Global temperature update

Friday 7 September 2012, 16:27

Paul Hudson Paul Hudson

Global temperatures in August were 0.34C above the 30 year running average, according to the UAH satellite measure, showing a small increase on the previous month, shown below.



It's the 3rd warmest August in this particular satellite data set which began in 1979.

Using the more standard 1961-1990 average used by the World Meteorological Organisation, global temperatures were approximately 0.593C above average.

The recovery in global temperatures since the turn of the year has in part been due to a rise in sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, as 'La Nina' conditions faded, shown below.



Most computer predictions expect positive sea surface temperature anomalies in this part of the world to persist into next year, with weak El Nino conditions becoming established.

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    Comment number 1.

    'Most computer predictions expect positive sea surface temperature anomalies in this part of the world to persist into next year, with weak El Nino conditions becoming established'

    Predictions are starting to move towards a positive neutral scenario through next year which means that there will be no large release of heat from the oceans and no replenishment of heat into the oceans.
    Unfortunately that could be the start of lower global temperatures, time will tell.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 2.

    The relatively low UAH figure for August was mainly due to falling temperatures (as reflected in AQUA CH5), from about the 10th to the 21st of the month.
    During the remainder of the month, temperatures fell much more slowly than is normal at that time of year, resulting in higher temperature anomalies. The mean anomaly for the last 7 days was probably around 0.39c.
    This situation has continued during the first few days of September, and there was actually quite a large rise in temperature on Sept. 4th.
    It's early days yet, but this may point to quite a moderate increase in the anomaly for September, relative to August. This would, of course, apply to other temperature anomaly series.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 3.

    Stll no global warming since 1998. Why are we still wasting money on uneconomic windmills that destabilise the national grid and wreck the country's finances? A rather expensive vanity project.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 4.

    I’ve heard it said that global temperatures have risen 1 degree C over the past century.

    http://junksciencearchive.com/MSU_Temps/NCDCabs1880.html

    Tell that to the NCDC.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 5.

    Ironically both the 'AGW- Co2 warming camp' and the 'solarist cooling camp' are now predicting the Jet Stream to move southward with concomitant weather changes to back up both belief systems. Could they both be wrong?

 

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Hello, I’m Paul Hudson, weather presenter and climate correspondent for BBC Look North in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. 

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I worked as a forecaster with the Met Office for nearly 15 years locally and at the international unit, after graduating with first class honours in Geophysics and Planetary physics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1992. I then joined the BBC in October 2007, where I divide my time between forecasting and reporting on stories about climate change and its implications for people's everyday lives.

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