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Unsprung is back!

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Gavin Boyland Gavin Boyland | 10:49 UK time, Thursday, 15 September 2011

It's only a matter of weeks now till Autumnwatch goes live and we hope you're as excited as we are to hear that Unsprung is also set to return.

Unsprung is going to be a little different this year. As Martin is more and more involved in the main show he's handing the production over to me and the team. We'll be keeping the much-loved Unsprung tone and popping in a few new surprises to keep the presenters on their toes so naturally we'll be needing your help!

The Unsprung team

Becky, Gavin and Sam with a Springwatch Unsprung VIP

Unsprung is your part of the show, your chance to get any question answered, share your videos and photos, and let us know about your experiences of autumn. This is our first week in the office and already we'd love to hear from you. So let's get things going: you can post any questions you've got by commenting below, keep adding your autumn snaps on our photo group and get chatting on Facebook.

We're also really keen to see your autumn videos, particularly if there's a mystery or story involved; we'll be setting up a page so you can upload them here shortly.

We're buzzing with ideas to make the show even more fun and interesting but if you have any ideas of what you'd like to see let us know.

We can't make the show without you, so please do get involved. We can't wait to hear from you!

Gavin Boyland is the Producer of Autumnwatch Unsprung

Update 26 October: This post is now closed for comments. If you'd like to ask a question or share a story with the Unsprung team please comment on this post.

Comments

Page 1 of 2

  • Comment number 1.

    I'd love to see the return of the interactive quiz - via the red button. We loved getting involved in that.

  • Comment number 2.

    I agree - the interactive quiz was great & my daughter could play along at University while I played at home, then we compared results. The quiz where you post answers on facebook, blog or twitter is all very well if you have a computer in the same room as your TV - for me it means running up and down stairs a lot!

    I'd also like to have Nick Baker brought onto Unsprung again, to talk us through Autumn/Winter for bugs - and another Geek Quiz between him and Chris Packham would be awesome!

  • Comment number 3.

    Facebook quiz is ok - but there are so many fans on there, as soon as you post, there's another 100 or so comments, so there's no chance of your answer getting a response, similarly with questions
    I'm not one for shunning tech - but in this situation, I'd prefer to go back to the red button rather than facebook

  • Comment number 4.

    Hi All!
    It's the Teacosy lady again!
    Just to let you know I have sent a new cosy for this Autumn. Also a small suprise for Chris. Have posted to Bristol so I hope you get them.
    Looking forward to the show
    Lynne

  • Comment number 5.

    Hi, I would love to know more about 'Orb' spiders. We have been watching a couple of them (females?) that have spun big webs just outside our loungeroom window. Do the team know how much / many webs a spider can spin - i.e. if a web was damaged could a spider spin another full web straight away? Also, they always seem to be head down and on the same sides of their webs, is this the same for all spiders of this kind? Any info would be good, I don't really like spiders, but find them quite fascinating! Looking forwards to your return

  • Comment number 6.

    Here's a question for Unsprung,
    Any ideas on why we have got a bumper fruit crop this year and the fact that it seems to be early, I know we had great weather in april for the pollination season but are there any other factors such as the last two severe winters?

  • Comment number 7.

    Hi would love to know what some of our migrating birds are known as when they reach their destinations - is a cuckoo still a cuckoo, and what about ospreys? Perhaps you could use their dual names as a quiz question.

  • Comment number 8.

    red button quiz was great :).
    and I want to know more about Kate's bee keeping adventures!! get a camera to wales!

  • Comment number 9.

    I have just taken the first Hedgehog to hospital it was outside on the lawn this afternoon, and underweight, although I have been putting food out every night, obviously not enough. Please keep an eye open for hogs outside during the daytime now. AND remember NO milk.

  • Comment number 10.

    Definately keep the bit where the public get to grill the presenters! That was brilliant last year. Working on concocting a tough one for Chris :-D

  • Comment number 11.

    The 'geek of the year awards' are good and everthing but I think the team should do a 'young naturalist of the year award' Lots of young people are making a huge effort to conserve and monitor wildlife and deffiatey deserve some recogination.

