Archives for February 2011

Libya, William, Kate and the Oscars

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 11:30 UK time, Monday, 28 February 2011

Much discussion of Libya in this week's programme and the government's handling of the airlift of Brits stranded there. In the studio with me were The Guardian's Severin Carrell, Lyndsey Moss of The Scotsman, and media lecturer and former SNP adviser Ewan Crawford. All were agreed that it wasn't the government's final hour. The Sunday papers were full of headlines of the airlifts which had finally taken place the day before. All spoke of "daring" or "dramatic" rescues by the SAS. But as Ewan pointed out, on closer reading there were no balaclavas and abseiling soldiers plucking people out of danger. The planes landed. People got on. The planes took off. Doesn't make for such a good headline though.

Sunday was the eightieth birthday of former Soviet President Mikhael Gorbachev. A good time to speak to my special guest, journalist David Hoffman. David's written a Pulitzer Prize winning book about the end of the Cold War and it has some fascinating behind the scenes insights into the talks that went on between Reagan and Gorbachev including a chilling account of what "The Dead Hand" of the title means (think Dr Strangelove) and why Gorbachev had a statue of a goose in his office!

Other topics on the programme included the coverage of William and Kate's visit to St Andrews. I think you can guess that a bunch of cynical journalists considered it too much. And, staying with a Royal theme, we debated the chances of The King's Speech at the Oscars. By the time you read this we will know the results but since I'm writing this on Sunday night I'm going to stick my neck out and make my own predictions:
Best Actor, Colin Firth,
Best Actress, Natalie Portman,
Best Picture, The Social Network.
If I'm right, move over Mark Kermode, if I'm wrong, well, the Academy were wrong.

Islands in the Stream?

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 08:13 UK time, Sunday, 27 February 2011

It was while I was researching information on the "Mingulay Boat Song" popularised by The Corries amongst others, that I got to thinking about the number of songs that were written in praise of islands. Needless to say there are a number of Gaelic songs which extol the virtues of the great majority of them, from Lewis to Barra, and all between there and the mainland - many written by exiles or sailors, with a deep longing for their homeland.

But there are some which have been translated into English - Dark Island for example, there's the world famous "Skye Boat Song" and if you want to be less specific, well what about "Islands in the Stream" - Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton? Madonna recorded La Isla Bonita and Elton John sang about Island Girl and a band called Typically Tropical took "Barbados" to Number 1 in July 1975. That's just a few of them. What about classical tracks - were any of our world-famous composers sufficiently moved to write about a particular part of the world, an island somewhere? Which are your own favourites - let me know.

The Greetings Programme is in BBC Radio Scotland every Sunday, 0705-0800

Newsweek Scotland - A Week in News; Libya

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 15:29 UK time, Friday, 25 February 2011

What was the Government (UK) up to this week? It looked like Carry On Governing as our Libya rescue plane got stuck on the tarmac, our naval vessel sat off the coast awaiting permission to dock from a non-existant port authority, the Foreign Secretary thought Colonel Gaddafi was flying to Venezuela while he was actually on television in Tripoli, the Prime Minister was on tour in the area, thoughtfully with a team of arms dealers and Nick Clegg was skiing in Switzerland instead of standing in for him. The air of chaos was heightened by the knowledge that our frigate HMS Cumberland is only weeks away from being scrapped in the defence review and that other countries just got the finger - and their people - out without much ado.

We're only human but you and I don't have a back-up of thousands of civil servants to help out with our arrangments. I mean, I took two hours to build a kiddie's kitchen from IKEA this week and stabbed myself in the finger with a screwdriver. But then I'm not trying to run the country. (Not until both girls are at school). How could Nick Clegg forget he was deputy Prime Minister and was expected to....what's the word? Oh yes...deputise when Cameron is away? You imagine Miriam at the airport saying to him: "Have we forgotten anything, darling"? "Oh S+++! I'm supposed to govern the country".

Sorry about all this but I've been reading the Daily Mail. The Mail is a touchstone for Middle England and is heaping scorn on the Coalition over this and the approach taken to bankers bonuses so I think the Downing Street PR alchemists should beware. Anyway it's worth remembering the shambles and David Cameron's profuse apology the next time one of the London commentariat sneer at some Holyrood debacle. I reckon governments are forged in the heat of the challenge - and in the shadow of mistakes made - not on the iPad screens of special advisers, so this week may be salutary.

We kick off this week's programme from an interesting location - Lebanon. What was for many years the most volatile country in the region is so far unaffected by the democracy contagion we are calling the Arab Spring. It is remarkably stable if not politically stagnating as we hear from Nadim Shehadi of Chatham House from our Beirut studio. He traces the latest risings back to the symbolic act of Saddam's statue being toppled in 2003. It's insightful analysis which we continue with two veteran experts, Professor David Anderson of Oxford University and Trevor Royle of the Sunday Herald
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We're in Ireland where they stop after voting and go to the pub before they begin the count in the general election. So long as our interviewee Patrick Freyne doesn't go for a beer. Come to think of it, the last time we met him was, yes, in a bar in Dublin. Huw Williams regales us with his tales from Cork, Galway and Limerick and we have a disturbing story about poverty at home. Angus Macleod will guide us serenely through the Saturday morning papers and it will all go as smoothly as a Government rescue mission to Libya. Join us at 8 on Saturday.

Take The Floor events guide w/c 25 Feb. 2011

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Alan Braidwood Alan Braidwood | 10:21 UK time, Friday, 25 February 2011

FRIDAY 25th FEBRUARY
Edinburgh - Lauriston Hall - Scott Leslie Ceilidh Band with caller Ken Gourlay - 8pm - *Tickets £10/£8/£6*

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Helensburgh - Commodore Inn - Stuart McKeown - 8pm-12:30am - *Tickets £8*

Peebles - Ex-Servicemens Club - Johnny Duncan - 8pm-11:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Edinburgh - Grangemouth Town Hall - The David Oswald Band & Campbell Hunter - 7:30pm-midnight - *Tickets £11*

Scottish Country Dances
North Kessock - Hall - Frank Thomson - 8pm

SATURDAY 26th FEBRUARY
Classes
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Fiddle with Karen Hannah - improvers' class - 11am

Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Whistle with Helen Forbes - 12:30pm

Concert
Glasgow - Whitecraigs Tennis Club - Hot Jazz with Alastair McDonald - 7:30pm

Glasgow - Sounds In The Suburbs - Newfangled Folk Spring Tour with Kim Edgar, David Ferrard and Yvonne Lyon

The Accoustic Affair - Glasgow - City Halls - Recital Room - Rose Room - Paul McLinden - 8pm - *Tickets £10*

Fiddlers Rally
Inverness - Fiddlers Rally - Eden Court Theatre

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Tranent - Tranmare Hotel - Dod Hutchison - 8pm-11pm - *Tickets £2.50*

Largo Ward - Village Hall - Scott Band - 8pm-11pm - *Tickets £5*

Pumpherston - Village Hall - Gordon Pattullo - 7:30-11:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Scottish Country Dances
Edinburgh - Trinity SCD Club - Club Night - Edinburgh Academy Jnr School - Ian Muir - 7:30pm-10:30pm - *Tickets £8/£6*

