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29 Aug 06, 11:42 AM - Staying in is the new going out

Posted by Crippled Monkey

If, like most of us, you're a day behind because of the bank holiday and haven't got your Friday night organised yet, here's something to add to the calendar. A new nightlcub called Wheelies officially opens its doors this Friday, the 1st September, at 9pm UK time.

Owned by Simon Stevens, who has cerebral palsy, Wheelies aims to make guests feel comfortable about disability as well as dancing, drinking and just plain having a good time.

But this isn't a normal nightclub - you can go clubbing without even leaving the couch because Wheelies is totally virtual, and it's only accessible via your computer. It's part of 'SecondLife' - a virtual, online 3D world built entirely by its 500,000 residents worldwide. (www.secondlife.com)

There's lots happening on the launch night - a live DJ, a live singer and free food. Although how you eat virtual food is something we haven't quite worked out yet...

For more information you can contact Simon at simon.stevens@enableenterprises.com

Comment

At 04:50 PM on 05 Sep 2006, Mary wrote:

If my condition is ever so bad that I get confused between a fun night out clubbing and dancing, and a night in at home with my laptop, then will someone please prompt me to book that "special" one-way trip to the Swiss clinic please?

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At 09:47 AM on 27 Sep 2006, Mike wrote:

Don't knock it till you've tried it. Second Life and Wheelies Nightclub is a great way to spend the night if you aren't going out and there is nothing on TV. It's a lot more fun than you think. You get to hear live DJ's and music streamed over the net and speak to real people from around the globe. Till you've tried it don't diss it. A lot of people get greatcomfort from being able to do such things and some people are housebound.

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At 10:25 AM on 06 Jun 2007, Kopilo wrote:

Mary, you have missed the entire point of what Simon has accomplished, it isn't substitution at all.

The point is that he couldn't go out and socialise and SL gives him a platform so that he can meet his needs (ie socialisation) even in his current physical state.

This gives him an escape from reality, a breath from being physically unable to do things.

Besides that point, SL is a great way to network with people from all over the world. To gain perspectives which may not be abled to be gained in the geographical region due to culture, social or other conforms.

Also SL gives developing artists both music, graphic, programming, etc a way of having more exposure which they can not just gain in their day to day life, if you like in a similar way to myspace, except the music can be played live.

~Kopilo Hallard, virtuality developer.

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At 06:53 PM on 15 Aug 2007, Christine wrote:

I have been in Secondlife for over two yrs.now. Anything you can do in your first life,you can do in your Secondlife,including meeting the love of your life.I meet my husband in Secondlife which would not have been possible in our first life.Why because I am from America and he is from England.Secondlife not only brings people together,but allows you to express all the hidden talents that you never knew you had.Join us in our wonderful Secondlife,I'll treat you with a night out on the town! :)

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