  • Comment number 12.

    It would be great to have a feature with tips to help identify differences between Crows, Rooks, Ravens and Jackdaws...maybe a good one to do whilst filming at Slimbridge...a great rookery there...lots of noises and splats! Hope to see you there ;-)

  • Comment number 13.

    as a wildlife artist and living in the area I would love to bring my scraperboard work to show you.Birds from Slimbridge feature highly

  • Comment number 14.

    Is it normal for slugs and snails to eat birdseed? Especially when they have to slither up a wall and then go to the top of the window to reach a plastic feeder of seed which is stuck to the glass? I thought the sharp seed would irritate their skin, but sometimes there are a dozen or so, all having a party in the feeder.

    I can send you in a photo if it’s of interest.

  • Comment number 15.

    I would love either Nick or Chris to put me out of my torment over Ladybirds. How do they communicate, they don't appear to make any noise, yet they get together in big groups. I have even found a group of about twenty hiding in the back of our hay barn completely hidden. How did they subsequent one know that the first one was ther ?

  • Comment number 16.

    Thanks for all your questions everyone! Keep them coming - we've got eight whole programmes to fill!

    The video uploader should be up early next week too.

    Sam :)

  • Comment number 17.

    Robert Jones - ladybird communication is largely chemical, particularly at this time of year. The large aggregations, such as you mention, are formed when a single individual finds somewhere good, and it then produces a long-lasting aggregation pheromone, which attracts in other ladybirds in the vicinity. At other times of year - eg during the summer - they aggregate around food supplies, akin to students around a free buffet

  • Comment number 18.

    Durhamranger 6, We didn't have a bumper crop, but I had enough apples to make about 70 litres of wine.
    ninjacaz 8, We used to be beekeepers. Photos available...

  • Comment number 19.

    Ive noticed where I live the holly berries are turning from green to orange this year does any one know how long they take to go red? Have they any at the arboritum and will they be able to tell us anything about this xmas greenery?Im in Fawley sort of new forest.

  • Comment number 20.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 21.

    I keep finding acorns buried in molehills in my horses field. There isn't an oak tree for miles around.
    What is planting these acorns and why?

  • Comment number 22.

    wendy 21 Horses, being known to be very tidy animals, probably buried the acorns.

  • Comment number 23.

    When I was a child, I learnt a rhyme, 'Swan swam out to sea, Swim, swan, swim!
    Swan swam back again, Well swum, swan! Do swans swim in the sea? And do birds that swim in salt water need special 'feather protection' to stop their feathers becoming salt encrusted? Thank you.

  • Comment number 24.

    Hi guys, thanks for all the comments and questions, keep them coming, less then two weeks now till the first show!

    @wendybroughton that's very intriguing, if you have any pictures could you pop them onto our photo group (http://www.flickr.com/groups/bbcautumnwatch/%29, it would great to take a look at them.

    Cheers,

    Gavin

  • Comment number 25.

    Gavin Boyland
    You are probably aware that on 7 October neither BBC Wales nor BBC NI are showing Unsprung live - therefore it cannot be interactive unless it is available to them live on iplayer. In Wales it doesn't get shown until 11.00 pm - because of BBC Wales' addiction to blanket sport. A scheduling DISGRACE.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbpointsofview/NF1951574?thread=8280038
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbpointsofview/NF1951566?thread=8279861&post=110412740#p110412740

  • Comment number 26.

    Ashley hr lives in England. He has been conducting a vitriolic campaign against the amount of rugby shown on BBCWales for a number of years not just when AW or AW Unsprung are on. He is of course entitled to use these blogs as a vehicle for his opinions (he has already had one go on "Announcing Autumnwatch Live 2011") but I think it is important that readers are aware of the context in which he makes his complaint.

  • Comment number 27.

    If I lived in Wales I would also be complaining 'vitriolically' I can assure you.

  • Comment number 28.

