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Bielsa plots Brazil downfall

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Tim Vickery | 14:09 UK time, Sunday, 27 June 2010

Chile coach Marcelo Bielsa came to the World Cup with a point to prove. Eight years ago, in charge of his native Argentina, his side turned up in the Far East as favourites but crashed out in the first round and despite their impressive start in South Africa, there was a moment when it seemed that Chile, too, would not make the knockout stages.

When they went two goals down to Spain and had a man sent off, hopes of a place in the last 16 appeared to be slipping away but they pulled a goal back, and with Switzerland held by Honduras, Chile were safe.

You might have expected Bielsa to be ecstatic. But then you would have misjudged the man. "To celebrate qualification," he mused, "when it is superimposed with a defeat generates ambivalence." It was classic Bielsa . The language, the approach - it could only come from one of the most curious and refreshing coaches in the world game.

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I first had contact with Bielsa in the 1999 Copa America when, in the early stages of his spell with Argentina, his side had just been beaten 3-0 by Colombia. Watching his centre-forward Martin Palermo miss three penalties had proved too much for him. Bielsa had been sent off for yelling at the referee.

In the press conference Bielsa, in what I came to appreciate was his own eccentric style, sat staring transfixed at a spot in space. What had he thought of the refereeing? "I don't have the habit of commenting on referees," he said, "but on the subject of this one I would like to say..."

I waited for the standard diatribe of how his team had been robbed. But something very different came out. "I would like to say that in terms of my expulsion the referee was correct because I protested in an ill-mannered form." My jaw hit the floor. I was captivated.

During matches Bielsa's demeanour on the touchline betrays the fact that he is no ordinary coach. He squats to watch the action from ground level. Then he goes for a little walk in his technical area, muttering away to himself, head down with the air of a man who has dropped his keys. In fact he is deep in thought - and what he is usually thinking about is how to attack the opposition.

"In today's football caution is a virtue," he said after the Spain match, "and daring is not well thought of." But Bielsa is nothing if not daring. Iin an attacking line - up, he sees no point in the conventional full-back. He wants his width higher up the field. If the opponent plays with two strikers he will have three at the back, two to mark and one to cover. A defensive midfielder will provide protect and for the rest, they have the job of squeezing the opposition back in their half of the field.

This is the thinking behind his trademark 3-3-1-3 formation. At times he will go with a 4-2-1-3, but the principle stays the same. There is always a front three - two wingers and a central striker. Behind them is an attacking midfielder. And the two wide midfielders are expected to keep pushing forward - both at the same time, unlike the normal full back. They link up with the winger to create two against one situations against the opposing full-back.

It is high-tempo football. The team attack at pace, with quick exchanges of passes, lots of width, plenty of options for the man on the ball and presence in the penalty area and when a move breaks down the objective is to put the opponents under pressure and win the ball back in their half.

This recipe has worked even better with Chile than it did with Argentina. Bielsa had moments of success with the land of his birth - under him Argentina cruised impressively through qualification for the 2002 World Cup, were desperately unlucky not to win the 2004 Copa America and claimed gold at that year's Olympics.

sanchez595getty.jpgSanchez has admitted he wants a move away from Udinese this summer Photograph: Getty

But he was fighting an uphill battle. Under Bielsa there was no place in the team for an old style Argentine foot-on-the-ball playmaker like Juan Roman Riquelme. Once when Bielsa went to Boca Juniors' stadium the entire crowd were booing him and calling for Riquelme. Characteristically, Bielsa loved it. The crowd's response, he said, was "the essence of football."

With Chile, though, Bielsa did not have to push against an established tradition of play. Chilean football has no fixed identity. As the country's great defender Elias Figueroa once told me: " We've tried to imitate Argentina, we've tried to imitate Brazil, we've tried to imitate Germany and Spain."

It was fertile soil in which Bielsa could plant his own tradition. And he took over at an excellent moment, inheriting a hungry young group of players who had just come third in the 2007 World Youth Cup.