Kirkliston Scottish Country Dance Club - Kirkliston - Scottish Night Dance

Clydebank and District Highland Association - Old Kilpartrick - Napier Hall - The Monach Isles Ceilidh Band - 5-11pm

SUNDAY 27th FEBRUARY
Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Old-Time Ceilidh Dances
Windygates Institute - Bruce Lindsay Band - 7-10:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Fife - Old Parish Church Hall - Kirk Wynd - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 2-5pm - *Tickets £3*

East Kilbride - Girl Guide Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £2*

Concert
Perth - Perth Theatre & Concert Hall - Perth SRS Concert

Inverness - Eden Court - Newfangled Folk Spring Tour with Kim Edgar, David Ferrard and Yvonne Lyon

MONDAY 28th FEBRUARY
Class
St Andrews, SCD Club - live music from Dierdre Adamson on Accordion (learners welcome) - 7:30pm

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Pitlochry, Recreational Grounds (Town Hall if wet) - Highland Nights

Dumbarton - St Patrick's Hall - Strathleven Place - Ceilidh & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm

TUESDAY 1st MARCH
Class
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Scots Song - suitable for beginners - 2pm

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Westerton Summer Dancing - Bearsden, Westerton Village Hall, Maxwell Avenue, Westerton - Musicians John Renton and Rickie Francie - 7:30-10:30pm

Humbie - Village Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time Club & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Leith Folk Club - Fiona Rutherford and Amy Duncan - *Tickets £6*

WEDNESDAY 2nd MARCH
Class
Fife - Kenoway Community School - Accordion Class - George Lawrie - 7-9pm - *Tickets £5.60/half price first lesson*

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Carnoustie Scottish Country Dance Club - Carnoustie, Beach Hall, Links Parade - Various Bands - 8-11pm

Newtongrange - Dean Tavern - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Concert
Glasgow - St Andrews In The Square - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Midlem - Village Hall - Live Music - Old Time Class (GB Scott) - 8-10pm - *Tickets £2*

THURSDAY 3rd MARCH
Class
Penicuick - Town Hall - Ceilidh Class - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £2.90/£1.50*

Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
RSCDS - Alva, Summer Dance, Cochrane Hall, West Stirling Street - various musicians - 7:30-10:30pm

Concert
Glasgow - St Andrew's In The Square - Jim Malcolm - 8pm - *Tickets £8/£6*

27th FEBRUARY - 4th MARCH - WINTER SCHOOL
The Royal Scottish Country Dance Society are holding Course 2 of the Winter School in Pitlochry


Take The Floor is on BBC Radio Scotland every Saturday, from 1905

Radio Scotland Remixed: Day Five

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 00:02 UK time, Friday, 25 February 2011

Vic Galloway

Well it's been an eventful week but tonight sees the Radio Scotland Remixed series come to an end. For the final show in the series, Vic Galloway takes over the driving seat from Ricky Ross's usual Friday night Another Country with Ricky Ross slot.

The show's music policy covers the best in Americana and alternative country and Vic will be bringing a rock 'n' roll edge to the playlist.

We spoke to Vic to find out more and you can listen live tonight from 8PM.

What can listeners expect from tonight's show?

A more rock'n'roll take on alt-country, I'd say. The boundaries of what people assume to be 'country music' may be pushed a little, taking in gospel, blues, rockabilly, indie, punk and singer-songwriters across different generations.


I won't be concentrating hugely on modern artists, as I do on my weekly Radio Scotland show, but more on heritage artists that I hope fit the bill. It will certainly be a show with a difference and hopefully a lot of fun!

Who would be your ideal guest artist/band and why?

This is an almost impossible question to answer for a someone like myself. I love music across all genres and styles, and so many millions of different artists. To choose one... ouch! OK then, it may sound a little obvious here, but I'm going to go for The Beatles... sorry.


I love their output so much and it's hard to top them. They wrote the rulebook on how to pen pop songs, starting with punchy 2 minute rock'n'roll numbers to bombastic, orchestrated concept pieces and everything in between.

Every part of every song on every album is catchy and has a specific point - there's no fat or excess. They had incredible ideas and their set of albums still stands head and shoulders above anyone else to this day. Quite some feat in over 50 years of rock'n'roll! However, it would be somewhat of a coup to have them as guests on a show in 2011.

In the style of Desert Island Discs, imagine you're stuck on a desert island and have a radio, but it can only tune into one show...what show would you listen to and why?

Simple... The John Peel Show! From any era that he was broadcasting, but possibly particularly the late 70's and early 80's when he was totally in a field of his own when it came to championing new, challenging and outlandish, modern music across every genre known to man.


If I were stuck on a desert island, I would never be bored by the Peel show, as I would never know what to expect next. He was the greatest music-radio broadcaster of all time. A true selector!

For a taster of Vic's usual playlist, here's a clip from The Phantom Band's recent session:


Tom's Top Tales

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 15:12 UK time, Thursday, 24 February 2011

The story this week of a Brazilian family which found an alligator behind the sofa (after a flood receded) prompted some recollections from Tom Morton Show listeners about stuff found down the back of sofas and setees. But I didn't expect this, from Andy in Ayr...

As a youth I was employed by the local Co-op as a van driver on Saturdays. The task, along with the van boy, was to deliver a suite to a house and remove the old one. Simple! Old one out, half way down garden path when... it starts to leak 'water'. It was a commode! New suite was delivered but the old one was left to keep it company.

The Tom Morton Show is on BBC Radio Scotland, weekdays from 1405

Radio Scotland Remixed: Day Four

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 00:02 UK time, Thursday, 24 February 2011

Mary Ann Kennedy

We're now onto day four of the Radio Scotland Remixed series and over the past three days we've heard Ricky Ross bring the worlds of Americana and indie rock together, Stephen Duffy explore world music from a jazz perspective and Bruce MacGregor investigating the folk influences in jazz.

Tonight's show puts Mary Ann Kennedy in the hot seat and sees her take over Bruce MacGregor's Thursday night Travelling Folk slot.

We spoke to Mary Ann to find out more and you can listen live from 8PM tonight:

What can listeners expect from tonight's show?

We'll be looking at the roots of the music that we play week in/week out on Global Gathering - from Scotland as well as abroad.

Who would be your ideal guest artist/band and why?

Dónal Lunny - he brings the six degrees of seperation down to one, the man has worked with everyone! Also, he's from Donegal so we share a gaelic background.

In the style of Desert Island Discs, imagine you're stuck on a desert island and have a radio, but it can only tune into one show...what show would you listen to and why?

Laura Cantrell's Radio Thrift Shop. Laura has fantastic taste in music and is constantly introducing me to new artists and music.

Mary Ann Kennedy's Global Gathering is a world music show with a uniquely Scottish perspective, watch a clip of Saltfishforty's session for the programme below to give you an idea of what to expect this evening.