    Hi everyone at Unsprung - looking forward to the new shows. Over the last few sweltering days I can't help wondering if the 'Indian' Summer will affect migrations & even delay hibernations & encourage thoughts of nest -building in our feathered friends? Could this be detrimental to some species? Or are these behaviours directed more by day length & internal hormones...?

    Lots of luck with Autumnwatch 2011

  • Comment number 29.

    question for the team. What effect (if any) has the run of poor summers had on the bat population in the uk?

  • Comment number 30.

    Durham... 29 Because of the warm weather and shorter days, we have been sitting in the garden when bats usually arrive (st Albans) and we saw two a couple of nights ago and one last night. We usually see more.

  • Comment number 31.

    I wish there was a more direct means of getting in contact, hopefully this works!

    I think Spring and Autumnwatch could put together a nature and wildlife calendar covering what's going on around the UK during each month of the year. This could be a rolling series say six months in Sprung Watch, six months in Autumun Watch each year, covering different wildlife habitats, experiences, etc. This would help broaden the content and provide ideas for people to witness and enjoy nature outside of the specific broadcast calendars. (2) We're in the process of turning a widlife empty garden into as close as we can get to a nature reserve, though it's proving hard work. Could the programme provide some form of consultation on what we've done and what more we (and i'm sure lots of others) are doing/could do? That could help encourage people to participate in gardening for wildlife (see RSPB, BTO, etc.)? Michael

  • Comment number 32.

    I am not a Facebook fan or a twitter one for that matter and more importantly NOT all people who watch TV have a computer at home so why do you always assume this when setting questions and answers i'll never know.

    And it some areas the red button does not work.

    So if you want people to get more involve remember these things.

    Also why is it this week the message boards are not open yet when the programme is on Friday.

  • Comment number 33.

    Hello, good morning! :) I've told in other various places about a tame robin who I think would be wonderful Unsprung material. I think someone like Bill Oddie once said he'd rather see something common doing something unusual, then something rare doing nothing at all. And this Lil' Larry robin of mine comes when I call him - every time I call him - 'Larry, Larry' & he's down. I've followed him since he left the nest on 23rd July, photographed, filmed, played with him... when he was young he would fly past my ear, stroke his feathers across the side of my face in flight, land on my head & look into my eyes upside down. He would let me get so close I could photograph his tiny delicate feathers with my Macro lens. I've studied him in great detail, he has a whole series of sounds from clicks, whistles, rattles - he's let me into his world as I think he sees me as a robin too. Once he even felt so relaxed in my company that he began to sunbathe next to me on the cushion on the bench with me next to him - I have the photographs!

    He's also rather famous in these parts & been featured in 2 local newspaper articles about myself & my photography:

    North Devon Journal:

    http://www.thisisnorthdevon.co.uk/Everyday-garden-life-captured-camera/story-13154958-detail/story.html

    Western Morning News:

    http://www.thisisdevon.co.uk/Gardener-s-stunning-photographic-diary-captures/story-13163294-detail/story.html

    I belong to a photographic journal called Blipfoto & every day my photo usually features Lil' Larry & he's recognised throughout the entire blip community, everyone knows it's him via his thumbnail - he's a real poser, he adores the camera & I swear he spends most of his morning preening himself for his daily photo shoot. His Flickr set is updated daily:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/emyjane/sets/72157627167887261/

    He's now a fully grown adult robin, he's set up his own territory in the front garden.. & his story is ongoing! :)

  • Comment number 34.

    I'm lucky enough to live beside four lakes and every day I go out with the camera, grain and a few slices of brown bread.

    This year saw some racey behaviour from the resident mute swans when an unattached pen courted a cob who's mate was incubating and therefore conveniently out of the way. By the time the rightful lady of the manor emerged with three cygnets she was attacked by her usurper while the male bird just let them get on with it. This led to the cygnets being neglected although one was rescued and is due for release soon.

    This behaviour seems fairly familliar to those who spend a lot of time watching mute swans but remains largely unrecorded. After all 'everyone knows' that swans pair for life.. Has anyone else witnessed this behaviour?