The pick of the bunch is right winger Alexis Sanchez. Up against the weaker flank of the Brazil defence, he offers the best hope of Chile pulling off a surprise .

In qualification Chile's bold approach and lack of height and strength played right into the hands of the big, strong counter-attacking machine that is Dunga's Brazil. Chile went down 3-0 at home and 4-2 away but Sanchez has come on since then, and Chile may have grown in confidence, perhaps surprising themselves with the way they bettered Spain for the first half hour.

Brazil, though, represent a different kind of challenge - one Chile will have to meet without Waldo Ponce, their best defender in the air, and Gary Medel, their best defender on the ground.

"While you're sleeping," Marcelo Bielsa once told one of his players, "I'm thinking of ways for the team to win." He might be entitled to some sleepless nights as he ponders how to beat Brazil.

Comments on the piece in the space provided. Questions on South American football to vickerycolumn@hotmail.com, and I'll pick out a couple for next week.

From last week's postbag :

Q) Watching Chile in the World Cup I have enjoyed their attacking football, but I am a bit concerned about where the goals are coming from. They seem to be looking to walk the ball into the net. Is this the way they played in qualifying and did they have the same difficulty in scoring goals then?
Peter Stone

A) This was not a problem in qualifying because of centre forward Humberto Suazo, who finished the campaign as the continent's top scorer. He was injured in the build up and has hardly featured so far - just the first half against Switzerland, when it was clear he was well short of 100%. A fully fit Suazo would give them more of a chance against Brazil - Sanchez to make the bullets and Suazo to fire them.

Q) Can you tell me about Uruguay's outstanding defender Diego Godin.
He was particularly outstanding in the opening game against France helping his captain Diego Lugano through an uncertain period in the match , he certainly looks the type to easily play for a top European club.
George Murray

A) I picked him out as one to watch in World Soccer magazine after the 2005 South American Under-20 Championships. It took me a couple of games to realise how good he was - he was so unflustered, doing the right things neatly and inconspicuously. And he's certainly living up to that potential. He's had problems with illness and injury in this World Cup, but while he's been on the field I haven't seen too many better centre backs. Came through with Nacional, one of the Montevideo giants, has been in Spain with Villareal for a few years now and at 24 has plenty of time to go higher still.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    I would never be so unpatriotic as to call any of the England footballers an idiot. But what I would like to know is which idiot called them footballers!!!!

  • Comment number 2.

    I am from Canada. We call football soccer...sorry.
    I don't see how England can go out time after time, standing around waiting for someone else to get inspired for the first 30+ minutes of the match - and expect to win.
    Yes, they were denied a goal, but they should have been down, 4 - 0 by that time anyway. This is soccer...move move move.
    Hopefully that ( Italian? ) coach will burn some asses in half time.

  • Comment number 3.

    Hey Tim!

    Great insight on Marcelo "el loco" Bielsa (I guess the "el loco" comes because of those unusual behaviors you described).I'm starting to feel really worried about tomorrow's match.Hope Chileans will act the same way they did in the qualifyings.
    How do you think the eventual absence of Felipe Melo will impact in the Brazilian midfield?

    Abraços.

  • Comment number 4.

    Great blog once again, loving watching Chile play however can't see them getting past Brazil. Discipline and putting the ball in the net are two important goals the Chile team aren't achieving in this world cup.

    Sánchez has looked very good, can see big money move for him in the summer but the player I've been most impressed with is Beausejour. He's quick, skillful and very strong (no diving or play acting), 26 yrs old where's he been hiding (well I know cos I checked wiki but still you know what I mean0. Looks a fine player.

  • Comment number 5.

    Chile's been one of the most exciting teams at the tournament, and the first half hour against Spain was as well-played a game as I've seen. Chile's skill on the ball and will to attack are great to see. But the referee has probably killed what little chance they had of making it a good game against Brazil with 7 yellow cards. Having to play without three players gives them very little chance against a team that handled them comfortably at full strength. You can only hope that Suazo is ready to go.