Radio Scotland Remixed: Day Three

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 00:02 UK time, Wednesday, 23 February 2011

Bruce MacGregor

We continue our week long Radio Scotland Remixed series and day three has arrived. The next show to receive the rework treatment is The Jazz House. Regular presenter Stephen Duffy hands over the controls to Bruce MacGregor for one night only and we spoke to Bruce to find out more.

Listen live at 8PM tonight.

What can listeners expect from tonight's show?

Anything and everything, there's such amazing scope here. We'll be going right back to Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys and the influences that jazz hillbilly music had on our own Aly Bain and Peerie Willie Johnstone to bands like Lau who are blurring all the edges of musical boundaries
Who would be your ideal guest artist/band and why?


Silly Wizard - one of the greatest ever scottish bands with some of the finest raconteurs in the business. Also I'd definitely have to have James Scott Skinner - the self styled "Strathspey King". I think I'd get him to guest with the band and maybe do a duet with Phil Cunningham.

Probably get Moishe's Bagel in too along with Saltfishforty - guys who play with a smile on their faces! Also, I think I'd like to have Robert Burns in - he was a keen fiddler so he'd be good craic round the table.

I'd also probably have Alison Krauss and Robert Plant in for some soothing tunes and songs - I'd also like to find out if it really was THAT wild in Led Zeppelin - someone once said Blazin' Fiddles were the Led Zeppelin of the folk world (actually I think it was Tom Morton!) and we were never sure if that had something to do with the music or our propensity for a party........how big is this party allowed to be?

Can I get Ritchie Blackmore - I am amazed that a rock legend could suddenly develop an interest in 16th century english lute music...interesting! Oh and Bon Scott from AC/DC fame - a sadly departed Scotsman who played bagpipes on a few early albums.

I'd probably have to ask Hank Williams to pop in too - amazing songwriter , keen fiddler himself and a man who liked a dram too. If Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson were passing I'd like to drag them in too just round the piano which would be played by Andy Thorburn and I think I'd just get Garrison Kiellor to host the whole programme.

In the style of Desert Island Discs, imagine you're stuck on a desert island and have a radio, but it can only tune into one show...what show would you listen to and why?

I think i'd like to listen to that programme Ive just described above if not then probably Off the Ball.

Bruce recently played host to two Celtic Connections specials on Travelling Folk, here's a brilliant performance from Malinky performing live in the foyer at Pacific Quay from the first of those shows.

The Scots; A Genetic Journey, episode 2

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Alan Braidwood Alan Braidwood | 11:35 UK time, Tuesday, 22 February 2011

Here are some words from Alistair Moffat about the recording of the second episode of The Scots; A Genetic Journey. The photographs are also from the recording at Cairnpapple Hill.

Alistair Moffat - To Cairnpapple on Thursday 21st October.
Very windy, very sunny and the hill very high. It's the site of a prehistoric temple built in stages from 3500BC by peoples who had become farmers around the Linlithgow area. They were producing enough surplus food to be able to devote time to building a wooden henge and a series of very elaborate and impressive burials. One of them had pottery with the remains of strong drink in one bowl and there were traces of flowers in the graves - the start of long traditions at funerals. The producer Amanda Hargreaves had organised access and Jim Wilson, my scientific collaborator and I marched to the top of the very windy hill and talked about it with Adrian Cox from Historic Scotland. Good stuff.

Photographs taken during the recording of episode 2, Cairnpapple HIll, October 2010

Photographs taken during the recording of episode 2, Cairnpapple HIll, October 2010

The Scots; A Genetic Journey is broadcast on BBC Radio Scotland, Wednesdays, 1530-1600

Radio Scotland Remixed: Day Two

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 07:53 UK time, Tuesday, 22 February 2011

Stephen Duffy

Hopefully you caught the first outing into the world of Radio Scotland Remixed last night. If not, you can listen again and catch Ricky Ross bringing a touch of Americana to Vic Galloway's Monday night slot.

Day two sees Jazz House presenter Stephen Duffy take over Mary Ann Kennedy's Global Gathering and explore world music from a jazz angle.

We spoke to Stephen to find out more and you can listen live tonight at 8PM:

What can listeners expect from tonight's show?

I'm looking forward to hearing some of Scotland's top jazz talent take on some traditional tunes from right across the world, but also can't wait to see what kind of reaction we get from the world music audience to Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Kenton. As the line between what is jazz and what isn't is getting thinner and thinner, I think they're going to love it!

Who would be your ideal guest artist/band and why?

My perfect studio guests; without question that would have to be singer Ella Fitzgerald with pianist Oscar Peterson and the entire Count Basie Orchestra. The greatest band in the history of jazz with the greatest singer and the greatest pianist. Nuff said!
In the style of Desert Island Discs, imagine you're stuck on a desert island and have a radio, but it can only tune into one show...what show would you listen to and why?


"Round the Horne", the madcap and saucy BBC comedy from the 1960's starring Kenneth Williams and Kenneth Horne. How they got with away such near the knuckle humour, that's still really risqué even now. I'll never know! I never fail to howl with laughter at the sheer genius of it all. And like all good shows of the time, they had a big, swingin in-house band too. It was surreal and naughty and charming all at the same time. Brilliant!

Here's a clip of Martin Taylor, filmed live on The Jazz House on Radio Scotland to give you a glimpse into Stephen's world:


Shereen's Sunday interview with Graham Ratcliffe

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 09:45 UK time, Monday, 21 February 2011

This week's special guest was Graham Ratcliffe, the first man to climb Everest twice. Graham's just written a book about Everest's worst ever disaster in 1996 when eight people died in one night after a ferocious storm.

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Radio Scotland Remixed: Day One

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 07:20 UK time, Monday, 21 February 2011

Ricky Ross

Today marks the opening of the week long Radio Scotland Remixed series. Over the next five days, BBC Radio Scotland's music presenters will be taking over each other's shows to bring a flavour of their own musical taste and showcase the wide ranging musical coverage available at BBC Radio Scotland.

Tonight sees Ricky Ross take hold of the reins for Vic Galloway's Monday night slot. The show covers the best new music from the worlds of indie, rock, pop, electronica and everything inbetween and Ricky will be bringing a touch of americana to proceedings. Admiral Fallow will also be in session.

We spoke to Ricky to find out more and you can listen live from 8pm tonight.

What can listeners expect from tonight's show?

I think they will find some new music which they will find very enjoyable. I hope it will get them scurrying to their 'virtual record shops' to find more.

Who would be your ideal guest artist/band and why?

I would love a session from Gram Parsons original Fallen Angels touring band. We would then get an interesting insight into the roots of country rock and, as a bonus, have young Emmylou Harris in the studio too!

In the style of Desert Island Discs, imagine you're stuck on a desert island and have a radio, but it can only tune into one show...what show would you listen to and why?

The best show on Radio is Eddie Mair's 'PM', Eddie asks the questions without all the fuss, pomp and bluster of the old dinosaurs (you can guess who I mean here I'm sure). The show takes time to get to the bottom of stories and is laced with his dry humour. Highlights for me are the appearances of the truly great Hugh Sykes and last year's Upshare, Downshares features. Radio gold.

