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Suicide - support and advice

Friday 6 December 2013, 19:10

Keri Davies Keri Davies Web Producer, The Archers

Dan Hagley (Darrell Makepeace) Dan Hagley (Darrell Makepeace)

 If you've been affected by Darrell's storyline, here are sources of advice and support.
Samaritans is available for anyone struggling to cope round the clock, every single day of the year. They provide a safe place to talk where calls are completely confidential. Get in touch by phone or email or find the details for the local branch online
Phone: 08457 90 90 90
Email: jo@samaritans.org
www.samaritans.org
PAPYRUS and HOPELineUK
If you’re a young person and you’re considering suicide, or you feel depressed or like you’re not coping with life, HOPELineUK, provided by the organisation PAPYRUS, is a confidential helpline service staffed by trained professionals who can give support, practical advice and information. 
PAPYRUS can also offer help and advice if you’re concerned about someone you know.
Helpline: 0800 068 41 41
Email pat@papyrus-uk.org
Text 07786 209 697
www.papyrus-uk.org
CALM, the campaign against living miserably is a charity aimed at preventing male suicide in the UK. Calls to their helpline are anonymous, confidential, free from a landline and will not appear on itemised bills.
Helpline: 0800 58 58 58 (daily 5pm-midnight)
www.thecalmzone.net 
Lifeline is the crisis response counselling helpline for people suffering distress or despair in Northern Ireland. Whatever your age or circumstances if you or someone you know are suffering, Lifeline is there to help. 
For immediate support, call freephone 0808 808 8000 in confidence, 24 hours a day. 
www.lifelinehelpline.info 
ZEST is an organisation dealing with problems which lead to suicidal behaviour and self-harm. 
Phone: 028 71 266 999
www.zestni.org 
Breathing Space is a free, confidential phone and web based service for people in Scotland experiencing low mood, depression or anxiety. They are there in times of difficulty to provide a safe and supportive space by listening, offering advice and information.
If you think you need Breathing Space call 0800 83 85 87 (6pm til 2am Monday to Thursday and 24 hours at the weekend).  A BSL service is also available via the website.
www.breathingspacescotland.co.uk
Community Advice & Listening Line offers emotional support and information/literature on mental health and related matters to the people of Wales. Anyone concerned about their own mental health or that of a relative or friend can access the service. The C.A.L.L. Helpline offers a confidential listening and support service. 
Freephone: 0800 132 737, or text "help" to 81066.
http://callhelpline.org.uk/
Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide exists to meet the needs and break the isolation of those bereaved by the suicide of a close relative or friend.
Phone: 0844 561 6855 (daily 9am - 9pm)
www.uk-sobs.org.uk 
Shelter helps three million people a year struggling with bad housing or homelessness, via their website, helpline and face to face services and campaigns to prevent it in the first place.
They exist so that no-one has to fight bad housing or homelessness on their own.
Free Housing advice helpline: 0808 800 4444
www.shelter.org.uk 
Crisis is a national charity for single homeless people. They are dedicated to ending homelessness by delivering life-changing services and campaigning for change. Their innovative education, employment, housing and well-being services address individual needs and help people to transform their lives
Phone: 0300 636 1967 
www.crisis.org.uk 
The Citizens Advice Service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free, independent and confidential advice. To find details of your local bureau visit the website or text CAB and your post code to 64446.
Their self-help website has practical, reliable information to help you solve your problems.
www.adviceguide.org.uk  
Tailored advice for under 25s
www.citizensadvice.org.uk/advice4me.htm
Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales. It provides advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem. The charity campaigns to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding. The Mind infoline provides information on a range of topics including types of mental health problem, where to get help, medication and alternative treatments and advocacy. They are also able to provide details of local help and support. Contact them by phone on 0300 123 3393 between 9am and 6pm, Monday to Friday or by email at info@mind.org.uk 
www.mind.org.uk
Rethink Mental Illness is a charity that believes a better life is possible for millions of people affected by mental illness. They can provide practical advice and information about issues such as therapy and medication, benefits, debt, criminal justice and your rights under the Mental Health Act, as well as operating support groups across England. 
Rethink Information and Advice Line: 0300 5000 927 (Monday-Friday 10am-1pm) 
Email: advice@rethink.org 
www.rethink.org
SANE provides emotional support and information to anyone affected by mental illness. Their services are completely confidential and whatever your problems or concerns, you will receive non-judgemental emotional support. There are 3 main ways to reach them:
Helpline: 0845 767 8000  (available 6pm – 11pm every day)
Email: http://www.sane.org.uk/what_we_do/support/email/ 
Textcare: http://www.sane.org.uk/what_we_do/support/textcare/
Support Forum: http://www.sane.org.uk/what_we_do/support/supportforum/ 
Website: http://www.sane.org.uk
Penumbra is a Scottish mental health charity, working to improve mental wellbeing across Scotland. They work to promote mental health and wellbeing for all, prevent mental ill health for people who are ‘at risk’ and to support people with mental health problems. They provide a wide range of services for adults and young people which offer hope and practical steps towards recovery. 
Phone: 0131 475 2380 (9am-5pm Monday – Thursday; 9am-4pm Fridays)
Email: enquiries@penumbra.org.uk
www.penumbra.org.uk
Niamh Mental Wellbeing (Northern Ireland Association for Mental Health) provides local services to support the mental health and wellbeing of people across Northern Ireland. Through Beacon, they provide day, housing and advocacy support for anyone with experience of mental illness as well as support groups and learning programmes. Through Carecall they provide access to counselling and psychological therapies as well as mental health and wellbeing programmes, mainly in the workplace, colleges and higher education.  
Phone: 028 9032 8474
Email: info@niamhwellbeing.org 
www.niamhwellbeing.org