    I think Sanchez will be a big star. The player I'd like to have on my team is Medel, a really tough, effective (if foul prone) midfielder.

    Most coaches, given all this, would try to counterattack in this game, but Bielsa won't. Chile will come home on its shield, but it will be exciting for as long as it stays competitive. In any case, it's been a great success for Chile, from their first win against Argentina, to finishing second in SA qualifying to getting to the last 16 for the first time in half a century, and especially in being one of the great teams to watch in the tournament. Even a heavy loss to Brazil will take away very little from what they've accomplished.

  • Comment number 6.

    Nice blog Tim..but as we've just seen with Capello a team can only go so far in a tournament with a 'good' coach and the question is has Bielsa got the players to really worry Brazil? They showed quite a bit of naievity against the Spanish especially the keeper rushing out for Villa's first goal.

    At least you can say Chile have played each of their games with heart and not out of fear of getting booked and missing the next match. I just hope they have depth in their squad to cope? It would be fantastic for a nation such as theirs to go all the way.

  • Comment number 7.

    Wouldn't be too surprised to see another game as the one they played in Santiago with Brazil running out 3-0 winners.

    I would love a shock but I just don't see it. The only guy who can really hurt Brazil is Suazo and he is still not 100% fit.

    Tim, I wonder if Dunga will plug the hole on the left by dropping Bastos in favour of Gilberto. I have worries that Sanchez will have free reign for mayhem if Bastos plays at LB.

  • Comment number 8.

    The more I read about Bielsa, the more I like him. Chile's attack at all costs style is genuinely thrilling to watch. Without any disrespect to any of Chile's players (almost all of whom have been excellent), I would love to see what Bielsa could achieve with better players. His approach is such a breath of fresh air in contrast to the dour pragmatism of almost every other international manager/coach.

    Thanks for yet another exceptional blog, Tim.

  • Comment number 9.

    I wrote on one of these blogs the other week, stating that England should drop the 'Chelsea' players.
    England as a whole are a bunch of mercenaries. All their interested in, is being surrounded by WAGS and getting the occasional 'air brush' treatment in Magazines.
    I'll remind everybody who thinks that English football is the best in the World, that it's not and never will be. Continental players have always made the English players look better in the Premiership. It's the foreigners who are good, except for one or two English players. The whole thing gets completely hyped up every World cup. Until them Black sheep (Chelsea Players) get the push, younger more patriotic English players will never be able to put England where the cheap English people & tabloid newspapers propose they should be.
    Mercenaries................... the lot of em'

  • Comment number 10.

    #9 yes the chelsea players havent lived up to their normally high standards but thats because they had trash playing amongst them. the only player of decency outside of the chelsea players was rooney and he is obviously used to better service.

    If anything the liverpool players were the ones to make the team lopsided and fail to work as a team. they have zero positional ability, gerrard without a double pivot behind him covering his errors is a massive liability. if anything capello should have realised this, used gerrard as a striker and played a more conventional winger down the left, or completely dropped gerrard and aimed to play a more narrow formation utilising the fullbacks a bit more.

    chile is easily the best team to watch but from what i have seen they have a tendency to go to ground to make tackles, this at world cup level will always be a yellow card magnet. another problem is as stated the lack of goals, considering that sanchez and his counterpart on the left play nearly like wing strikers to an extent their lack of shooting compsoure really hurts the team. brazil wont be easy to beat, they strolled through qualifiers and their ability to break at pace and with high accuracy balls is amazing to watch.

    paraguay has also impressed, they seem to be very technical, nearly all the players have an amazing first touch and the forward barrios is amazing to watch as he seems to know where everyone of his players are.

    argentina is also impressive in group stages but with an easy group, i wanted to see more of pastore as he is an exciting player, not many tall skilful attackers with pace out there and after watching him you see a player very similar to kaka in my mind.