Admiral Fallow played on the BBC Introducing stage at last year's T in the Park, watch a clip below to get you in the mood for their session tonight.


Greetings from the Alps

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 09:00 UK time, Sunday, 20 February 2011

The Alps

I thought I'd had my fill of snow, but there's something quite different about the kind of stuff we get in December and January, and the glistening, powdery white stuff that falls in the Alps. Or is it just that when it makes life and work more of a challenge than a finely balanced operation, I lose any romantic notions towards it.

This week over 2,000 feet above sea-level, in the hills of Northern Italy, I was blown away by the sheer beauty of nature at it's uninterrupted best. I don't really have a head for heights, but I had to make at least one sacrifice if I was to get the best out of the tranquillity of the hillsides, even although they were teeming with people.

It's a different kind of silence that you get in the hills and slopes as any climber will testify, and it's a great place to be - to get away from the stresses of modern life. I wasn't thinking "Sound of Music" but I was thinking how music can take us into those kinds of peaceful territories too - sweeping you off to other lands even if only for six or seven magical minutes.

Classical music does that - and there is so much to choose from. What banishes the cares of the day for you? What do you like to listen to, just to switch off? The soaring vocals of Pavarotti or Placido Domingo, or from the world of rock is it Freddie Mercury or Bruce Springsteen?

Get in touch with your suggestions.

Newsweek Scotland - A Week in News

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 16:30 UK time, Friday, 18 February 2011



It's been hard to focus this week with interesting ideas zinging around the newsroom like arrows. We've tried to catch a few and turn them into items for the programme.

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Classics Unwrapped: The Classic Art of John Cage

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 16:00 UK time, Friday, 18 February 2011

John Cage, HV2, no. 17b, 1992 Aquatint (using twenty-four plates) Courtesy Crown Point Press © the John Cage Trust

John Cage, HV2, no. 17b, 1992 Aquatint (using twenty-four plates) Courtesy Crown Point Press © the John Cage Trust

Douglas Templeton tells us about this week's Classics Unwrapped feature which features a retrospective of work by American composer and artist John Cage.

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Take the Floor events guide w/c 18 Feb. 2011

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Sam Brennan | 17:15 UK time, Thursday, 17 February 2011

Take the Floor Dancers

Take the Floor, live floor show, The Pearce Institute Govan, Celtic Connections 2011

This week's Take The Floor events guide, featuring the ceilidh dances, traditional and folk music events and classes happening throughout Scotland over the next seven days.

FRIDAY 18th FEBRUARY
Dances
RSCDS East Lothian Branch - Aberlady - Village Hall - Bill Richardson - 7:30pm - *Tickets £5*

RNLI Dance - Queensferry - Queensferry Scottish Country Dance Club

Scottish Country Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Club
Helensburgh - Victoria Halls - Ian Muir

SATURDAY 19th FEBRUARY
Dances
RSCDS Edinburgh Branch - Edinburgh - Reid Memorial Church - Luke & Adam Brady Dance Band

Glasgow - Whitecraigs Tennis Club - Hot Jazz with Alastair McDonald - 7:30pm

Perthshire - Dunkeld - Brinam Hotel - Burns Supper - 7pm - *Tickets £25*

Concerts
Dundee - Wighton Heritage Centre - Dundee Central Library - Cappuccino Concert with Carol Anderson and Martin MacDonald - 11am - *Tickets £5*

Glasgow - City Halls - Recital Room - Babelfish with Posh Quiche, Rura and Vicki Paton - 8pm - *Tickets £10*

Classes
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Fiddle with Karen Hannah - improvers' class - 11am

Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Whistle with Helen Forbes - 12:30pm

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
East Kilbride - East Kilbride Highlanders Association - Calderwood Hall - St Valentine's Day Ceilidh - Dave Husband Sound - 7:30pm-11:30pm - *Tickets £6*

Glasgow - Partick Burgh Hall - Ian Muir - 8pm-11:30pm - *Tickets £7*

Elgin - Miltonduff Hall - The Dandy Band - 7:30pm-midnight - *Tickets £9.50/£6*

Largo Ward - Village Hall - Willie McFarlane - 8pm-11pm - *Tickets £5*

Inverness - Kirkhill Com Centre - Archie MacPhee - 8pm-midnight - *Tickets £5*

Scottish Country Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Clubs
Bridge Of Allan - Keir St Hall - Michael Philip - 7:30pm - *Tickets £6*

Dalbeattie - Town Hall - Kenny Thomson - 7:30pm - *Tickets £8*

SUNDAY 20th FEBRUARY
Dances
Fife - Old Parish Church Hall - Kirk Wynd - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 2-5pm - *Tickets £3*

East Kilbride - Girl Guide Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £2*

Concerts
Glasgow - St Andrew's In The Square - Umoja Gaelica - 8pm - *Tickets £10*

Neilston - Crofthead Hall - Michael Marra - 8pm - *Tickets £12.50

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Club
Montrose - Park Hotel - Johnny Duncan - 2pm-5pm

MONDAY 21st FEBRUARY
Dances
St Andrews, SCD Club - live music from Dierdre Adamson on Accordion (learners welcome) - 7:30pm

Pitlochry, Recreational Grounds (Town Hall if wet) - Highland Nights

Dumbarton - St Patrick's Hall - Strathleven Place - Ceilidh & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm

Scottish Country Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Club
Stirling - Albert Hall - Lothian - 7:30pm - *Tickets £5*

TUESDAY 22nd FEBRUARY
Dances
Westerton Summer Dancing - Bearsden, Westerton Village Hall, Maxwell Avenue, Westerton - Musicians John Renton and Rickie Francie - 7:30-10:30pm

Humbie - Village Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time Club & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Concert
Leith Folk Club - Emily Barker and The Red Clay Halo - *Tickets £8*

Class
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Scots Song - suitable for beginners - 2pm

WEDNESDAY 23rd FEBRUARY
Dances
Carnoustie Scottish Country Dance Club - Carnoustie, Beach Hall, Links Parade - Various Bands - 8-11pm

Newtongrange - Dean Tavern - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Glasgow - St Andrews In The Square - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Midlem - Village Hall - Live Music - Old Time Class (GB Scott) - 8-10pm - *Tickets £2*

Class
Fife - Kenoway Community School - Accordion Class - George Lawrie - 7-9pm - *Tickets £5.60/half price first lesson*

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Club
Dufftown - Memorial Hall - 7:30pm-10pm

THURSDAY 24th FEBRUARY
Dances
RSCDS - Alva, Summer Dance, Cochrane Hall, West Stirling Street - various musicians - 7:30-10:30pm

RSCDS Isle Of Skye Branch - Skeabost - Dance

Concert
Glasgow - St Andrew's In The Square - Live At The Star - Robb Johnson - 8pm - *Tickets £8/£6*

Class
Penicuick - Town Hall - Ceilidh Class - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £2.90/£1.50*

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Accordion & Fiddle Club
Windygates - Greig Institute - Bruce Lindsay - 7:30pm-10:30pm - *Tickets £3.50*

20th-25th FEBRUARY - WINTER SCHOOL
The Royal Scottish Country Dance Society are holding Course 1 of the Winter School in Pitlochry


Tom's Top Tales: Things you can't help being pedantic about...

