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Royal wanderings around the Scottish countryside.

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Denise Glass | 13:00 UK time, Thursday, 28 April 2011

Euan McIlwraith crosses the Forth from South Queensferry to North Queensferry.

Euan McIlwraith crosses the Forth from South Queensferry to North Queensferry.

Imagine the disappointment in finding out that your feet are just too big for you to have ever been crowned an ancient monarch.

That's what Out of Doors senior producer Helen Needham discovered while the team were out and about recording interviews for our royal special on Saturday.

You may ask what the connection between an outdoor programme and the royals are - but they've left quite a mark - whether that's in how an area looks, their love of the Scottish countryside or in the myths and legends surrounding them.

So armed with history books, a Shakespeare play and a microphone we set out across Scotland exploring those royal connections.

Mark Stephen climbed up Dunsinane Hill - where Macbeth was killed in the Shakespeare play - although not in real life.

Euan McIlwraith toured the places close to Queen Victoria's heart at Balmoral.

And Helen Needham - and her size eights - walked to the footprint in the rock where our ancient kings were crowned.

We also visited Melrose Abbey, where Robert the Bruce's heart is buried, took a boat across the Forth between the Queensferries and headed out to Loch Leven Castle, where Mary, Queen of Scots was imprisoned.

Euan McIlwraith crosses the Forth from South Queensferry to North Queensferry.

Euan McIlwraith crosses the Forth from South Queensferry to North Queensferry.

Our other special programme going out on Saturday is about the history of salmon fishing on the River Clyde - but even that has a royal connection. Did you know that the fish on the crest of Glasgow is a salmon - and that it's actually based on a story of a queen's adultery?


All will be revealed on Out of Doors this weekend.

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