Samaritans
is available for anyone struggling to cope round the clock, every single day of the year. They provide a safe place to talk where calls are completely confidential. Get in touch by phone or email or find the details for the local branch online.
Phone: 08457 90 90 90
Email: jo@samaritans.org

PAPYRUS and HOPELineUK: If you’re a young person and you’re considering suicide, or you feel depressed or like you’re not coping with life, HOPELineUK, provided by the organisation PAPYRUS, is a confidential helpline service staffed by trained professionals who can give support, practical advice and information. PAPYRUS can also offer help and advice if you’re concerned about someone you know.
Helpline: 0800 068 41 41
Email pat@papyrus-uk.org
Text 07786 209 697

CALM, the campaign against living miserably is a charity aimed at preventing male suicide in the UK. Calls to their helpline are anonymous, confidential, free from a landline and will not appear on itemised bills.
Helpline: 0800 58 58 58 (daily 5pm-midnight)

Lifeline is the crisis response counselling helpline for people suffering distress or despair in Northern Ireland. Whatever your age or circumstances if you or someone you know are suffering, Lifeline is there to help. 
For immediate support, call freephone 0808 808 8000 in confidence, 24 hours a day. 

ZEST is an organisation dealing with problems which lead to suicidal behaviour and self-harm. 
Phone: 028 71 266 999

Breathing Space is a free, confidential phone and web based service for people in Scotland experiencing low mood, depression or anxiety. They are there in times of difficulty to provide a safe and supportive space by listening, offering advice and information.
If you think you need Breathing Space call 0800 83 85 87 (6pm til 2am Monday to Thursday and 24 hours at the weekend).  
A BSL service is also available via the website.

Community Advice & Listening Line offers emotional support and information/literature on mental health and related matters to the people of Wales. Anyone concerned about their own mental health or that of a relative or friend can access the service. The C.A.L.L. Helpline offers a confidential listening and support service. 
Freephone: 0800 132 737, or text "help" to 81066.

Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide exists to meet the needs and break the isolation of those bereaved by the suicide of a close relative or friend.
Phone: 0844 561 6855 (daily 9am - 9pm)

Shelter helps three million people a year struggling with bad housing or homelessness, via their website, helpline and face to face services and campaigns to prevent it in the first place.They exist so that no-one has to fight bad housing or homelessness on their own.
Free Housing advice helpline: 0808 800 4444

Crisis is a national charity for single homeless people. They are dedicated to ending homelessness by delivering life-changing services and campaigning for change. Their innovative education, employment, housing and well-being services address individual needs and help people to transform their lives
Phone: 0300 636 1967 

The Citizens Advice Service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free, independent and confidential advice.
To find details of your local bureau visit the website or text CAB and your post code to 64446.Their self-help website has practical, reliable information to help you solve your problems.
Tailored advice for under 25s

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales. It provides advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem. The charity campaigns to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding. The Mind infoline provides information on a range of topics including types of mental health problem, where to get help, medication and alternative treatments and advocacy. They are also able to provide details of local help and support.
Contact them by phone on 0300 123 3393 between 9am and 6pm, Monday to Friday
or by email at info@mind.org.uk 