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 15:00 UK time, Thursday, 17 February 2011

The Tom Morton Show on Wednesday dealt with lyrics and linguistic pedantry. Two subjects close to the heart of BBC Radio Scotland listeners! this came in from Willie:

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The Scots; A Genetic Journey, episode 1

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Alan Braidwood Alan Braidwood | 17:57 UK time, Tuesday, 15 February 2011

One day last year I met with the producer of The Scots: A Genetic Journey, Amanda Hargreaves. Cheekily, I asked what the chances were of asking the programme presenter Alistair Moffat and guests to write us a few words for this blog. I'm pleased to write that this is the first of such posts and this one is to accompany episode 1.

Alistair Moffat: written Thursday 21st October 2010
Off to Cramond to talk to Val Dean about the very early finds she and her archaeological colleagues made at the Roman fort. She showed us huge stands of a shrub called Saracen's Woundwort which is native to the Mediterranean and may have been buried for 2,000 years under the fort. It was disturbed and the seeds brought to the surface - maybe. A good day. And great to be on location again. I've made a lot of telly as a presenter but never done location radio before. Very different - and very good to be in the locations to talk about them. Still, I didn't fret about the weather as much as I used to. And it's wonderful having such a good producer - and not having to do that as well as presenting!

Alistair Moffat and Jim Wilson at work in Jim's office

Alistair Moffat and Jim Wilson at work in Jim's office

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Digging Up your Roots Top Tips - Crime

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Dr Bruce Durie | 16:20 UK time, Tuesday, 15 February 2011

handcuffs

Everybody loves a rogue - and if your family tree is full of upright, clean-living citizens who led blameless lives it can be a bit - well - boring. So there's a delicious thrill at finding an unknown family story, a puzzle or a bit of scandal.

A round-up of some of the sources mention in Programme 5
New Zealand has done a good job of getting newspapers online - Ships and passenger lists - by far the best places to go are ISTG, the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild and, for New Zealand, www.genealogylinks.net, with links to over 400 passenger lists

Crime and punishment
www.nas.gov.uk/guides/crime.asp summarises the various courts and where their records are, as well as prisons and prisoners. There is a great website called www.Blacksheepancestors.com/uk where you can look for Prison records, Convicts, Criminals, Outlaws, Executions, Court Records, legal disputes and other fascinating material

Parish details
The best place for descriptions of parishes are the Statistical Accounts of Scotland. There have been three - one in the 1790s, and again in the 1830s, plus a much more recent one. But the early two were written mostly by the parish ministers and they deal with the history, the local economy, wildlife, topography, agriculture, character of the parishioners and a great deal more. You can get these in most big libraries, or online at EDINA (http://edina.ac.uk), which is a UK national academic data centre - but you'll need to subscribe or get fre access via a University , a local authority or some other subscriber. BUT many of them are downloadable free from electricscotland.com, archive.org and Google Books.

Also go to my favourite free site - scotlandsplaces.gov - and search for place names - lots of lovely stuff there, including land ownership, valuation rolls and tax records from the 1790s. You can see who owned a horse and who had a watch or clock!

Digging up your Roots Sunday at 1205 and available to listen again on iPlayer.


Radio Scotland Remixed

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Paul McFadyen Paul McFadyen | 10:23 UK time, Tuesday, 15 February 2011

Radio Scotland Remixes - presenters logo - version 3

Every weekday evening at 8PM, BBC Radio Scotland hands its airwaves over to DJs with specialist musical knowledge and interest covering a wide variety of genres from jazz to folk to world to country to indie and electronic music and beyond.

The 21st of February 2011 will see these shows coming together and being "remixed" with presenters taking over each others show and throwing the genres into the mixing pot for a week long series entitled "Radio Scotland Remixed".

The schedule looks like this:

Monday - Feb 21 - Ricky Ross
Ricky Ross in for Vic Galloway - alternative music with an Americana flavour.

Tuesday, Feb 22 - Global House

Stephen Duffy in for Mary Ann Kennedy - world music on a jazz trip.

Wednesday, Feb 23 - Travelling Jazz
Bruce MacGregor in for Stephen Duffy - jazz with a distinct touch of folk.

Thursday, Feb 24 - Folk Gathering
Mary Ann Kennedy in for Bruce McGregor - folk music from a global perspective.

Friday, Feb 25 - Another Country with Vic Galloway
Vic Galloway in for Ricky Ross - country music from the edgier side of life.

We'll be speaking to the presenters next week to find out more about what you can expect.

Jeff Zycinski, Head of BBC Radio Scotland, said today: "Since the launch of BBC Radio Scotland, music has played an important part in the schedule and now broadcasts over 50 hours of music programmes each week with a strong commitment to championing Scottish artists, new talent and live music. We have a strong line-up of live music across the year from the recent Celtic Connections, Young Traditional Musician of the Year, and T in the Park in the summer to a weekly mix of jazz, classical, americana, traditional and popular contemporary programmes. This is an opportunity for BBC Radio Scotland's listeners to discover music they never knew they liked when they hear their favourite presenter enthusing and about a different genre of music."

Shereen's Sunday interview with Julia Donaldson

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 14:10 UK time, Monday, 14 February 2011

This week's special guest on the show was Julia Donaldson, author of that phenomenally successful children's favourite The Gruffalo. Julia's been in the news lately leading the campaign to save our libraries, a cause she feels passionately about. Libraries were a big part of her childhood. That's where she cultivated her love of story-telling. When she told me about her childhood it was clear that she was destined to be a children's writer. She was always performing, making up rhymes, singing sons, and putting on shows for her family.

As a student she went busking in Paris, which is how she met her husband Malcolm, also an enthusiastic musician. She tells a wonderful story of Malcolm diving into the Seine in his underpants to retrieve their hat full of money.

Malcolm became a doctor (his job took them to Glasgow) and Julia continued writing songs and stories at home, trying them out on their three young sons.

For Julia, performance is still an important part of her work. She travels the country going to schools, hospitals, libraries, and Book Festivals, not just giving readings but dressing up, acting out, and singing too. Kids love her. It's a family affair too. Her sister often joins her, and Malcolm still likes to get out his guitar. She tells me they have an entire room at home devoted to props and musical instruments.

If you've never seen her perform her work but love the books (as parents and children do alike) then you'll know that the illustrations play a vital part in bringing the stories to life. Julia described to me the long-distance collaboration process with her favourite illustrators. She asked me to tell you that there'll be an exhibition of her illustrators' work at The Park Gallery in Callendar House, Falkirk from 12th March to 2nd May.


