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Broken teeth and shattered noses

Graham Gooch | 16:36 UK time, Friday, 23 May 2008

New Zealand batsman Daniel Flynn "wore one" on the grille just after lunch on the first day of the second Test.

A bouncer from England paceman James Anderson took the left-hander by surprise and he left the field minus one of his front teeth.

This is part of the batsmen's lot when you opt to play the hook shot - the one I remember most is back in the mid-eighties against the great West Indian side of that era.

Mike Gatting was facing up to the legendary Malcolm Marshall, he attempted to hook but was rather slow on the ball and the ball made direct contact with his nose.

flynninjury400.jpgSadly for Gatt, part of the bridge of his nose became embedded in the ball. Not a pretty sight. Obviously Gatt was in a bad way and the state of the pitch wasn't too good either with all the blood and gore on it.

Marshall enquired as to how he was and picked the ball up. He saw Gatt's nose in his cricket ball, decided he could not continue with the ball and threw it to the far side of Sabina Park.

On that note, Gatt left the ground. A few days later at a press conference, an English journalist asked him (looking like a giant panda) "where did it hit you Mike?"....

That's the one I remember most .. Over to you. Which ones do you remember?

Comments

  • Comment number 1.


    Shoaib Akhtar nailed Gary Kirsten a few years ago. Shoaib wasn't in his 'pies' era at that point and was fit and quick. Even despite the helmet, Kirsten was left with a badly dented face. The bouncer was apparently timed at 91.3 mph.

    Youtube has the footage here:

    Cricinfo offers this aftermath portrait shot of Kirsten:

    http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/india/content/image/246536.html

  • Comment number 2.

    Ooops! Youtube footage for the above:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUug4say8k0

  • Comment number 3.

    Brett Lee to Alex Tudor in the Perth Test in 2002. Depressingly encapsulated the whole series. Men against boys.

  • Comment number 4.

    "Brett Lee to Alex Tudor in the Perth Test in 2002. Depressingly encapsulated the whole series. Men against boys"

    How about...

    Steve Harmison to Ricky Ponting in the Lords Test in 2005. Enjoyably encapsulated the whole series. Men against boys.

  • Comment number 5.

    Back in the 80s, ODI, NZ vs Oz in Aussie, Lance Cairns(without helmet) comes to the crease with clear instructions to play solidly, no rash shots, just straight bat and defensive, because NZ was losing wickets left, right and centre. One of the first deliveries he got whacked him fair in the back of the head, and he hardly flinched! Just shook his head a bit, thought 'B*gger this for a game of soldiers!' and reverted back to the classic Cairns action of walloping sixes all over the shop! Legend. :o)

  • Comment number 6.

    hi,
    havent seen the footage, but was he wearing the chin strapUNDER the chin or using the palstic chinpiece?
    there is a difference imo, using the chinpiece brings the strap FORWARD therefore counterbalancing the impact of the ball and the grill sjhouldnt slam into the face. with the strap UNDER the jaw, the helmet is allowed to tilt BACKWARDS and ram into the face of hte batsman....
    mondy

  • Comment number 7.

    A few you might remember better than me Goochie.

    Michael Holding taking down Derek Randall on the 79-80 tour in oz. Cut his upper lip open.

    Bob Willis against a harmless Pakistan tail ender in 78. Pinged him on the side of the helmet and off he went.

    Bob again this time breaking Rick McCosker's jaw in the centenary test in 77. Some say 'Sideshow ' Bob wasn't express pace but he put loads of batsmen on their butts .

    Not forgetting Moseley cracking your fingers on that 1990 tour. Ouch !

  • Comment number 8.

    I seem to recollect Mark Ramprakash being injured when a ball hit the grille of his helmet and it became embedded in his chin . In Australia , I believe .

 

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