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We've made a late change to the schedule tonight at 2000 to put in a programme; Female Sexual Abuse - Breaking the Silence - presented by Penny Marshall. The programme - about women who sexually abuse children - talks to those who have been abused and includes accounts from those who have been abusers.

We have been working on this for a while - and had thought we would broadcast it after the judicial process had run its course in the Vanessa George case. We had expected that to be a little later than now... but the documentary was more or less made by the time of last week's court case ( with the guilty plea ) and so we decided to transmit it a little earlier - with the George case fresh in the memory.

It's a moot point as to how often we should make this sort of change. This one was a tight call. In the end it's a matter of judgement and instinct about when the programme will be at its freshest and/or sharpest for its audience.

So some of the newspaper listings and The Radio Times (through no fault of theirs) is wrong . We have deferred transmission of the programme that was due to be broadcast at 8 pm tonight - the second of a two part documentary series on the attempt to regenerate Morecambe - for a fortnight.

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  • Comment number 3. Posted by TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship

    on 7 Oct 2009 10:15

    #2

    "May have been a 'good call' - but was it really necessary to to have an 'academic' listing the ways women could abuse children? Bit like stating the bleeding obvious and a perverts dream."

    If it's so obvious it would hardly create a "perverts dream" that they had not already found surely, and if it's not so obvious that the above will not have already occurred then listing the various types of abuse might help parent or child minder to detect such abuse.

    In the main I found the programme well balance (even if it didn't discus many issues that the Vanessa George case raises, no doubt due to time restrictions rather than a reluctance on the BBC's to do so), although I do get feed up with the media wheeling out the same charity leaders every time child [sexual] abuse is dealt with - has it never occurred to the media that these charities need to justify their own existence, income flow and jobs, their opinion is not unbiased even if they do hold a (nominally) expert opinion, and as such is their 'expert' opinion being tarnished by the need to justify/keep their funds flowing, thus a perpetual circle of 'abuse' is suggested. Might I suggest that the media find people from primarily either a university or medical background to give an unbiased (truly) expert opinions in future?...

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  • Comment number 2. Posted by gweetperson

    on 6 Oct 2009 23:13

    With the government encouraging/insisting mothers go back to work, what hope do they have? It's very difficult to live on one, below average wage, and I'm sure many parents don't have a 'casual approach' to parenting - they need to survive!

    May have been a 'good call' - but was it really necessary to to have an 'academic' listing the ways women could abuse children? Bit like stating the bleeding obvious and a perverts dream.

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  • Comment number 1. Posted by Richard_SM

    on 5 Oct 2009 18:08


    It's a moot point as to how often we should make this sort of change. This one was a tight call.

    And it was a good call in my opinion. This case raised two issues. First, the matter of sexual abuse by females, which you're addressing in your programme tonight. Second, the age of children (babies) being left in a nursery. The press quoted ages of 12-18 months. That suggests a very casual approach to parenting and ought to prompt some to re-consider their attitude to children and work.

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