  • Comment number 11.

    Tim,

    Did anyone notice the ridiculous typo on Mexico stiker Adolfo Bautista's BBC profile?

    Have a look: http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/world_cup_2010/groups_and_teams/team/mexico/adolfo_bautista

    Every little helps...

    Adam

  • Comment number 12.

    The majority of us Chilean we are very proud of "la Roja'and Bielsa, we respect Brasil simply because they are the best, but whatever happens tomorrow we are already very proud of our boys I am sure they will do their best and this is what it counts. Come on Chile to live with honour or die with glory. Knowing our team they will fight till the last minute so be prepare Dunga we are not going to be easy. Fuerza Chile !!!

  • Comment number 13.

    Another week, another fine Vickery blog... It's almost getting boring! :)

  • Comment number 14.

    Hiya Tim.

    Just wondering if you could think of a reason for the desperately poor showing of Brazil's much vaunted set-piece skills?

    I am despairing at the never-ending corners that come to nothing...

    Looking forward to the game tomorrow though, hopefully a classic!

  • Comment number 15.

    I'm a Brit living in Chile and watched the England match with my Chilean friends who were egging England on all the way. Disappointed isn't the word I would describe the feeling after the match. They love the Premier League here and seeing England crash out in this way deflated the atmosphere. I was totally unimpressed. However, I will be supporting Chile on Monday, and yes, it will be a tough match for "La Roja", but I think they have the mindset to do it. Bielsa is well regarded over here, (withstanding Chilean and Argentinian rivalry) and the team have come a long way since the qualifiers. Where it'll hurt, is in the back. Without Medel and Ponce(I try not to laugh every time I see his name) things will be sticky. They say Suazo will be playing tomorrow, but whether or not he is fit enough is another thing. Despite Chile's error's against Spain, I thought they played brilliant attacking football and showed maturity. I for one will be on the edge of my seat all the way along with my Chilean friends who no matter what will be celebrating win or lose.

  • Comment number 16.

    I am a fan and ex player I MUST SAY THAT SATURDAYS GAME BETWEEN GERMANY AND ARGENTINA SHOULD BE THE MOST EXCITING GAME OF THIS CUP SO FAR. THAT BEING SAID I AM A HUGE FAN OF CHILE AND LOVE THEIR OFFENSIVE APPROACH. IN CLOSING LOOK OUT FOR MEXICO IN 2014!

  • Comment number 17.

    Chile will crash against Brazil playing Bielsa's strategy, but they will crush no matter what strategy they use. So, I rather loose playing good football than giving pity in the field.

  • Comment number 18.

    I like this Chile team, and like Bielsa much more than I care about Dunga, but I don't see any other result other than an easy Brazil win. Dunga's Brazil is kryptonite for very attacking teams that defend poorly.

  • Comment number 19.

    # 2: no need to apologize for the use of the word soccer because it's not a (North)Americanism as most people believe but rather a late 19th century British-coined term that stopped being used in the UK.

    # 17: I agree with you. Chile will lose, so they might as well play attacking football

  • Comment number 20.

    Great blog as per usual Tim.

    I really like this Chile side, they have showed the heart and determination which seems to be so badly missing from the England players, and even more so France.

    What I love more though is the amazing intensity they play the game at, absolutely fearless! Tactically Bielsa is unorthodox but very creative, I felt sorry for him in 2002 as the Argentinians were too tired to play the 3-1-3-3 formation he uses to with his high energy pressing game that has worked so well so far. As noted though, they do seem to lack any cutting edge up front and with Lucio and Juan being such imposing centre backs they may struggle.

    Is Melo available? If so he will surely relish a midfield battle. I have to say that this Brazil team doesn't inspire me. Fabiano has a wretched demeanor on the field, Melo is a thug, Alves is directionless and surely only benefits from playing in sides who attack with abandonment because he is so ill-disciplined positionally. I have enjoyed watching Elano though.