Rethink Mental Illness is a charity that believes a better life is possible for millions of people affected by mental illness. They can provide practical advice and information about issues such as therapy and medication, benefits, debt, criminal justice and your rights under the Mental Health Act, as well as operating support groups across England. 
Rethink Information and Advice Line: 0300 5000 927 (Monday-Friday 10am-1pm) 
Email: advice@rethink.org 

SANE provides emotional support and information to anyone affected by mental illness. Their services are completely confidential and whatever your problems or concerns, you will receive non-judgemental emotional support. There are 3 main ways to reach them:
Helpline: 0845 767 8000  (available 6pm – 11pm every day)
Email  

Penumbra
is a Scottish mental health charity, working to improve mental wellbeing across Scotland. They work to promote mental health and wellbeing for all, prevent mental ill health for people who are ‘at risk’ and to support people with mental health problems. They provide a wide range of services for adults and young people which offer hope and practical steps towards recovery. 
Phone: 0131 475 2380 (9am-5pm Monday – Thursday; 9am-4pm Fridays)
Email: enquiries@penumbra.org.uk

Niamh Mental Wellbeing (Northern Ireland Association for Mental Health) provides local services to support the mental health and wellbeing of people across Northern Ireland. Through Beacon, they provide day, housing and advocacy support for anyone with experience of mental illness as well as support groups and learning programmes. Through Carecall they provide access to counselling and psychological therapies as well as mental health and wellbeing programmes, mainly in the workplace, colleges and higher education.  
Phone: 028 9032 8474
Email: info@niamhwellbeing.org 

Keri Davies is an Archers scriptwriter and web producer.
 
BBC Actionline - for sources on advice and support on many issues

Comments

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  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 1.

    I write as somebody who has been bereaved by suicide. I have been listening to the unfolding storyline just knowing that it was going to come to Darrell attempting to take his own life. Darrell has been so hard to help but there has been little official support. The list of organisations above that are there for the suicidal is absolutely fantastic, and if one doesn't work for you, keep trying, try another one. I think of myself as a member of an exclusive club that nobody wants to join and that I don't want anyone to have to join - but I know there always will be those who slip through the cracks and leave their loved ones devastated. This is where SOBS comes in. It saved me when the unthinkable happened with the death of my brother. If Darrell does die, I hope the storyline will mention SOBS. They say that 16 people are seriously affected by each suicide, and that's a whole lot of us human beings who have a massive burden to carry for the rest of our lives.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 2.

    Thank you for sharing this, Ladybirder.Very glad that you have managed to find support. We wish you all the very best.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 3.

    It is such a shame that it had to come to this before any real help was to hand, even though people such as the Vicar were involved. Darryl will surely not die - we had another suicide not that long ago - and it has been hinted elsewhere that the storyline will at a later stage demonstrate empathy rather than the sympathy proffered so far...

  • rate this
    -6

    Comment number 4.

    I have every admiration for the PC correct BBC again promoting information about a very serious matter and every sympathy for those affected.

    However The Archers is primarily a soap and for personal reasons, I use "Listen Again". Updating is very erratic, despite the last figure that I heard, a few years back for the site being 150 million pa.

    Who are you employing?

    My enjoyment of the episode 6/!2 was spoiled by knowing of the suicide, or attempted suicide before I started to listen, four hours after the live broadcast.

    Is the Archers primarily entertainment or a propaganda device? Radio 4 has more than adequate propaganda, most of which is well intentioned.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 5.

    Hi Mags - sorry that this was a spoiler for you but we wanted to make sure that the details about the above organisations were available to those who might need them.
    - Tayler

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 6.

    Thank you for putting this up. As a counsellor, I have been following this storyline with interest and although it makes for uncomfortable listening, I think it is a good way of widening understanding of mental illness and how Shula's lack of understanding about providing the appropriate support has been unhelpful in this case.
    The Archers has always covered difficult subjects (eg: rape, domestic abuse) and I hope will continue to reflect real life issues.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 7.

