On Winterwatch Unsprung I want to answer all of your wildlife questions.

From unrecognisable sounds to unidentified objects or strange animal behaviours, send me your questions on Twitter, Facebook or using the 'Comments' button below, then tune in to Winterwatch Unsprung to find out the answers.

Winterwatch Unprung is on web and Red Button at 9pm on Monday, 9.30pm on Tuesday and 10pm on Thursday. On Wednesday Unsprung is at 9.30pm on BBC Two.

Vapourer moth eggs by Joanna Clegg

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments.

  • Comment number 49. Posted by Barbara

    on 31 Jan 2014 16:21

    I have been keeping 2 chickens in the garden for over a year now. The chicken feed pellets are now being eaten by robins and dunnocks (at least 4 of each). Does this mean I shall be increasing the population of both birds or will chicken pellets have a detrimental effect on their health?

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 49: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 49: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 48. Posted by Michael Casey

    on 24 Jan 2014 10:34

    Pine Marten visiting squirrel feeder during daylight hours.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CmZvs8ubw8

    Michael Casey
    Sligo Ireland

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 48: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 48: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 47. Posted by Michael Casey

    on 24 Jan 2014 10:19

    Question for unsprung.
    I have Pine Martens visiting my Red Squirrel feeder. Up until a week ago they only visited under cover of Darkness. This last week they have started to come during daytime with several visits around midday. Would you have any suggestions as to why this change in behaviour has taken place. I have noticed this happen in previous years but it usually happened from April on. I assumed this was due to increase in food needs due to pregnancy and/or recently born young coupled with shorter night time hours. This seems very early in the year for them to be appearing during daylight hours.
    Regards and Thanks,
    Michael Casey
    Sligo Ireland.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 47: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 47: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 46. Posted by Alana

    on 23 Jan 2014 21:57

    We live in the countryside in Scotland, and we are aware of both a pair of buzzards and a pair of tawny owls living near our house, and nesting close by too. Would they ever cross paths- and would they ignore one another?

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 46: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 46: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 45. Posted by raymond

    on 23 Jan 2014 19:23

    i have a robin who has been coming to feed for over 2 months the unusual thing is he is bald he has no head covering and not so many chest feathers but is quite feisty and attacks any other robins that come into the garden why is he so bald
    ray

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 45: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 45: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 44. Posted by yellowbellygirl

    on 23 Jan 2014 12:30

    Hi Unsprung
    This morning driving through Great Shelford just outside Cambridge I spotted what I like to call a 'skewbald' or 'tortoiseshell' squirrel! It had a white and ginger body and a white and grey tail. I know melanistic and albino squirrels are often seen, but I wondered whether this colour combination is also well-known? Thanks, and loving the show!

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 44: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 44: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 43. Posted by auntiecarrie

    on 23 Jan 2014 12:04

    Over the years many larger birds have adapted to using hanging garden feeders, for example in my garden in particular we regularly have pigeons, jackdaws and magpies on the feeders. These are fairly large birds and if they can manage to feed quite successfully on hanging feeders I'm wondering why blackbirds don't seem to be able to manage it (in fact I've never actually ever seen one attempt it). Is it something to do with their anatomy maybe?

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 43: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 43: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 42. Posted by Russetts

    on 23 Jan 2014 11:58

    I always feed the birds in winter with a variety of food. However I am vey distressed to find that again this year I am losing finches to that horrible disease whose name I can neither remember or spell! Last year it attacked green finches and this year I have lost 4 goldfinches to date. Please what would you suggest I do? I always change and disinfect the feeders when they are empty. I wonder if I should stop feeding altogether, but I know that my neighbours are feeding the birds too.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 42: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 42: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 41. Posted by dawn1907

    on 22 Jan 2014 19:56

    Maybe a silly question, but why don't animals have belly buttons?

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 41: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 41: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 40. Posted by AllanG

    on 22 Jan 2014 16:37

    An enigma wrapped in a puzzle tied prettily with a conundrum. last night whilst watching Winterwatch (this is absolutely true, I swear) I looked up and watched a bat fly around the lounge. I think, judging by its size that it is a pippistrelle. It was looking frantically for an escape and clearly I was not going to e able to catch it. I opened the patio doors and after a few more circuits it found the exit and flew off into the rain. Now, the question is, where did it come from? The doors were shut, the patio doors had not been opened for at least two months. There is no access from the attic, also not opened for some months. there are no droppings anywhere certainly no flying insects for forage! a very strange and interesting experience.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 40: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 40: 0
    Loading…
More comments

More Posts

Previous

Next