    Tim, given Chile's suspensions and doubts about a certain H.Suazo, how do you rate their chances? After seeing the way Brazil played against Portugal I wonder if that poor performance with a dash of complacency could make for a fire-cracker of a game played a frenetic pace, with a scare or two for Brazil, I just think that maybe having played three games where no one has really taken it to them they may be taken aback by Chile and Bielsa's approach?

    This World Cup I would like to see a lesser South American team play Holland in the Final.

  • Comment number 21.

    Bielsa! What a legend! A Chile against Argentina would be indeed very interesting - with the most expressive coaches on the benches (or walking sitting jumping - each with his own style!).

  • Comment number 22.

    Hi Tim

    Very interesting blog on Bielsa

    I think Chile will give Brasil a great game but will be undone on set pieces due there lack of height, Bielsa is a legend in his home city of Rosario, and Newell's have there stadium named after him.
    Im glad he is getting the recognition of the world regarding his style of coaching.
    Best of luck against Brasil, when playing Brasil at this stage you are playing against the referee as well, we all know FIFA want Brasil in the final and any tight decisions will go Brasil's way

  • Comment number 23.

    There would be some irony if a full on attacking team like Chile were to beat Brazil who's legendary status is bulit upon this style, but who now seem to be a bit more conservative.

  • Comment number 24.

    Hi Tim,
    Another great blog but I was just wondering if you were approached by any of the broadcasters prior to this world cup?
    It would be nice for the population to get some real insight into the South American teams rather than the generalisations that we are served up.
    I was particualry frustrated the other night when the co-commentator stated that he couldn't work out Chile's formation - something that he would have been able to comment on with a small amount of research.
    I'm looking forward to the game tonight but as you say I think Chile's style will suit Brazil but Bielsa might surprise us!

  • Comment number 25.

    Chile are a very entertaining attacking team. However, as it was evident in the game against Spain, they fail to cut it against the top teams. Chile will have no problems dealing with teams with strength but no skill, such as Switzerland, but will fail against teams with both skill and strength such as Spain, Germany or Brazil.

    Chile may have ended the qualifiers in second place just one point behind Brazil but that's a tad deceptive as they were thrashed by the Brazilians on both occasions (0-3 and 2-4), so there is a large gap between the two, especially considering that Chile's style plays straight into Brazil's strength, which is the counterattacking game.

    Brazil may not have impressed so far, but that's the way they play these days, since 1982 in fact. They just do what is needed to win and not even that if it's not strictly required, as it was the case in that dreadful game against Portugal.

    In any case, nobody expects Chile to beat Brazil so they might as well give it a good go in typical Bielsa style, he doesn't know any other way to play so at the very least it'll be a cracking game! Let's hope the refereeing is up to scratch.

  • Comment number 26.

    If Chile can do it we are all for the underdog. Sometimes one punches way above one's weight and it'll be a welcome sight.

  • Comment number 27.

    I have strong links to Brazil so I will be supporting the Selecao today however my username suggests what I think about the coach of Brazil and 1990s German style.

    A small part of me hopes Brazil fail today, just to make the case against defensive football. Italy were too defensive and are out (and should have been out to Australia last time round). However the way things are going in the last 15 years, I see no hope for enjoyable International football, it's all going down this defensive route with small teams looking to keep the big boys at bay and the big noys too worried about concending a single goal in games that matter.

    Bielsa & Chile are absolute stars of this tournament (and so was the Mexico team last night - no way should Argentina have won by 2 goals, I think Germany will have a much easier Qtr final game against them than the media think).

    Long live attack!

  • Comment number 28.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 29.


    Tim, this is a fascinating piece with precious insights into Coach Marcelo Biesla and his tested ways of proceeding. Chile has played well as a team but are yet to strike top form. Their showings against Honduras, Switzerland and Spain have been impressive and could be viewed as serious preparations for tackling the might of the traditional conquerors of the World Cup. Brazil has not played the football they are known for. Against North Korea and Ivory Coast they toiled a lot for those hard earned victories. Ronaldo's Portugal nearly shocked them with their identical play and sporadic Ronaldo led raids. Today anything can happen. May the team that plays positive and constructive football prevail. Wishing the players and the fans of the two sides a fine evening.