    I have a number of photos taken through this process and hope to record the moment when young Cyd returns to the wild.

  • Comment number 35.

    Hi team,good to have you back.My Mum has a big wasp nest in a tree in the garden which has been very busy all Summer.We would love to examine it once it's empty-when will the wasps finally leave?

  • Comment number 36.

    p_r 35. Poke it...with a long stick.

  • Comment number 37.

    Hi All,
    Whilst on me Hols on mainland Orkney I collected some strange looking Casts or pellets - similar to those that owls regurgitate, However these contained almost exclusively insect remains, my first thought was Kestrel, but then I spotted black Headed Gulls hovering over cow parsley and feeding on the flies, and the pellets that I found were consistant with this diet. It would be great to have a positive ID C'os even my local RSPB warden could not tell me what they were. I wish to send them to Chris P but do not know the address - can you help?
    thanks

  • Comment number 38.

    We always look forward to the arrival of the swifts in May, and are so sad when they leave in August - where exactly do they go, and do they go back to the same place? When they return do we get the same family group back. Not a very autumnal question, but they are such well loved birds and seem a bit of a mystery!

  • Comment number 39.

    Hi

    I took a picture on Sunday at Mudeford nr Bournemouth, which appears to be a penguin!!! which I'm sure it cant be, would love to hear what the Autumnwatch team think. I don't understand the photo uploading, and got in a right pickle with it, is there another way I could send the photo to you, if you are interested.

    Many thanks

    Judi

  • Comment number 40.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 41.

    Email as sent to BBC Wales, copied to POV:


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbpointsofview/NF1951574?thread=8280038
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbpointsofview/NF1951566?thread=8279861&skip=50
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbpointsofview/NF1951566?thread=8234257&post=110480519#p110480519

    Stuff the viewers in Wales who don't like sport and are fed up with chaotic postponements of popular programmes.
    You have signed a deal with S4C and the Welsh Rugby Union to show rugby, rugby, rugby for years to come.
    BBC cuts - people lose their jobs, but live rugby union is (what a surprise) 'protected'.
    What a bad joke.
    Viewers in Wales should get a licence fee refund.

  • Comment number 42.

    We're hearing on Radio 4 this morning that the warm weather has attracted a large number of rare moths to the UK this autumn - I'm sure Chris has been tracking them down, and can entertain us with his Moth Top Ten! We tend to think of them as drab creatures, but would like to see the variety and attractiveness that is being mentioned on the Today programme- but weirdly that's not too good on radio!

  • Comment number 43.

    This is not a moan but a plea - what with the recent large influx of moths into the UK recently, I feel that moths deserve a mention on Autumnwatch (apart from one brief slot, moths did not get a mention on Springwatch!).

    With moths like the The Vestal, Flame Brocade, Deaths Head Hawk-moth and Crimson Speckled reaching our shores these deserve a mention - You just need to look a picture of a Crimson Speckled to see how beautiful moths are!

  • Comment number 44.

    Hi, Welcome back team, looking forward to the new series. but is it autumn or is it spring? In a tree just 10 feet from our upstairs window is a collared dove sitting on eggs ! The pair have been sitting for the last 2 weeks and we are eagerly awaiting developments.

  • Comment number 45.

    SEASON OF SPIDERS ...
    (and a lot of weather we've been having lately ..!)

    A few questions on these omnipresent autumn "friends" -

    - Do spiders register different temperatures and do they favour particular temperatures or surfaces or just reside in places which provide both good shelter and food? These amazing creatures are very much in evidence at present, with webs visible everywhere alongside the Tower of London and in the local riverside parks and gardens - including loads of different types and sizes on our minute riverside balcony! They seem not to distinguish between natural and man-made structures, apparently being equally at home on the - presumably much hotter/colder - metal railings as on the increasingly bare autumn stems and twigs etc.
    - When do spiders sleep? I've noticed that our balcony spiders seem to hide during the day but then hang in the middle of their webs once darkness descends? Is this a different predatory ploy or do they simply feel safer from their own predators at night? Are there both diurnal and noctural types of arachnid??
    - Could the increased spider numbers apparent here this year be due, at least partly, to the suddenly shockingly low numbers of local garden/songbirds?

