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Wednesday 5th of May BBC2, 1.00pm

SH Line Producer | 13:48 UK time, Wednesday, 5 May 2010

We roll back the years on today's 'See Hear' when Memnos visits an exhibition at YorkCastleMuseum, which celebrates the 50th anniversary of the start of the Swinging Sixties...

 

Looking at some fantastic archive footage and lovely reminiscences from deaf people who grew up in the 1960's we find out what life was like during one of the most explosive decades in recent times.

Everything from technology, transport, social history, housing, fashion and music changed at an incredible pace.

And then of course there was the 1966 World Cup and the Moon Landing as further defining moments.

 

In Britain free will and freedom of expression were high on the agenda - oral contraception became available on the NHS and Ban the Bomb supporters rallied in London.

 

On the music scene 'Beatlemania' began in 1963 with the hit record 'Please, Please Me'. This made the Beatles one of the defining icons of the era.

 

Other major influence on the British fashion scene alongside the Beatles was designer, Mary Quant, one of the many designers who took credit for inventing the miniskirt and hot pants.

 

Deaf people all over the country joined in the fashion craze, sporting bright colored clothes, Beatle haircuts and shocking pink lipstick.

Fashion soon became a means of meeting hearing people on equal terms.

 

Attitudes towards Deaf people were developing in other areas of society too.

On television the BBC decided to improve its monthly programme 'For Deaf Children' and called it 'Vision On', aimed to appeal to both deaf, hard of hearing and hearing children.

 

To find out more about the Swinging Sixties exhibition, follow this link

www.yorkcastlemuseum.org.uk

or visit  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1960s for more general information about this exciting decade.

 

And we catch up with William Roache,

Coronation Street
's 'Ken Barlow', whose soap career began in 1960 when he made his first appearance on the most famous street on television...

He talked to us about losing his hearing as a young soldier and the effect it's had on his life.

Because of a mortar bomb explosion that he witnessed while on National Service with the British Army William lost 50% of his hearing in both ears and also suffers from tinnitus.

 

After leaving the army aged 26 William decided to fulfill his ambition of becoming an actor.

He learned his craft at various theatres before accepting the role as Ken Barlow in

Coronation Street
in 1960.

William is the only remaining member of the original cast. He is currently the longest-serving actor in

Coronation Street
and in British soap overall,  as well as the second-longest continuous actor in the worldwide history of television serials.

 

William is fronting the 2010 Sound Barrier Star Awards and is encouraging people to get free ­hearing tests at Specsavers and to enter the Sound Barrier Star Awards to find the nation's heroes who are hard of hearing or deaf.

 

The awards are an opportunity to nominate a special person who has achieved inspiring feats despite the challenges that come with impaired hearing.

Closing date for nominations is Friday 18th June.  

The winner will be announced at a National Awards ceremony on Wed 22nd September.

 

For more information please follow this link http://www.hearingdogs.org.uk/media_sound_barrier_star_awards.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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