    Dr. Cajetan Coelho

  • Comment number 30.

    Tim - I´m living in Buenos Aires at the moment and despite knowing the country quite well can´t understand the national obsession with Martin Palermo. I´ve got into a load of arguments with people here following Argentina´s game with Greece about his merits as a player. The majority here think that he has been blessed with some sort of supernatural luck that means he is destined to score in every game he plays. Maradona seems to buy into this slightly too. They all seem blind to his technical deficiencies.

    Is there a player in Brazil that excerts a similar hold over the public as Palermo does in Argentina?

  • Comment number 31.

    I do not agree with the prediction that Brazil will win easily. If Alexis and Matias are inspired, ald el pelao Suazo can play to his level, we will see the ugly side of Brazilian football, just as in our 4-2 defeat in Brazil where Alexis was kicked mercilessly. With the fear that referees have of castigating the big ones, Brazil get away with a lot of rough playing.

    I am worried with the absence of Ponce and Medel. The first one played a so-so game against Spain but the little Medel is a giant in defence. I hope that Contreras will do the trick. Carmona is back and he is a very good midfield-defensive player.

    I insist, I am hopeful for Chile. Argentina and Germany look like much better footbal sides, collectively and individually. This Barzilian side I do not fear (well may be a bit!).

    Vaaaaaamos Chile!!!!

  • Comment number 32.

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  • Comment number 33.

    It's a shame Marco Estrada won't be playing tonight. The ex-Everton de Viña del Mar defender would have brought a degree of much needed steel to the Chile defense. Hopefully, the displays from La Roja will convince the Merseyside public that the Everton v Everton (Chile) pre-season friendly at Goodison Park on 4th August will be an event worth attending.

  • Comment number 34.

    Yes... the 2004 Olympics were special but they were overshadowed somewhat by the Argentinean Men's Basketball team (Beating the U.S. and capturing gold) --- no one gave Bielsa much credit for that win, which took them a while to finally break on through.

  • Comment number 35.

    Excellent post yet again! I've fallen in love with the way Chile play. Attacking and beautiful football throughout the team. They do need Suazo back to full fitness. They have got far too many single goal victories (and losses) to be taken seriously for the World Cup title.

  • Comment number 36.

    Sorry. For me some of you are over-hyping Chile.

    Sure they've done well. Played with every ounce of blood sweat and tears.

    But they just aint good enough.

    Hitting Row X with almost every shot is not going to win you anything.

    Brazil have shown the real class - and they have another gear if they need it.

    Argentina too. But I'm not so sure they have another gear.

    Still... I expect the dullish Netherlands to beat Brazil.

    It's that type of World Cup.

    Got 'European winner' stamped all over it!










  • Comment number 37.

    It looks like Brazilian class was in the end the downfall of the Chileans. No matter how much tactics you have futbol is as much an individual sports as a team sports ("South American stars are shining", you wrote in your previous blog). And Chile lacks that top class player in some key position; too bad Zamorano was not part of this generation.

    Speaking about crazy tacticians (or mad tacticians), what's your opinion of JR Carrasco? He's sort of the Uruguayan version of Bielsa, with his own flavour of locuras.

    and in an unrelated question. What about all these technology and video replays? I'm all against it... at least until the karma from the referees comes to bit Uruguay in the quarterfinals for the famous goal against Rusia in 1970... that one where the ball was out of bounds, or maybe not.

  • Comment number 38.

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  • Comment number 39.

    come on paraguay!!! one they start playing well they will be dangerous!

  • Comment number 40.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 41.

