Summer is here at last

Thursday 4 July 2013, 16:53

Paul Hudson Paul Hudson

Summer is with us at last, with high pressure now building across the country.

 

A very weak weather front on Sunday may increase cloud for a time possibly leading to one or two showers. There is also a chance of a little sea fret at times along the coast.

 

But most of us will see a lot of very warm sunshine in the coming days.

 

And we’ve waited some time for it. It’s the first prolonged warm spell of summer weather since July 2006.

 

That’s more an illustration of just how bad summers have been in recent years, rather than it being anything out of the ordinary.

 

It also means that the Great Yorkshire Show, the biggest agricultural show in England, will enjoy a dramatic change of fortunes next week.

 

Last year the show was cancelled, the only time it has happened because of adverse weather in its 155 year history.

 

This year the only problem will be cooling the livestock, with temperatures at the showground in Harrogate likely to approach 80 degrees Fahrenheit at times.

 

The good news is that the atmosphere will become ‘blocked’ and such patterns can take a long time to break down.

 

It means that the fine weather is likely to last until the middle of July.

 

After that, there is a signal for more unsettled conditions to develop.

 

But that’s a long way off in forecasting terms.

 

For now, confidence is high that warm summery weather will be with us for some time to come.  

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    Comment number 1.

    Hello Paul,
    Following on from one of your previous posts about AMO and a period of low solar activity... I spotted (I think) a noctilucent cloud at around 02.00hrs on July 01/02. I only had my mobile phone camera with me and took a couple of shots of it. It was in the Northern sky seen from Hornsea at a Latitude of about 54 degrees North.

    Is the current weather pattern more or less likely to result in the appearance of these clouds for the next couple of months please?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 2.

    There was quite a lot of dry, sunny, settled weather in June 2010 - though mainly in southern Britain (I think Yorkshire counts as 'north').

  • rate this
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    Comment number 3.

    I'm sure the current spell of hot dry weather will last right up until the day the kids break up for summer holidays!

  • rate this
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    Comment number 4.

    It won't actually be warm... it's just the thermometer telling you it is after being tampered with!

    It's a marxist plot from european commissioners to make you turn off your heating! Don't fall for it brothers, keep those fleeces on and the coal burning!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 5.

    Interestingly the high pressure cell involved looks more like a polar one rather than the subtropical high pushing northward.

    Meanwhile there is low pressure over the Mediterranean which is a winter type scenario for Europe.

    Might be different matter if it sinks back over France to give us a southerly flow but I can't see that on the charts yet so likely few records will be broken.

 

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Hello, I’m Paul Hudson, weather presenter and climate correspondent for BBC Look North in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. 

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I worked as a forecaster with the Met Office for nearly 15 years locally and at the international unit, after graduating with first class honours in Geophysics and Planetary physics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1992. I then joined the BBC in October 2007, where I divide my time between forecasting and reporting on stories about climate change and its implications for people's everyday lives.

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