    Reported suicide rates are on the increase at the moment, a sign of the difficult times we are going through. And who knows how many are missed from the figures due to there being room for doubt as to whether the person truly meant to take their own life. In Darrell's case for example, should he die (which I pray he doesn't) if he was massively intoxicated, a coroner might have difficulty in reaching the conclusion that he was in sufficient control of his mind to mean to kill himself. In my earlier post, I should have said that for those left behind, as well as the SOBS national helpline, there is further support offered by SOBS to those left behind. There is a network of local groups which generally meet once a month run by and for "survivors". At the internet website of http://www.uk-sobs.org.uk/ a list of the 47 local groups is shown with details of how to get in touch with them. If you ring the national helpline, the person you speak to will also be able to signpost you to a local group. I facilitate one of the local groups and am finding it hard to spread the word locally. So it would be a huge help if the storyline could help SOBS a little bit - I hope it won't spoil anyone's enjoyment. All services are completely free and confidential by the way. I'm sorry if the subject spoiled your entertainment Mags but all we know (or at least me!) is that Darrell has taken an overdose of pills. I'm on tenterhooks to hear what the outcome is. I hope he survives and then that he receives the mental health care he so desperately needs. I fear that the NHS will not have the resources but there are some fantastic charities out there, paramount amongst them being MIND. In Darrell's case, there is also a homeless issue, and let's add SHELTER to the helplist, also CRISIS AT CHRISTMAS. They have lots of adverts out at the moment for ways you can book a place at their tables http://community.crisis.org.uk/reserve

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 8.

    Thanks for posting that useful information and links to SOBS and Crisis, Ladybirder.
    Tayler

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 9.

    As a social worker, I am all agog to know whether Darrell will have any psychiatric help..or whether, as is so often the case, he will be discharged from hospital after a psychiatric assessment with an out patient appointment after Christmas. Over to you, Shula!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 10.

    I too have found it quite hard to listen to this story as I lost my husband to suicide 19 years ago. Full marks for trying to handle such a storyline. I love the Archers as I was brought up listening to it, but other listeners have to realise that the countryside isn't all sunshine, fluffy sheep and dancing through the meadows. I agree with a previous post that if this story does end in the worse way, do mention SOBS who understand that bereavement in this manner is so different to any other way. My personal hope is that the character receives the help needed and recovers.

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 11.

    The only support I (am fortunate to) need is for my sides which I split laughing. The storyline is risible and Darrell is a vile stupid selfish bullying thieving sadistically minded criminal. It seems Karma is paying him back for his crimes and if I am supposed to feel even a modicum of sympathy for him then the SWs have failed.
    If the mother of his children -even his own mother- have disowned him why should I care.
    The opportunity to highlight depression and mental health issues in TA had been lost and Maketrouble's departure,in a box/bus or black Maria cannot come soon enough.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 12.

    Have been listening to this and have to say the acting is very good .Yes Darrell is difficult ( that is part of his illness ) The clutching at straws by him and Shula is all too real .. Yes there are services but sadly they do not always function ... The voluntary agencies are 1st class but the individual must approach them.. Darrell is humilated , confused and lacks any self esteem .Which of us knows when fate may deal us such a card ?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 13.

    Congratulations on very realistic portrayal of the agonies all round when someone is mentally ill. The scene with Shula 'nagging' Darrell showed the genuine frustration for the depressed person and those trying to support them, in this case the fact that depression can mimic (but definitely isn't!) laziness. I haven't heard this week's episodes and, assuming and hoping that Darrell survives the overdose, perhaps the local Crisis Team will finally make an appearance.

    Barwick Green's comments above reflect the profound lack of understanding, and empathy, that most of us grappling with mental illness and suicidality can face. Fortunately the portrayal of local people trying to help provides the other side - including the tenacity that is needed to get us past the nightmare of mental illness. And thanks for excellent list of organisations that provide support.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 14.

    But we DON'T know that Darrell is suffering from depression; when/where/by whom has it been mentioned on air?

    And yes, I have no sympathy for the whinging self-pitying sadistic thieving wretch that is that ridiculously named Mr Makepeace. Karma is paying him back for his crimes ( inclkuding the harassment of the Roseycheeks- remember?) and his departure from Ambridge cannot come soon enough.

    The SWs have lost the opportunity to write a stimulating interesting and factually correct story-line about mental health/depression. Using a blow-in like Darrel and give his criminal antecedents was a mistake; there were far better candidates (e.g. Ed, Jill or Kathy. The latter's being bullied at work just faded away after two visits from the job fairy and there's little doubt that Darrell's fate will be glossed over and very soon forgotten ala SATTC.)

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 15.

