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World Cup in focus (3)

Phil Coomes | 08:26 UK time, Friday, 18 June 2010

Denis Paquin, deputy director of photography at Associated Press, explains how the latest range of digital cameras has allowed photo editors to crop a picture in many ways to suit various outlets.

"The emergence of digital cameras in the news business brought forward the speed by which we could deliver the image to our viewers.
 
"Naturally there were drawbacks. From the rendition of colors that were not true to life to the pixilation of images when they were enlarged. The newest batch of 16.1 megapixel digital cameras offer the kind of high resolution never scene before - even with film. This now us allows editors to see 'photos within a photo' when editing.
 
"The photo below gives an example of how cropping an image emphasized the moment when Portugal's Cristiano Ronaldo, faced off against Ivory Coast's Guy-Roland Demel during their match on June 15th.
 
"By seeing a 'photo within a photo', we were able to highlight the intensity of the confrontation. The top photo was the original as shot by the photographer. In the editing process we cropped the photo twice, giving publications the opportunity to either use the image as a vertical or a horizontal."

Cristiano Ronaldo and Guy-Roland Demel

Cristiano Ronaldo and Guy-Roland Demel

Cristiano Ronaldo and Guy-Roland Demel

Related posts:

World cup in focus (2): Rob Green
World cup in focus (1): The logistics

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