Shereen is broadcast every Sunday on BBC Radio Scotland, 0900-1000

Getting Brighter Now

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 09:00 UK time, Sunday, 13 February 2011

Anyone noticed how bright it's getting in the mornings now? Or that our afternoons are getting longer. We're emerging from the sleepy state of winter - I go into something close to enforced hibernation - and I'm enjoying my walks even more now. Even the world of sport is beginning to draw me in, particularly winter sports, and since the ski-ing season is well and truly thriving, if not here as much as Europe, it's good to be able to get some fun out of what was my nemesis for most of December and January. My very first ski-ing trip was to Glencoe and I had the time of my life.

I was two things - fearless and dreadful - no co-ordination and no discipline, but I had the greatest fun of my life while doing sport. From there I went to Europe and while I'm still at the same level as the kids, I think it's just the perfect holiday combination - plenty of fresh air and early nights, in order to hit the slopes first thing. Now I'm beginning to understand why the theme tunes for the majority of these thrill seeking sports are so upbeat - Ski Sunday with Pop Looks Bach by Sam Fonteyn, Formula One used Fleetwood Mac's "The Chain" and BBC's cricket coverage is synonymous with Booker T and the MG's "Soul Limbo"....

Which songs do you associate with sport - Nessun Dorma perhaps? Send me your suggestions

The Greetings Programme is broadcast on BBC Radio Scotland every Sunday 0705-0800

Tom's Top Tales - football memories

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 15:29 UK time, Friday, 11 February 2011

This was emailed in to the show by Gerry Burns.

Your football story request reminded me of my footballing days in the 80's when I played with fellow police shift mates against the likes of a Lawyer Select 11. One of our guys with the nickname Mad Dog was excluded from playing at the request of the Legal lot because of his unsavoury behaviour (bad tackles,swearing,etc...those were his good points) So one afternoon we halfway through our game with the lawyers when the game was interrupted by 'Mad Dog' driving the full liveried Police Landrover across the pitch mid game. Not very community spirited, eh?

Well he was a wee bit upset at being dumped from the team.

I can report that no lawyers were hurt during the incident.

I could tell you also about a few games we played against the Staff and Patients at the State Hospital in Carstairs including one incident where a patient had control of the whistle. The first half lasted 25 minutes. 5 minutes more than the second half. No one protested. Understandable when you were privvy to the reason why our Ref had been incarcerated there in the first instance.

Ah the memories...

So nice to get a cerebral alternative to that Steve Wright on one of the other channels


Gerry Burns
(ex public order specialist)

The Tom Morton show is broadcast on BBC Radio Scotland Monday to Thursday from 1405-1530, and Fridays from 1405-1558

Newsweek Scotland - a look at the Megrahi release affair

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 12:17 UK time, Friday, 11 February 2011

We're having another tilt at the Megrahi release affair this week and trying, as ever, to think laterally. Buried in the flurry of emails between governments and ministers was the observation among Westminster cognoscenti that Kenny Macaskill had apparently been prepared to consider including Megrahi in London's Prisoner Transfer Agreement (although that was always in London's gift, not Edinburgh's) if concessions were made to Scotland on the cost of paying for slopping out in prisons and in granting Scotland powers over air weapons. That was frankly rebutted by the SNP as a misunderstanding but it caused outrage in media circles and at the very least, it was calculated to make you ask yourself if it could be true.

So we did just that. You can play too.

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Thirty Three and One Third

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Ricky Ross Ricky Ross | 10:39 UK time, Friday, 11 February 2011

I seem to spend a lot of my spare time thinking about Bob Dylan. This Bob backwards business has been quite a revelation for me. One thing it's done has made me take in the last 14 years or so of the Dylan canon and try to understand what he was saying and where he was heading. Apart from the catalogue of songs I think Dylan's era coincides perfectly with the phenomenon that we now call the 'album.' It was really the Long Playing Record and at thirty three and a third r.p.m. it was something which was to change our understanding of popular music.

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

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Take the Floor events guide w/c 11 Feb. 2011

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Sam Brennan | 12:10 UK time, Thursday, 10 February 2011

Take the Floor Dancers

Take the Floor: Blair Castle on Nov 22nd 2010 with the Jim Lindsay SDB.

Your weekly list of music and ceilidh events taking place around Scotland.

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Digging Up your Roots top Tips - Religion

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Dr Bruce Durie | 14:00 UK time, Tuesday, 8 February 2011

Bruce Durie

Bruce Durie

Professor Bruce Durie shares some of his top genealogy tips - this week he looks at religion and ancestry.

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The Peri-menopause? Why won't anyone talk about it?

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 11:30 UK time, Tuesday, 8 February 2011

Alison Craig

Alison Craig

Journalist and broacaster, Alison Craig presents an episode of Medical Matters which deals with the subject of Peri-Menopause - she shares some of the hometruths below:

Avert your eyes boys this is not for you.

Really.

As women we talk about everything, EVERYTHING, well everything but this. Here goes.
The change. The peri-menopause. That 4 or 5 years leading up to the menopause.
Told you boys now off you go.

From your late 30 things can go a bit awry, irregular either non-stop rivers of Babylon
Or once in a blue moon. Sleeping goes to pot - my personal nadir and a thousand other symptoms can kick in. Hot flushes, mood swings, low sex drive, weight gain are a few of dozens of symptoms. So you go to the Dr. and they smirk and go ' och it's just the peri-menopause - JUST! Now hang on a minute sunshine... there is no 'JUST' about it.
And whilst we're at it what is the 'peri-menopause' anyway?

So with this in mind, the confusion, ignorance, lack of support I have
just completed a radio programme called Medical Matters which will be broadcast
on the BBC Radio Scotland this Wednesday, repeated on Sunday - but you will get it on the BBC iPlayer if you miss it.

Fascinating stuff. I talk to herbalist Dee Atkinson, specialists Dr. Heather Currie, Professor Mary Ann Lumsden and Dr Ailsa Gebbie and some women who have been there, got the t-shirt and survived the general hell of the whole thing.

It may be something you know all about. If so then you are in the minority.
If, like me you have 10000 questions about the whole thing then tune in. I can promise you lots of interesting facts, figures and information - and even a couple of laughs.
As ever the girls talking helps. It really does.

So this Wednesday BBC Radio Scotland 3.30pm Help is at hand. Or more accurately, ear.

Shereen's Sunday Interview with Rabbi Avraham Soetendorp

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Shereen Nanjiani Shereen Nanjiani | 13:15 UK time, Monday, 7 February 2011

This week saw the return of an old friend to the show. David Dinsmore, formerly Editor of The Scottish Sun, was back with a grand new title, General Manager, News International Scotland. I have no idea what it means (not sure he does either) but it was good to have him back with us again. And just because he's in a more "hands off" role it doesn't mean he's let off the hook over tabloid stories.

David wasted no time in getting in a plug for The News of the World citing the banning of the Pakistan cricketers accused of spot fixing as an example of good undercover investigative journalism ( The News of the World broke the story). Quick as a flash, Robert Dawson Scott chipped in: "Let's hope they didn't get the story through listening in on their phones". Ouch! David took it well and there were plenty more sparky exchanges throughout the show.

