[an error occurred while processing this directive]
« Previous | Main | Next »

Springwatch highlights: Wednesday 9th June

Jeremy Torrance web producer Jeremy Torrance web producer | 17:50 UK time, Thursday, 10 June 2010

Here in Pensthorpe, Kate and Chris looked at how the avocet chicks had to start learning to feed straight away. The kestrel chicks were suffering in the bad weather. Not as much as the poor little ringer plovers though. This drama on the scrape was definitely one of our highlights of the day.

Down in Dorset, Simon watched the young Kingcombe roe deer bond with its mother. But it was the mute swan story that was our highlight.

Ian Llewellyn's kingfisher diary and Hugh Miles provided more beauty from the River Wensum. Our last highlight, however, was one for the ladies... you could resist Chris in a wetsuit.

Which were your favourites? You can watch more clips from the show here.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    I like the plovers more.

  • Comment number 2.

    The kestrel chicks and the bad weather prompts a question that I've always wanted Springwatch (or any other nature programme for that matter) to answer: where, how, with what and when do birds roost at night? There's bags of day-time stuff with them all running around like crazy, but how do they keep warm at night, stay dry and find suitable protection.
    With all the high tech. gadgetry now available to the team, it should not be too difficult to keep track of them and show them in snooze mode. Or is it?

  • Comment number 3.

    Herons at university. Limerick University Ireland has a heronary in huge pine trees very close to one of the buildings and the river Shannon. As a student there I spent many hours studying (herons). The baby chicks make a noise like a bale elevator. One fell out of the nest but i didn't see it climbing back up the tree. Apparently this heronary has been in existance for over a century, well before the university was built. This is a very busy area with students, graduates and visitors passing beneath the heronary every day, lawn mowers and tractors are frequently used too. There was nine nests in three trees in 2003. I counted over 15 chicks but dont know how many survived.In 2006 only three nests were observed. I try to visit UL around the nesting season, but have not been back yet this year. Thanks for a brilliant programme

  • Comment number 4.

    I particularly like the kingfisher diary, I've only ever seen a kingfisher once when I was a teenager (a LOT of years ago) - they are such beautiful birds.

    Here's a geeky question for Chris or Simon. My daughter asked me the other night during SW - you can get mammals born blind or deaf, can you also get birds who hatch with similar situations, and would they be able to fledge, let alone survive?
    She also asked - can basking sharks actually close their mouths or are they permanently wide open? (Wikipedia says no, but a couple of other web pages say yes!)
    thanks SW :)

  • Comment number 5.

    Loved Hugh Miles work with fish, he's right, I don't believe they get enough of a public profile either, i'd love to be doing that sort of work, really getting to know the british fish in their element, and photographing them. The beauty and behaviour of them is so seldom captured. Just seeing a flotilla of perch really got my creative juices going.

  • Comment number 6.


    I have seen these webs? on the bushes on the road from Romsey Hamshire to Stockbridge, also at Hedge End Southampton, those were full of stiped caterpillers,and also clusters of the caterpillars were on the stems of the bush. the bushes looked as though they were dying.

    Love your programme.
    audreyhazell

 

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.