    I think it's pretty clear that Darrell is depressed. First his behaviour is symptomatic of depression and then to realise what a knockout blow it was for him when the appalling greedy Elona left him and Rosa rejected him, it's no wonder he was desperate.

    If Karma had anything to do with Darrell's plight then I'd be expecting Matt, the crook who blackmailed Darrell into acting for him, and drove that Arthur bloke to his death, would be under a freezing hedge somewhere in Russia. But he's not, he's living the life of Riley with Lil in their £1.25m+ house and so I think we can safely rule out Karma.

    Darrell is a weak and quite pathetic man who's influenced by the last person who harangued him but he is someone who can be decent and caring when he's not being pushed around by criminals to act for them or a greedy wife who's always so worried. Give him the environment in which to work and live lawfully and peacefully and he'd be absolutely fine. I wonder how far any of us would have got if we'd been in his boat.

    As to blow ins well yes, in my view any new character since 1975 could be described as a blow in but I'd say it would be rather lazy to label more recently introduced characters as blow ins just because we don't like them. If we're going to get rid of crooked and/or dishonest blow ins then Brian Aldridge and Matt Crawford are top of my list. However I think that a variety of characters is what makes the Archers so I'm not advocating their removal.

    I think this Darrell storyline has been done really well - can't say I've enjoyed it but I have been glued to it.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 16.

    Somewhat puzzled to read the description of Darrell's wife in above post! I thought she was a hard working woman in a caring job who stood by Darrell while he was in prison. She did, eventually, leave him, but only after he'd jeopardized her family's safety (in her view) by getting involved with the dog-fighting gang. I don't think it was appallingly greedy of her to want Darrell to share her role as bread-winner and provide their daughters with a reasonable standard of living. Had she been 'appallingly greedy', she'd have been demanding loads of high-tech entertainment systems and expensive holidays.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 17.

    I'm not sure that a brand new scooter and piano lessons are a 'reasonable standard of living' for people who are struggling to make ends meet. Although Elona did seem to con Darrell into that idea, poor sap. It was Elona's demands for more and more money that tipped Darrell back into criminal activities, notably stealing the key from Home Farm. if she'd listened to him a bit more or even left him when he couldn't provide all these essential non essentials then Darrell would have been a lot better off.

    One of the things I enjoyed the other day was hearing the ghastly selfish Rosa zooming off on her scooter. I hope one day she finds out just how much that scooter cost.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 18.

    thanks cath , I was beginning to think I'd been tuned in to another series but now I realize I hadn't ...Elona wanted a new washer these things for the girls She also belittled his efforts to get work Only the other week the rather selfish Rosa was saying how she would prefer a car to the scooter ....It's my belief that Darrells background and accent are what annoy certain listeners .It's noticeable how little is said about Jill Archer's extremely unchristian attitude ... and her the pillar of the church ..She who has so much support re her eyes , which she fobs off as fussing ..Lucky her !!!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 19.

    I'm with Barwick Green and anyone else who feels that Darrell was entirely the wrong character for the scriptwriters to choose if they wished to elicit sympathy concerning this issue. I don't mind his accent, but his background certainly was a problem i.e that of a semi-criminal. I was amazed to hear Jennifer describe him as a 'lovely chap'--didn't she know he'd stolen Brian's keys to help the dog-fighting gang gain access? As for Jill's attitude---well, surely she was right? Wasn't part of the point of the story-line to suggest that Shula had adopted the wrong approach, that she unwittingly enabled Darrell to get worse by making him dependent instead of seeking professional help? It seems that now he's broken free from Shula, he's got more of a chance of standing on his own feet.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 20.

    The whole point is that by and large there is very little sympathy for those like Darrell Sympathy is not always constructive ,,,, However we simply cannot write human beings off .He has served time but then so have some noteable authors !! Darrell is weak , he was threatened by Matt ( semi criminal or criminal character if ever ) Lets not forget Matt engineered Pauls killing .After this Darrell was threatened by the thug who , if my memory serves me right said they would get at his family ...if he didnt cooperate .. Sure he could have gone to the police but maybe they would have taken the line you and Barwick Green take .." label criminal ", therefore dont help .The story line may be offensive to some as it highlights the holes in the network of social services ....I still maintain Jill has shown herself to be a none Christian .Great no doubt with those she knows at church but not so keen to deal with black sheep .We shall just have to wait and see ..Meanwhile let's say when we come across a Darrell ,
    'there but for the grace of God go I ' .None of us know what cards are to be dealt tomrrow ........

 

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