    (And, further to this last question, some observations and additional questions re our local birds ...)
    (NB - cont'd on another blog ..!)

    Thanks, regards and good luck! TB

    PS - I see from the posts of others that spiders seem also to be doing well elsewhere - any info.on why this is particularly so this autumn/year would be much appreciated; thanks, TB.

  • Comment number 46.

    Please can you help identify a bird we saw in our garden in Southampton? I have a photo. Is there an email address I can sent it to. We think it is a wheatear but can't be sure.

    Thanks

  • Comment number 47.

    Did no bats get tangled up in Martin Hughes Gaymes hair ? Martin please get your hair cut

  • Comment number 48.

    Hi all, just wondered if there's a good reason why the majority of birds have deserted my feeders in the last week? I usually have to refill a black sunflower seed feeder,add two fat balls, and refill the crushed peanut feeder every day, but they have all lasted 6 days before refilling. Can't think of anything diferent in the garden / increased human activity to disturb them. Chaffinches, Sparrows, tits & Woodpeckers rarely seen -- have they found a better food source to prepare for Winter? I didn't notice this behaviour in previous years. Cheers, Trev.

  • Comment number 49.

    Loving that the show is being broadcast from Westonbirt Arboretum - my husband and I married there a week ago today. Also had our honeymoon in the Wye Valley - with the sound of owls, bats flying around, and plenty of squirrels. Also saw my first Red Kite during our honeymoon. Would love a hello to me & my husband Lewis x

  • Comment number 50.

    this week I have had bluetits visiting a nest box in my garden. One goes in and stays a while popping it's head in and out. are they nesting in October.

  • Comment number 51.

    Earlier this week I opened the window of my room in student halls and had about 15 ladybirds fly in. Most were the usual red with black spots but some were black with red spots. I've heard that you shouldn't pick up some ladybirds. Is that true and why?

  • Comment number 52.

    Any chance we can hear that Tawny Owl call again as where i live i know of at least 2 owls within hearing range but have never been able to see them well enough to identify them!!!

  • Comment number 53.

    Question for Unsprung.

    I have a badger that is marking its territory in our small terraced back garden by digging large holes and filling them. If I fill these holes back in with the soil, am I encouraging the badger to repeat his actions? He/she is digging plants up and even thought I love him/her visiting is starting to cause alot of damage.
    Many thanks

  • Comment number 54.

    My wing mirror spider has travelled many miles with me over this spring and summer. It and it's basic web have hung on wherever I've gone, whatever the weather! Do we have a specialisation here or just an adaptable arachnid that loves speed!

  • Comment number 55.

    Hi
    We have a Hedgehog that calls out at night & sounds just like a Duck, any ideas?

  • Comment number 56.

    Good to see Autumnwatch back. My question is: we are seeing great tits visit our feeders who have an obvious bright red growth on their body. What is this? Is it life threatening?

  • Comment number 57.

    Just watching the story on Bats. We have one that visits our attic,and has done so for a number of years, but doesn't seem to hang about for long (pardon the pun!) Do bats have a habit of just staying over the odd night? He always seems to be alone.

  • Comment number 58.

    Saw Martin on Tresco, Isles of Scilly a few weeks ago. Is he going to report on the wildlife of this very special place?

  • Comment number 59.

    Took my bird-box down to clean it out. When do I need to get it up again for blue tits to nest?

  • Comment number 60.

    we have a badger that comes into our garden every night around 8.30 , later in the evening around 10 to 12 we have seen 2 different ones but we have only ever seen 1 at a time is this normal for them to go out searching for food on their own?

  • Comment number 61.

    While fishing a couple of weeks ago i noticed a snake swimming towards me from the opposite bank. It came within 2 feet of the bank & turned & swam away. I was amazed as i had never seen a snake in the wild before.
    Any idea as to the type of snake this could be? I couldn't really make out any colourings though.
    Kind regards, J Thrupp

  • Comment number 62.

