Call The Midwife: In search of a new home

Thursday 6 February 2014, 10:51

Hannah King Hannah King Researcher

When Call The Midwife discovered their much-loved Nonnatus House (filmed at St Joseph's College in Mill Hill, London), was to be redeveloped into luxury 21st century flats, they had no other choice than to go out in search of a new home. 

Luckily the new Nonnatus House featured in series three offered plenty of advantages.

Leading cast and production team members explain how the show’s creator Heidi Thomas and production designer Eve Stewart managed to bring the show into a whole new era:

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Hugh Warren is a producer for Call The Midwife, Pippa Harris is an executive producer, Jessica Raine plays Jenny Lee and Pam Ferris plays Sister Evangelina.
 
Since settling into their brand new Nonnatus House, the cast have been eyeing up a few items from the set. They revealed which ones they’d quite like to take home:

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In order of appearance: Victoria Yeates plays Sister Winifred, Judy Parfitt plays Sister Monica Joan, Jessica Raine plays Jenny Lee, Miranda Hart plays Chummy Noakes, Helen George plays Trixie Franklin, Laura Main plays Shelagh Turner, Pam Ferris plays Sister Evangelina, Jenny Agutter plays Sister Julienne, Bryony Hannah plays Cynthia Miller.
 
These interviews were filmed by BBC Worldwide and edited by Hannah King, a researcher in BBC TV and iPlayer.

Call The Midwife continues on Sunday, 9 February at 8pm on BBC One and BBC One HD. For further programme times please see the episode guide.

More on Call The Midwife
BBC TV blog: Call The Midwife: I have the strangest job

Comments made by writers on the BBC TV blog are their own opinions and not necessarily those of the BBC.

Comments

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  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 1.

    I was intrigued where the new location was - with mention that it was "inside an F1 track".
    With a bit of searching, I think it is just left and below the M3/M25 junction at Barrow Hills Golf Course club house. This shortened Bing link shows it as it was - http://binged.it/1gPUMCc and this more recent Google link shows it with the set built around it! - https://www.google.co.uk/maps/preview/@51.3819493,-0.577694,137m/data=!3m1!1e3

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 2.

    The business about a nurse catching nits after working in prison is accurate; my grandfather was chief clerk at Leeds Prison in the 1920s and his daughter caught them and had her hair shaved off, giving rise to her nickname 'Joe'.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 3.

    we used to live in the middle of Brighton race track...until we were moved on but it was a great place to be-watching the horses racing-the centre is a surprisingly huge space and the horses were very much in the distance

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 4.

    My wife and I love CALL THE MIDWIFE, but we both feel most of the series is set in the early 1950's not the 1960's. I feel who ever wrote this must be a little miss informed.
    Terry

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 5.

    IM WAS very upset as someone whom is born disabled I foudn tonight program not amuzing I didnt like that bbc1 had called someone whom is disabled been called something which Hitter would call the children which he Murdered in his sweat house

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 6.

    @tev it is set in the 1950s not the 1960s

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 7.

    I have just argued with my family: I said call the midwife is a dramatisation and Alec's death was a bit of a lazy plot line and pretty predictable, after all the programme is unremittingly gloomy punctuated by the occasional joy of a baby's birth. They said that the programme is literally what happened to Jennifer Worth.
    Who is right?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 8.

    Thank you for tonight's story, which addressed people with learning disabilities. The acting was superb. I wept buckets and I believe prejudices still exist around them not having feelings and abilities to love as others do. I love the programme, albeit somewhat sweet, but I wouldn't miss such a beautifully presented drama. More like this please, BBC !

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 9.

    Thank you for the sensitive treatment of the challenges faced by the disabled and their supporters in a far less enlightened time. I would love to see more of Colin Young in this or other BBC dramas.
    It was jarring to hear the language used to describe them, and it helped to remind me how far we have come just in my own lifetime.
    I would point out to Connie, that Cerebral Palsy is not a learning disability. Although the muscular difficulties presented by CP make their speech difficult to understand at times, they are as intelligent, articulate and able to learn as anyone else. I am privileged to to call another Scottish actor with CP my friend, and he is one of the most intelligent people I know.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 10.

    @Keith Panda

    It's based on the memoirs of Jennifer Lee/Worth, the only way to find out if it's all in the bookS is to read them I guess!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 11.

    I cried quite a lot after the last episode, Jenny losing her boyfriend was heartbreaking. The acting in this series is absolutely superb, recorded the last show, can't wait to view it!!

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 12.

    Why do they insist on calling it "The Girls' Brigade" - when it was still "The Girls' Life Brigade" !! The uniform worn is that of the "GLB" (Girls Life Brigade). The Girls' Brigade did not come into being until 1964 when GLB amalgamated with the Girls' Guildry (Scotland) and Girls' Brigade of Ireland.
    At the time of the first mention of "Girls Brigade" in the programme - one of the actresses produced a letter dated 1959 - seems like the programme researchers were ahead of themselves!
    Pity they did not consult with the Girls' Brigade headquarters to get right information - up until now the programme had been quite believable..... now I am beginning to doubt the timelines.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 13.

    I agree with "tev" , it IS set in the early 50's, at least the earlier episodes were,,, I was born in 1954, I had the same pram and reigns as the toddler at the beginning, I wore Startrite sandals,, I joined the Girls Brigade, ( season 3) in the early 60's with exactly the same uniform, remembering the cake tins, the importance of a cake being in it, tea time, the familiar green cups and saucers, etc, so much takes me back and makes me so nostalgic. It's a wonderful series, better than Downton!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 14.

    From suze/ the word is reins!! Yes, I cried so much,,, episodes 4 and 5 were both sad, I live abroad and the series makes me "homesick",
    Excellent research and acting!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 15.

    I have read all the books. I also read an article in which Heidi said that they used most of Jennifer's stories in the early series as they didn't know that there would be more so she is having to write new stories now. Also Jennifer didn't include much about her private life eg most of the Jimmy story was newly written as was Alex. But that doesn't matter to me. I think that it is one of the very best series that I have ever seen since my parents installed television for the coronation in 1953. The individual stories may not all be 100% true but the overall picture and impression certainly is.,notwithstanding the the odd little mistake like GLB. We were lucky to live in a prefab in Dagenham from 1946 and I really had no idea of the extent of poverty in the East End then until now. Thank you BBC and everyone involved .Derek Pedder 71 and hanging on

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 16.

    tev - it is set in the 1950's not the 1960's.

    miss annastacia foster - I can appreciate your upset but remember that the series is set in the 1950's when people with disabilities were referred to by very different terms than they are now. I think the shock of hearing these antiquated terms reminds us how much times have changed, for the better.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 17.

    How about a book of "The Wit and Wisdom of Sister Monica Joan"? By the time the episode has ended I am usually googling like mad to find the source of her remarks. As for 50's or 60's, is it really that important? We know that a lot of the storylines are fluffed up but it is a nice feel good piece of entertainment, let's just enjoy.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 18.

    Oldnick -I agree

    Dukeofearl- you must be a Gene Chandler fan and lover of good music

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 19.

    Episode 6 ; Does it annoy you when the TV programmes use records from the wrong era? This is a lovely song by the Shirelles but wrong time it was 1960 not 1959 (It was only played in the US before that and we wouldn't have heard it yet...) get it right ..Call the Midwife ..don't you have people doing that job..I want that job ..give it to me..I know I am a geek it's a pity cos the clothes, hairstyles and furniture are all spot on..but we are not yet in the 1960s just yet....

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 20.

    Can you please tell me who was singing the song Wait for Me on Call the Midwife as I really liked it but could not find out who sang it?

 

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