Much debate too about the Top Gear presenters getting into trouble over their Mexican jokes. Steve Coogan had just written an article attacking them but the panel couldn't agree on whether this was just harmless fun or "casual racism" with Kirsty Scott at odds with the other two.

In a complete change of tone, my special interview this week was with Holocaust survivor Rabbi Avraham Soetendorp. He's an extraordinary man with a powerful story to tell. You could've heard a pin drop in the studio when we played it. As we never have time to broadcast more then ten minutes there was so much we had to leave out but it's all here on the website. I urge you to listen.

Listen to Shereen Sunday 0900 and available to listen again on BBC Radio Scotland iPlayer.

Dirty Filthy Money

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Simone Byrne Simone Byrne | 12:25 UK time, Monday, 7 February 2011

Lesley Campbell

Dirty Filthy Money, is a new programme on Radio Scotland which explores the ethical impact of money and finance on our lives. Presenter Lesley Campbell tells us more about the programme below:

The name of this series wasn't picked at random. Dirty Filthy Money. We earn it, then throw it away on food we don't eat or on gadgets we don't need. Add to that the issue of bankers' bonuses - vast sums of money paid to those who have lost vast sums of money - and it's not surprising that money's reputation is dirt. We definitely want it, but when we get it, we act as if we have contempt for it.

I used to work in the City, and like most traders, I could tell you exactly how much tax was paid to the Exchequer by financial institutions as if that were the only thing that mattered. Now, it's clear that we might have to find a new way to do things. If your bank is polluting the environment and driving people into poverty, is the amount of tax it paid really relevant?

In this series, I'm going to be looking at three critical areas : tax, wages and debt.

For most of us, tax is deducted at source and our consciences aren't troubled by the lure of trusts, off-shore accounts and tax avoidance schemes ... except when it comes to paying the decorator in cash. But would you consider paying more tax if you knew exactly what the government was going to do with it? Do you trust the government to handle your money in a fair way?

On a profound level, most of us suspect money won't make us happy - we only have to look at lottery winners to know that - but we're still trying to earn as much as we can and borrow as much as we're allowed. Is it because there's too much credit being offered to us and too many cheap goods to be bought with it? Or is it because many of us don't have a church to remind us of more spiritual values?

Wages are a bit of a mystery; it's perfectly clear that those who earn the most do not contribute the most to society. The really big money is earned by footballers, not by nurses in Intensive Care units; it's paid to lingerie models but not to special needs teachers. We allow the market to set wages which means that your worth will be measured by the amount of advertising revenue you generate, not the number of lives you save. If you felt you were receiving a fair wage, perhaps you might be more fulfilled by earning respect from your boss and your colleagues instead of earning cash. How do other countries keep the gap between rich and poor to a minimum while still keeping the economy in the black?

The credit crunch gave us a great opportunity to change the way we manage our money and in many ways, it would be a pity if we get over the shock and go straight back to our old ways. But there are other ways to run our banks, pay wages and gather tax. This might just be the perfect time to be looking at them.

Lesley Campbell was a commodity trader in London for over twenty years. She has advised the World Bank and U.N. on commodity projects and now acts as a consultant to companies wanting to tackle financial risk. She writes on money matters for several publications. Listen to the programme Tuesday 1530, repeated Sunday 1630 and available to listen again on iPlayer.

Greetings: valentines requests

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Cathy MacDonald Cathy MacDonald | 10:00 UK time, Sunday, 6 February 2011

Valentine's day

There can be no doubt that February is the month of love and romance - with or without the extra day, and just because this year errs on the short side, it doesn't mean we can't celebrate halfway through. Exactly. Because February 14th is Valentine's Day. Now, while all the cushioned pink cards in the world don't do a thing for me, I'm always in the mood for a song. Years back love songs tended to be quite slushy - at least to the modern ear - but if you take a moment to listen to some of them, they're actually quite sweet. But the best part about a love song is that it only hits the spot if it has meaning and significance for you - so what one person might find pretty ordinary could be the song that has you reaching for the Kleenex box.

I have quite a varied taste when it comes to romantic songs - I'm not so big on the ballads, but I love the very ordinary, the simple pared back sound of something like The Zutons "Valerie". To me it spells summer, sunshine and happiness. Equally something big like the theme from Love Story - Andy Williams and "Where Do I Begin" - one of the great romantic songs of all time.

What are your favourites? Suggestions please to greetings@bbc.co.uk

Newsweek Scotland: Quality Counts

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Derek Bateman Derek Bateman | 15:59 UK time, Friday, 4 February 2011

BBC Scotland News

I was in a taxi at the lights in Glasgow the other night when a second cab drew alongside. It was covered in BBC Scotland logos promoting our news coverage and my cabbie said: "I see you lot are using my money to advertise yourselves." I didn't want to offend so I said: "Thanks very much".


It's an odd fact that the most frequent quote I get from the public when I tell them what I do is: "Sounds interesting. Where do I find you on the dial". So when we actually set about advertising the station, it's ironic to get complaints. I make the point only to show that sometimes you just can't win. Although I understand the latest numbers show Radio Scotland is winning by increasing listeners.

Personally, I think quality counts over quantity. Which I think is the BBC's new corporate idea so it may be, after all these years, I am finally turning into corporate man. Next I'll be telling you about Creative Futures and Digital Platforms and renaming the blog my Core Brief. Stop it, Derek!....Stop it!

So this week we hear again live from Egypt and analyse what may be happening across the region in, for example, Iran. The Iranians are a young and vital people but as we saw in their revolt after the presidential elections, they are held in check by a ruthless leadership in thrall to the mullahs. Are they eyeing the turmoil as an opportunity for an expansion of the Islamic state? David Pratt of the Sunday Herald, as intrepid a trouble-spot reporter as you''ll find and a good friend of the programme, is there. Dr Rosemary Hollis who travels extensively in the region will join us. She couldn't appear on our New Year's Day programme because she was stuck in Jordan.

I always feel a twinge of sympathy for the folk of Lockerbie whenever that and related stories come up. Like Dunblane or other human tragedies it must trigger feelings in many people even years later. But there's a Wikileaks tale to tell about the release of the convicted bomber Megrahi. The cables show the UK government beavering away behind the scenes to help Libya get him out of a Scottish jail, much more vigorously than we previously knew. And that the Americans who so loudly proclaimed their disagreement with his liberation, were also in the loop. So the Labour government let the SNP take the full rap of public contempt without divulging their sotto voce role. Iain Gray said he would not have released Megrahi. How does that claim look now? We'll speak to Christine Grahame, the Nationalist MSP who is a criminal lawyer, has followed the story closely and who doesn't follow her party line.

We have a new take on the Tesco Tax, now past its sell-by date. We debate our attitude to prisoners and ask if it isn't as Victorian as some of our jails. We join the Lee Jeans women 30 years on and don't forget the highlight of the whole show - Angus Macleod's Saturday paper review! The old curmudgeon from Lewis gets stuck into the burach his fellow hacks have made of the morning press. I'm off to iron my management suit and practice my corporate bull****. Join us at 8.

