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Planet Earth Under Threat

Evidence from the Earth Goes out tonight at 21.02 GMT BBC Radio 4

  • Julian Hector
  • 20 Nov 06, 04:54 PM

gabrielle-portrait-web.jpg

We go out tonight. BBC Radio 4 at 21.02 GMT (92.4-94.6 FM - 198 LW and streamed live on the R4 website). There will be a listen again facility on this blog. Join Gabrielle for the first show and then get on the blog - we run now for 8 consequtive weeks, and then we repeat the whole series. Next week it's "Life on the Move".

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  • 1.
  • At 07:01 PM on 20 Nov 2006,
  • Peter Towers wrote:

Congratulations on getting to broadcast day.

Please can we have the programme as a podcast?

Regards,

Peter Towers

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  • 2.
  • At 01:25 PM on 21 Nov 2006,
  • Sarah wrote:

I enjoyed this prgramme enormously. I found it both informative and accessible.

Like many of the bloggers who have voiced their opinions elsewhere on this site, I have concerns about the carbon cost of producing some of these programmes HOWEVER, I do find the content more 'real' when the presenter is there and is describing what is going on in front of their own eyes AND if a programme like this touches hundreds of thousands of people and encourages them to make positive changes....

I am very curious to know though whether the BBC is monitoring its overall carbon footprint and taking steps to offset it? If so, let's hear about it and if not, why not? As a licence payer this is something I would definitely like to see. Some feedback on this would be appreciated.

Oveall though I find the Natural History output of the highest standard. More programmes like this one please.

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  • 3.
  • At 04:32 PM on 21 Nov 2006,
  • julian Hector wrote:

Good comments - 7 more shows coming up for this series, with much of the material collected from the locations you've heard about in this first programme.

I've read all the blogs around our environmental responsibility. We are talking about our responsibility in the last programme.

for now:

The BBC does have a carbon policy, which is reviewed constantly. Paying our carbon tax is an important question and the answer isn't easy. Friends of the Earth (their Director, Tony Juniper) would argue that it's better corporations give organisations like the the "caron tax" as they specialise in sustained argument against governments, industry etc all over the world. The BBC believes that sourcing its electricity from green sources, making buildings more efficient, managing waster and other environmental good practice is a better way to off set our carbon footprint, than paying a carbon tax show for show. Some NGO's thinking that merely planting trees to off set the generation of carbon is ducking the issue. Efficiency and doing less harmful activity is better. We make decisions about locations on the basis of how much air tme material the location will yield and the benefits of immersing the audience more. Radio budgets are small, so buying long haul flights is considered very carefully. In the natural history unit much of our radio interviewing is done down lines, but there are shows where getting close to nature is key to the experience and apprecition of of the wildlife concerned.

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  • 4.
  • At 12:18 AM on 23 Nov 2006,
  • Rod wrote:

After hearing all the stuff about Greenland warming etc. I thought I would see if I could find any temperature data:

I discovered the following paper from the
Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia. http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/greenland/vintheretal2006.pdf This gives data from results in the compilation of instrumental data for 13 stations along the southern and western coasts of Greenland that date back to 1784. It shows that the warmest period was in 1930's and 40's and the warmest year was 1941. Maybe the BBC should mention this as well:-)

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  • 5.
  • At 05:54 PM on 07 Dec 2006,
  • Sarah wrote:

Thank you, Julian for your response and I take on board your point that the BBC is careful how it sources its power/makes sure its buildings/equipment are energy efficent - quite right! So it should be!

However also think it should be making efforts to offset those emissions it does make. Yes, less harm is best, but as we all do harm then we need to take steps to 'make amends'. Careful choice of organisation chosen to fulfill this is required. I understand that 'merely planting trees' is not enough; some of these organisations put money into funding projects working on reducing energy consumption for the long term benefit of all.

Again, I would appreciate it if these comments could be passed onto someone with the authority to make the difference required.

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