    BAT MAP: great to see bats on the programm again! But how do we identify them? Have seem bats all over the country but no idea what species live where, can you give us a bat map of what speices we see where? Also I was suprised to see them in mallorca last week, again no idea on the species!

  • Comment number 63.

    In tonight's show Chris and Martin were talking about osprey and I noticed that whilst Chris said 'what a magnificent bill' or something to that effect, Martin said it was a beautiful beak. Is there a differencebetween a bill and a beak or are they synonimous? Hope you can help

  • Comment number 64.

    Hi there, We'be had a family of grass snakes basking on our compost heap under an old carpet. They seem to have gone, but we're wondering if it's ok to tur nthe compost? Are they likely to return to the same spot next summer? Great show
    Lyndon and Vicki

  • Comment number 65.

    Dear Autumn watch

    I wonder if someone, maybe Chris, can help me?

    Recently whilst out walking I noticed on two seperate occasions on the same day a wasp attacking a bee on the ground. I know wasps will try and enter a beehive to take honey but I've never seen them attack bees outside of a hive. I've looked online but have so far been unable to find an explanation.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks

  • Comment number 66.

    At the end of this summer a lot of garden visitors have disappeared especially Blue Tits which were in abundance following a successful season for young. The nut feeder has been virtually untouched for about a month. This is unlike previous years when as I live in a semi rural location adjacent to woodland, hedgerow & paddocks the feeding station is normally constantly active all year round. Is there a reason for this, the weather? virus? We do get sparrowhawks every year but the birds seem to have all disappeared overnight.

  • Comment number 67.

    Love to have you back. Can you please tell me where Kate Humble is? Thanks.

  • Comment number 68.

    Hi we are watching autumn watch from the Netherlands. You just mentioned that Britain is the only European country without large predators. It's the same here in the Netherlands, no big predators here! However, in some areas there are many wild boars. Suddenly, a few weeks a go there was the first visit of a wild wolf, that came over from Germany. A few hundred of kilometers over the border there are the nearest packs living, and it seemd to have been a young male that was wandering in search of a new place to live. It even has been on the national news here!

  • Comment number 69.

    Nice to see chris quoting songs from my fave band the damned.ie:grimly fiendish,smash it up and new rose.luv the show.

  • Comment number 70.

    Can someone please tell me when the blackbirds will be back?

  • Comment number 71.

    A- tawny owl
    B- beaver chewed wood
    c- ptamigan droppings?

  • Comment number 72.

    A: Sparrowhawk
    B: Beaver
    C: Pine martin

  • Comment number 73.

    Question for unsprung.

    I'm going to stay in Balmoral in two weeks and what wildlife can I expect to see there?

    Craig

  • Comment number 74.

    plz help i have a hedgehog hibernating in my gardan in a plastic bag should i leave it in there!!

  • Comment number 75.

    Where is the quiz? I can never find it!!!

  • Comment number 76.

    Hi is is possible for a Barnacle goose and a greylag goose to cross?
    On holiday this year in Cleethorpes I saw a flock of barnacle geese with a very strange looking goose and it was a greylag shape with Barnacle plumage
    I would send you a photo if I knew how to do it.
    Carole

  • Comment number 77.

    My first viewing of Autumnwatch this season and already the farming community comes under fire on hedgerows. Do you guys not realise how tightly farming is regulated these days? Please, a little more support, background reading and understanding before you share your poorly researched views with the unsuspecting public... I'm sure Adam Henson would be only too pleased to offer assistance...

  • Comment number 78.

    This year I managed to track down one of the Cumbrian Ospreys in Gambia. I captured some still images you can see here. http://www.cumbrialive.tv/OspreyGambia/ as well as shoot some footage of the Osprey called Nr12. Maybe your viewers would be interested in this story. It was pretty exciting actually tracking down the very Osprey I saw conceived (footage of that too!) on the side of Bassenthwaite. Martin Campell - Cumbria [Personal details removed by Moderator]

  • Comment number 79.