    @39 "come on paraguay!!! one they start playing well they will be dangerous!"

    lol, you forgot to mention: once they start scoring more goals than the other team, they'll win! ;)

    Anyway, hope they do, it'll be hard though, they struggled against Japan, we'll see what they're made of against Spain. I hope they at least give it a good go and not just sit back and wait for penalties. It would be great to have an all south american semis.

  • Comment number 42.

    @27 "Long live attack!"

    +1 , perhaps it's time for FIFA to do something to encourage attacking play.

    My 2c worth: Teams that score 4 or more goals get a bonus point, whether they win or lose. That would hopefully encourage teams to attack more and would make tournament standings more unpredictable.

  • Comment number 43.

    ot fully porno film conversant with Penarol's rich erotik film history in Uruguyan football but, a player I do remember seeing a fair bit of them mid nineties as a bleary indir eyed teenager watching full indir South American football in porno seyret the early hours and Pablo Bengoechea was a fantastic midfielder if I recall, yeşilçam porno I would have loved to see him in Europe. I just son bölümü izle wondered what role if any he has in ligtv izle footb

  • Comment number 44.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 45.

    hurm..england as a whole are a bunch of mercenaries. All their interested in, is being surrounded by WAGS and getting the occasional 'air brush' treatment in Magazines. I'll remind everybody who thinks that English football is the best in the World, that it's not and never will be. Continental players have always made the English players look better in the Premiership. It's the foreigners who are good, except for one or two English players. The whole thing gets completely hyped up every World cup. Until them Black sheep (Chelsea Players) get the push, younger more patriotic English players will never be able to put England where the cheap English people & tabloid newspapers propose they should be. maybe the should read Civil Engineering Society :)

  • Comment number 46.

    What I love more though is the amazing intensity they play the game at, absolutely fearless! Tactically Bielsa is unorthodox but very creative, I felt sorry for him in 2002 as the Argentinians were too tired to play the 3-1-3-3 formation he uses to with his high energy pressing game that has worked so well so far. As noted though, they do seem to lack any cutting edge up front and with Lucio and Juan being such imposing centre backs they may struggle.work onlinemake money from homepayday loansbest payday loans..

  • Comment number 47.

    Brazil weren't great but Spain looked awesome!

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  • Comment number 48.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 49.

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  • Comment number 50.

    perhaps it's time for FIFA to do something to encourage attacking play.

    My 2c worth: Teams that score 4 or more goals get a bonus point, whether they win or lose. That would hopefully encourage teams to attack more and would make tournament standings more unpredictable
    espn brazil

  • Comment number 51.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 52.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 53.

    Another excellent post yet again! I've fallen in love with the way Chile play. Attacking and beautiful football throughout the team. They do need Suazo back to full fitness. They have got far too many single goal victories (and losses) to be taken seriously for the World Cup title. World Most Amazing Records
    World Most Amazing Records

  • Comment number 54.

    Tim, this is a fascinating piece with precious insights into Coach Marcelo Biesla and his tested ways of proceeding. Chile has played well as a team but are yet to strike top form. Their showings against Honduras, Switzerland and Spain have been impressive and could be viewed as serious preparations for tackling the might of the traditional conquerors of the World Cup. Brazil has not played the football they are known for. Against North Korea and Ivory Coast they toiled a lot for those hard earned victories. Ronaldo's Portugal nearly shocked them with their identical play and sporadic Ronaldo led raids. Today anything can happen. May the team that plays positive and constructive football prevail. Wishing the players and the fans of the two sides a fine evening.

    Regards

  • Comment number 55.

    Brazil has not played the football they are known for. Against North Korea and Ivory Coast they toiled a lot for those hard earned victories. Ronaldo's Portugal nearly shocked them with their identical play and sporadic Ronaldo led raids. Today anything can happen. May the team that plays positive and constructive football prevail. Wishing the players and the fans of the two sides a fine evening.panerai watches - police watches - pulsar watches - sector watches - storm watches

  • Comment number 56.

    It was so inspiring to see Chile play. Love reading your posts.

    cheers
    Pradeep

 

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