

Monday 16 January 2012, 14:48

Mark Thompson Mark Thompson Astronomer

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I have been fascinated by the night sky ever since I was a child.

I remember seeing Saturn through a telescope for the first time when I was about 10 years old, and the sight was nothing short of magical.

Seeing Saturn, rings and all, hovering against the velvet black sky ignited a fire in me that has been raging ever since.

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Stargazing series one: Jonathan meets Jupiter

There are loads of other great things coming up in the new series too and we want you to get involved.

You can send in your pictures and questions to the team and we will try to answer as many as possible in the follow-on show Stargazing LIVE: Back To Earth which happens straight after Stargazing LIVE.

There are also hundreds of events up and down the country for you to go along to.

We've also got some great new graphics plus an updated star and moon guide and loads of other resources downloadable from the website to show you what you can look for in the skies over the UK during January so you can get out and stargaze for yourselves.

Last year's show was great, even my 'missed meteor moment' was hilarious but we have loads of bigger and better things planned for this year and frankly, I can't wait for the first show.

Mark Thompson is the astronomer on Stargazing LIVE.

Series two of Stargazing LIVE begins on Monday, 16 January at 8.30pm on BBC Two and BBC HD. For further programme times, please see the upcoming epsiodes page.

On Thursday, 19 January at 2pm, Professor Brian Cox will present a live, interactive lesson from Jodrell Bank in collaboration with The Big Bang Fair. All UK schools can join in on the BBC red button.

Comments made by writers on the BBC TV blog are their own opinions and not necessarily those of the BBC.

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  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

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    Comment number 2.

    whilst we find stargazing live a great programme, is it to become yet another programme that invites the minor celebrity whom has a little interest and next to no knowledge in astronomy. There would be thousands of amatuer astronomers age 5-90 who could be invited and would get more out of it, another good programme on the way to ruin

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    Comment number 3.

    Thank you so much for returning to our screens. Makes the cold nights easier. I may have been seeing things, but in the last outside segment, at the very end, in the bottom left, was there another shooting star? Last year when it happened, I thought i would never see it again. Please check it out.

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    Comment number 4.

    Hi, I really enjoyed the show last night, great to see such enthusiasm for the subject. Not sure who Paula above means when she says 'minor celebrity whom has a little interest and next to no knowledge in astronomy' , but I think Dara injects some humour into the proceeedings (the comment 'if we're wrong about this, please email us from the future' showed real wit!), as well as showing a genuinely open mind.

    One comment I would make about last night's show however is that I was extremely surprised at the lack of respect shown to Captain Eugene Cernan in his interview. He was only allocated about 30 seconds for his interview and was cut off in the middle of what was shaping up to be a profound musing on his time on the moon. As the only person on a show purporting to focus on the moon who had actually BEEN there, I found this off-putting and disingenuous.

    I believe one of the main reasons that kids decide not to pursue scientific careers is the lack of respect shown to scientists and science by popular media and culture and this should be recitified by otherwise exemplary programmes such as Stargazing LIVE.

    my 2c.

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    Comment number 5.

    Dara's wish for a message from the future seemed to have been granted. The photo shown of the Andromeda Galaxy was dated 22/11/12!

 

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