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What is this?

Mystery picture - can you guess what it is?

 

Well done to everyone who got it right. It is a midge larva. And here's how the adult looks.

The answer to the Springwatch mystery picture quiz is a midge larva.

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  • Comment number 120. Posted by Andrew Morrison

    on 5 Jun 2013 12:21

    re last nights quiz.
    This was not a "Midge" larvae - it was a "Phantom Midge" larvae.
    There is a BIG difference.

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  • Comment number 119. Posted by PieterK

    on 5 Jun 2013 00:32

    Definitely not THE mitch as we know it in Scotland!!

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  • Comment number 118. Posted by Heather

    on 4 Jun 2013 21:13

    In late Feb my pond was seething with mating frogs. Few days later, found a dead adult frog on surface followed by two more within the next few days. Could these be females exhausted by the spawning or has something else happened ? We did have a very cold few days following spawning and the spawn froze into a block of ice but nevertheless produced hundreds of tadpoles on thawing. Any ideas on the frog deaths..... could they have frozen to death in the cold snap?

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  • Comment number 117. Posted by westwell ranger

    on 4 Jun 2013 20:06

    Great comment doc, this is the problem with the programme whilst inspiring the younger generation, unless Chris is commenting the content can be scientifically inaccurate or pandering to the viewers who think that all of nature just gets along in a fluffy world, rather than the reality of life and death.
    Great that the programme to encourage kids to engage in the natural world.

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  • Comment number 116. Posted by doc

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:54

    Hi Springwatch. Fantastic programme but for goodness sake consult an entomologist. You showed midge larvae, midge pupae(dead) and midge adults. Sadly, none of the ones you showed bite anybody. They are actually one of the "non-biting midges". The "biting midges" belong to a different family and are very much smaller and don't swarm over water.
    Doc.

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  • Comment number 115. Posted by westwell ranger

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:53

    Poor Chris, having to put up with the other two, why? Because Chris really knows his subject and is a real naturalist and understands the natural world, red in tooth and claw.

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  • Comment number 114. Posted by peter

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:38

    Why not put another nest box for the intruder Jackdaws, this may save the chicks from being killed. As this is not interfering but providing another nest site?!

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  • Comment number 113. Posted by Fossil

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:36

    Hello! from Saltburn by the Sea,
    I once saw a Jenny Wren feeding its young in the nest. The nest was in the ivy in my garden.
    I quickly grabbed my camera @ sat under a tree nearby, with a tartan rug over my head.
    I waited a while, to my surprise it wasn't a wren that turned up to feed, it was a Robin.
    It came back time after time. I got some good shots of the Robin feeding but, none of the Wren.
    I sat there for over an hour, no wren.
    I called time as my bum was numb.
    As soon as I got inside, yes!, the Wren turned up and feed the young Robins.
    Is this unusual?
    Cheers

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  • Comment number 112. Posted by Michael White

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:31

    WRENS: The wrens in my garden are similar size as on the program but they have what looks like, a large eye on each wing. Is this usual ?
    Michael.

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  • Comment number 111. Posted by Dolphins

    on 4 Jun 2013 19:28

    midge larve. Can u just say thank you thank you thank you springwatch for showing a preview of dolphins. I have been waiting a long time to see them and that was the best 3-4 minutes of tv history. :)

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