Another Country with Teddy Thompson

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Ricky Ross Ricky Ross | 14:30 UK time, Friday, 4 February 2011

When I went to Prestwick on holiday as a laddie my father confused me a little. We would stop in the street somewhere in the vicinity and he would point to me, his then 5 year old, and introduce me (jokingly) as his son-and-heir. I heard son in Ayr. It took me years to work out what he meant.

Over the years on AC we've played and me a few sons and heirs.......John Carter Cash, Rosanne Cash, Justin Townes Earle, Jakob Dylan and Harper Simon off the top of my head. They have all managed to move out of the family pile and make a name for themselves standing on their own two feet. This week we will catch up with young Teddy Thompson who is about to bring out his fifth album.

Teddy is not only the son of the great Richard but his mum too is the wonderful Linda Thompson. The good news is he has fulfilled his promise he made to us last year to make and release an album within the year; no mean achievement. The new record comes out on Monday, Bella is the name of the album and Teddy came into Studio 1 to record some live takes of the album tracks. Hear all if them and some interesting and honest conversation from Teddy on Friday.

Yes Rick, I hear you say...and what else? We'll have brand new songs from The Fleet Foxes (Yes!), Abigail Washburn, The Drive By Truckers, Marty Stuart and Wanda Jackson. Pretty good huh? Not only that but we'll pay tribute to Charlie Louvin. And we'll hear some great things from the great lady of country Loretta Lynn. If you don't know them now you'll certainly get to know them on Friday on BBC Scotland at 8 p.m. We are also now going to broadcast a repeat show on Sunday evenings at 10. Catch you then.

Take the Floor events guide w/c 04 Feb. 2011

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Sam Brennan | 12:30 UK time, Friday, 4 February 2011

Take the Floor Dancers

Take the Floor Dancers: Bowhill Community Centre in Cardenden - 25th October 2010.

Take the Floor's weekly guide to the music and dance events taking place around Scotland:

FRIDAY 4th FEBRUARY
Wick - RNLI - Wick RBLS Pipe Band - 9pm - *Tickets £5*

RSCDS - East Lothian Branch - Aberlady - Village Hall - Graeme Munro SDB - 7:30pm - *Tickets £6*

Bearsden - Burgh Hall - John Renton - 7:30pm - *Tickets £8*

SATURDAY 5th FEBRUARY
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Fiddle with Karen Hannah - improvers' class - 11am

Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Whistle with Helen Forbes - 12:30pm

Fife - Largo Ward Village Hall - Live Music - 8-11pm - *Tickets £5*

Glasgow - Whitecraigs Tennis Club - Hot Jazz with Alastair McDonald - 7:30pm

RSCDS Inverness and District Branch - Inverness - Frank Thomson and his Band

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Sorn - Village Hall - Dick Black - 7:30pm-11:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Largo Ward - Village Hall - John White - 8pm-11pm - *Tickets £5*

Inverness - Kirkhill Com Centre - Colin Donaldson - 8pm-midnight - *Tickets £5*

Scottish Country Dances
Dundee - St Andrews Church - Jimmy Boal - 7:30pm - *Tickets £2*

Bridge Of Allan - Keir St Hall - Gordon Shand - 7:30pm - *Tickets £6*

Carlisle - Caldew School - David Cunningham

Inverness - Cauldeen School - Frank Thomson - 7:30pm - *Tickets £6*

SUNDAY 6th FEBRUARY
Fife - Old Parish Church Hall - Kirk Wynd - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 2-5pm - *Tickets £3*

East Kilbride - Girl Guide Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £2*

RSCDS Edinburgh Branch - Edinburgh - Day School

Ceilidh & Old Time Dances
Penicuik - St Mungo's Church Hall - Gary Donaldson - 7:30pm-11:30pm - *Tickets £5*

MONDAY 7th FEBRUARY
St Andrews, SCD Club - live music from Dierdre Adamson on Accordion (learners welcome) - 7:30pm

Pitlochry, Recreational Grounds (Town Hall if wet) - Highland Nights

Dumbarton - St Patrick's Hall - Strathleven Place - Ceilidh & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm

Scottish Country Dances
Stirling - Albert Hall - Lothian - 7:30pm - *Tickets £5*

TUESDAY 8th FEBRUARY
Dundee, Wighton Centre, Dundee Central Library - Scots Song - suitable for beginners - 2pm

Westerton Summer Dancing - Bearsden, Westerton Village Hall, Maxwell Avenue, Westerton - Musicians John Renton and Rickie Francie - 7:30-10:30pm

Humbie - Village Hall - Ceilidh, Old Time Club & Social Dance Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Leith Folk Club - Sharon King and The Reckless Angels - *Tickets £8*

Renfrew Accordion & Fiddle Club - Renfrew - Moorpark Masonic Hall - Roy Hendrie - 7:30pm

Dumfries - Kirkton Village Hall - Live Music - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3/£1.50*

WEDNESDAY 9th FEBRUARY
Carnoustie Scottish Country Dance Club - Carnoustie, Beach Hall, Links Parade - Various Bands - 8-11pm

Newtongrange - Dean Tavern - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 7:30-10pm - *Tickets £3*

Glasgow - St Andrews In The Square - Live Music - Ceilidh & Old Time Club - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £5*

Midlem - Village Hall - Live Music - Old Time Class (GB Scott) - 8-10pm - *Tickets £2*

Cults Accordion & Fiddle Club - Culter Sports & Social Club - The Cheyne Band - 7:45pm

THURSDAY 10th FEBRUARY
RSCDS - Alva, Summer Dance, Cochrane Hall, West Stirling Street - various musicians - 7:30-10:30pm

Penicuick - Town Hall - Ceilidh Class - 8-9:30pm - *Tickets £2.90/£1.50*

Fife - The Button-Key Accordion & Fiddle Club - Windygates - Windygates Institute - Alexander Lindsay & Eddie Rose - 7pm

Glasgow - St Andrew's In The Square - Ian Bruce & Ian Walker - 8pm - *Tickets £9/£7*

4th - 6th FEBRUARY 2011 - SCD WEEKEND
West Lothian RSCDS Branch with Jack Stalker and his Band

Tom's Top Tales, Wednesday February 2

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Tom Morton Tom Morton | 16:20 UK time, Wednesday, 2 February 2011

I think this is probably the best film review I've ever read, part of our 'first film at the pictures' discussion on Tuesday's show, from Sian Gordon.

"Re mothers and Star Wars: When we went to see the original Star Wars film, my mum fell asleep. Fast forward a generation, and we went to see Return of the Sith. The five year old on my knee slept through most of it, and I was sorely tempted to join her."

The Tom Morton Show is on weekdays 1405-1530

More Young Trad Content Online

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Johnny Laville Johnny Laville | 14:36 UK time, Tuesday, 1 February 2011

More exclusive content from BBC Radio Scotland's Young Traditional Musician of the Year final has been added to the Celtic Connections website. As well as a performance featuring winner Kristan Harvey, there's also clips from more of the finalists. Watch a video of singer Alistair Ogilvy performing at the event below. The radio broadcast is available for listen again on BBC iPlayer.



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