Weather

With no sign of any change to prevailing weather conditions, it’s turning into a remarkable winter.

Based on the England and Wales rainfall data set, the longest of its kind anywhere in the world which began in 1766, January was the second wettest on record, beaten only by January 1948.

And, according to Philip Eden writing in the Sunday Telegraph, January has turned out to be the most cyclonic January in 142 years of records.

It graphically illustrates the complete lack of settled weather throughout the month.

Most notable for rainfall has been South East and Central Southern England; both areas have had their wettest January since modern records began in 1910.

In our region, Coningsby in Lincolnshire recorded 90.2mm of rain, compared with the average of 49.9mm. This was just short of the station’s record which was set in 1988 (93.6mm).

At Leeming in North Yorkshire 114.8mm of rain fell, compared with the average of 54.9mm. This was short of the record which was set in 1948 (128.8mm).

Let’s not forget December was the stormiest December since statistical analysis of pressure patterns began in 1969; it was also the windiest of any month since 1993.

The UK’s weather will continue to be dominated by low pressure at least until the middle of February, with further appreciable rainfall to come.

As a consequence winter 2013/2014 is sure to end up one of the wettest on record.

Comments

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  • Comment number 52. Posted by NeilHamp

    on 11 Feb 2014 19:06

    2013/14 one of the wettest winters on record?

    I doubt it. Met office records for England back to 1910 are at:-

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/pub/data/weather/uk/climate/datasets/Rainfall/ranked/England.txt

    Jan 2014 is top of the list, but only just
    In November 2013 was only 65th. on the list
    In December 2013 was 20th on the list.

    I can't see this winter topping the list. We shall have to wait for the February figures for an overall winter set of data

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  • Comment number 51. Posted by ashleyhr

    on 10 Feb 2014 18:10

    Yes David Nutt. He slammed government Ministers for not following 'science' on drugs policy (when, if I recall correctly, they reclassified a drug from Class B to Class A).

    It does appear that Pickles has, as I expected, won the 'headless chicken' award.

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  • Comment number 50. Posted by quake

    on 10 Feb 2014 12:15

    David Nutt?

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  • Comment number 49. Posted by Paul Latham

    on 10 Feb 2014 11:55

    #40 newdwr54

    A couple of points you raise:-

    Firstly sea level rise. To what do you refer? The cyclonic effect upon sea level, or something else. The strong wave action and high waves along the coasts is due to the strength of the wind.
    We are experiencing a prolonged bout of adverse weather, That is all.

    Secondly, dredging. This has been neglected for two reasons. (i) The influence of tiny minority groups who complain about the so-called impact on wild life and (ii) Budgetary reasons. The amount of money being spent on such routine environmental work, is much reduced and has been for decades. We still pay our increased council taxes and central govt. taxes towards this.

    At last Eric Pickles, Secretary of State at the DCLG, who has taken over some of the duties of the environment minister at present, has acknowledged that govt. inaction is to blame.

    Are you saying that dredging is wrong?

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  • Comment number 48. Posted by mikemock

    on 10 Feb 2014 11:14

    Westcountry breaks free as floods continue..
    Mikes latest cartoon from Devon..
    http://mikemock.wordpress.com/

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  • Comment number 47. Posted by waikuku

    on 10 Feb 2014 09:20

    And there we have it! Chris Smith unaware of the EAs strategic policy (from 2008) to allow the somerset levels to flood more frequently. (R4 Today about 0815). So yes, whilst it has been raining quite a bit - the impacts have been significantly more damaging by such a crass policy.

    It is a dubious policy but explains a great deal about the lack of apparent drainage management. It is also a spectacular admission of Smith as Chair and the driving force behind the EA's strategy that he was blissfully unaware of the 2008 policy document. Time for him to ship out.

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  • Comment number 46. Posted by ashleyhr

    on 10 Feb 2014 03:37

    With typos CORRECTED:

    I'm not really a fan of his but I look forward to possible comments by David Nutt on the apologising by Eric Pickles (who has stepped into the breach after Owen Paterson was taken ill - and appears to be 'shooting from the hip' and also trying to be party political after Labour claims in effect that "all those Cobra meetings were useless because they haven't managed to stop it raining").
    .
    Sometimes politicians CHOOSE to ignore current or well-established science, as otherwise they might become (more) unpopular! In this case with Pickles claiming, without any supporting evidence whatsoever, that relevant 'experts' don't know what they are talking about and "we should have ignored them" on dredging. This MIGHT make stressed members of the public - who might support them at the next General Election - feel a little better.

    Chris Smith has not exactly helped his own (possibly just) cause.

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  • Comment number 45. Posted by ashleyhr

    on 10 Feb 2014 03:34

    I'm not really a fan of his but I look forward to possible comments by David Nutt on the apologising by Eric Pickles (who has stepped into the breach after Owen Paterson was taken ill - and appears to be 'shooting from the hip and also trying to be party political after Labour claims in effect that "all those Cobra meetings were useless because they haven't managed to stop it raining").
    .
    Sometimes politicians CHOOSE to ignore current or well-established science, as otherwise they might become (more) unpopular! In this case with Pickles claiming, without any supporting evidence whatsoever, that 'experts' don't know what they are talking about and "we should have ignored them" might make stressed members of the public - who might support them at the next General Election - feel a little better.

    Chris Smith has not exactly helped his own (possibly just) cause.

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  • Comment number 44. Posted by john_cogger

    on 10 Feb 2014 01:43

    http://www.sciencemediacentre.org/expert-reaction-to-somerset-flooding/

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  • Comment number 43. Posted by waikuku

    on 9 Feb 2014 21:06

    @40 newdwr54

    I think you may have missed the point rather spectacularly and go on in line 2 with a somewhat patronising comment.

    A point made by folk currently and over the last two decades who have been flooded. A great deal of flooding has been prolonged due to poor maintenance of drains, dikes, rivers and canals. This lack of maintenance has either been by design or ignorance - I suspect a mixture of both.

    You are right, politicians (nor anyone) can't stop the high rainfall but as I have said before - it is not necessarily an indication of 'something afoot'. If the weather at our latitude is somewhat random then look at the possible system variants, geographic expanse they cover and how rainfall is distributed within those systems. Then take a look at the area concerned with the (recent) record high rainfall - it is not difficult to imagine that on a great % of occasions most of that rain will fall over the sea or up slopes of high ground. This time the random distribution has dumped it on a relatively small area with some issues not least the population living there.

    "Dredging wont stop the flooding" - agreed.

    "At best it will reduce the level of the floodwater" - not quite, it will do that but the water will likely get away far more rapidly, and that might be all that the flooded folk actually want.

    The wider problem you elude to? Well let us know what that is and we might have a comment or two I'm sure.

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