    A. Woodcock
    B. Beaver
    C. Pine Martin

  • Comment number 80.

    If flies don't like blue how do bluebottles get on?

  • Comment number 81.

    Can you tell me when Eagle Owls became extinct in the British Isles and why the RSPB has such a downer on their reintroduction?
    Thanks Roland

  • Comment number 82.

    A) Goshawk B) Beaver felled twig C) Otter spraint

  • Comment number 83.

    tawny owl
    beaver
    capercaillie droppings (like red grouse but bigger)

    am I correct to say the white tip is the urea which we pass in urine

    (as always I've found it tricky to find this thread)

  • Comment number 84.

    a: cuckoo
    b: beaver
    c: sea otter

  • Comment number 85.

    quiz answer
    Tawny Owl
    Beaver
    Pine Marten

  • Comment number 86.

    A= Barn owl
    B= Beaver
    C= Pine Martin

  • Comment number 87.

    Love all the Damned songs Chris. Spotted 5 so far - New Rose, Neat Neat Neat, Grimly Fiendish, Smash It Up & Nasty. Keep it up.

  • Comment number 88.

    re the seagull going after the pipistrelle. It is a very big deal as it will take years for the local population of bats to recover from such an attack and just think that it was probably a maternity roost and, as I recall, this film was taken early July (was on Youtube), so it would be the mums coming out and getting eaten and babies would just have died inside the roost!! Yes it does happen and it's nature but bats needs more protection from such attacks and it's possible to put a ledge to avoid this (has been done against other bird predators elsewhere). Shoo the bird away next time!

  • Comment number 89.

    Can you tell me what they fed the baby squirrels before they were weaned? Was it kitten milk?

  • Comment number 90.

    Why are ladybirds so attracted to nettles an why don't they like the colour purple? Thanks.

  • Comment number 91.

    Question..last year I saw a white house sparrow (or I assumed it was a house sparrow because it lived with other house sparrows) when I was living in Gloucester. It was not an albino as it had dark eyes and brown 'eyebrows'. Unfortunately I could not get close enough to get a picture and the RSPB didn't get back to me about it. Have the team ever seen one or are they extremely rare?

  • Comment number 92.

    I live in northern France and just today I saw 2 boar in a field as I was driving to get my children from school. We often see them here and they are never a problem. They are quite secretive animals. If you leave them alone then they will leave you alone.

  • Comment number 93.

    hi all loving the new autumn watch think the albino squirril is cute my son also is loving the new programe

  • Comment number 94.

    I watched a humming bird hawk moth around plants in a beer garden in egremont near Whitehaven cumbria last Friday. I didn't know what it was until watching the show tonight

  • Comment number 95.

    Sorry but please bring back Kate !!! not the same

  • Comment number 96.

    Saw an albino squirrel in my next door neighbours garden on Christmas Eve last year. Managed to get a photo. Very cute. When I googled them I was surprised how common they are.

  • Comment number 97.

    Any expert advice about keeping chickens for a beginner? Planning to get 2 or 3 in the spring time.

    Much appreciated

  • Comment number 98.

    My 9 year old daughter loves watching spring and autumn watch and would love to ask a question, 'why do ladybirds have spots and why do some have more than others?'

  • Comment number 99.

    Help Please,

    Hi, sorry to bother you but we are in need of some advice.
    A friend of mine has two carrion crows in her garden and they can't fly. They are a few months old and their wings look very small and don't seem to have flight feathers. They walk around all day and seem to live in the brambles, however we are worried about the onset of winter and their chances of survival against predators.

    My questions are as follows;

    Is there anything we can do to help them.
    Will their flight feathers grow in the next molt or is this a generic disorder.
    Is this a common problem, as I have never came across it before.

    We would really appreciate any advice you can give.

    Regards
    John
    South Wales

  • Comment number 100.

    Over the summer I have had a tail-less squirrel in the garden though I haven't seen it over the last couple of months. Is it possible that it has grown a new tail? Why didn't it have a tail and would this have caused problems for it's mobility?

 

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