In recent posts I've asked you which short stories have made great films (and lousy ones) also which Linda Blair films are best. Here I give some of your best responses an airing.

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  • Comment number 24. Posted by The__Joker

    on 19 Jul 2011 03:18

    @Ironspider

    Just tried to post but somehow it didn't make it. Hope this one gets through. You said:

    "I always used to stop my VHS copy of Blade Runner, the 'original' version, when the lift door's closed"

    I answered, It's quite a common experience.

    You asked:

    Does anyone else have examples of films that go beyond their logical or philosophical ending?

    I answered, The Hitcher is the perfect example. If it had ended about 14 minutes earlier, it would have been magnificent.

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  • Comment number 23. Posted by Matt

    on 18 Jul 2011 22:09

    Candyman is a great short story that stretched well to feature length. Racking my brain for others... Minority report. Also worth a read.

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  • Comment number 22. Posted by Roy Batty

    on 14 Jul 2011 12:54

    Hi there,

    I have just been reading James and the Giant Peach to my 20 month old daughter and remembered how much I enjoyed the 1996 Stop motion animation film directed by Henry Selick, but hated the Wes Anderson version of The fantastic Mr. Fox. While I'm on the subject of Roald Dahl I absolutely loved Gene Wilder's darker version of Willy Wonka and prefer it to Johnny Depps child like character in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.


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  • Comment number 21. Posted by Ideas of Order

    on 13 Jul 2011 14:08

    In reference to Ironspider's comments, I think Total Recall is a decent film and one of the better Philip K. Dick adaptations, which isn't to say it sticks to the story or some such, but that it gets his flavour. It's mischievous, plays gleefully with reality up until the very last frame, and has a tongue-in-cheek humour, which most PKD adaptations simply jettison altogether - a shame, because Dick's a funny writer. Minority Report is an interesting, if Hollywoodized, adaptation of one of his short stories.

    Films going beyond their logical endings: perhaps this is the grouch in me who yearns for existentialist misery, but I used to think Sideways should have ended after Miles finds out some distressing news from his wife and goes to drown his sorrows with his most precious bottle of wine. Perfect bleakness!

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  • Comment number 20. Posted by Ironspider

    on 12 Jul 2011 13:58

    As an aside to the main thread, but following on from Joel Cooney's comment about natural conclusions in a film, here's a thought and a question:

    I always used to stop my VHS copy of Blade Runner, the 'original' version, when the lift door's closed (if you know the film you'll know to when I'm referring) as that always seemed to be the logical end of the film. I found out later that it was - the final scene being an out-take from another film added after a test-screening showed the audience wanted a happier ending (well go and watch Bambi then...).

    Does anyone else have examples of films that go beyond their logical or philosophical ending? I always thought it was director's not knowing when to stop (Thin Red Line anyone) but maybe test audiences are to blame! I'd be interested to hear Dr K's opinion on test audiences in general - good or bad idea?

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  • Comment number 19. Posted by Ironspider

    on 12 Jul 2011 13:46

    The biggest problem with most short-story adaptations is the director or screenwriter trying to pad out the source material. I have no objections to such a practise, as long as the additions don't warp the initial narrative completely out of shape (Johnny Mnemonic for example).

    Others keep referring to Kubrick's AI (as re-imagined by Spielberg, hence the awful ending) which takes more than a few liberties with Aldiss' Super-toys Last All Summer Long. It's a good example of a reasonable film using a badly-warped version of a short story. Total Recall (is it really being remade? Why?), from We Can Remember it for You Wholesale, is a good example of any of the Philip K Dick adaptations that have done little justice to the original (Screamers from Second Variety is a much better attempt).

    I've always had a problem with book adaptations in general, few directors do the source material justice. And I think many perceive short stories as a lesser literary form even more amenable to their personal revisions.

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  • Comment number 18. Posted by They Cant Believe Im Not Bitter

    on 12 Jul 2011 10:03

    Kubrick, Kubrick, Kubrick. Ye Gods, there are other filmmakers, y'know.
    This is about the SHORT STORY - not fanboys drooling over directors.
    I'm gonna call out Joyce's sublime The Dead, so masterfully and sympathetically brought to the screen by John Huston.
    And a special mention to George Langelaan's The Fly.

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  • Comment number 17. Posted by KubrickandScott

    on 12 Jul 2011 00:04

    Off-topic but on the subject of Kubrick: I was staying in a hotel the other night before a job interview, and was kept awake by the unusually intrusive soundtrack of Eyes Wide Shut which was playing on late-night TV in the room next door. I turned on out of curiosity (having not seen the film for several years) and watched til the end (about 2am). Despite the fact that it's very slow, I fail to understand why Mark would hate it - perhaps another one for him to re-evaluate?

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  • Comment number 16. Posted by Supa Dave

    on 11 Jul 2011 23:08

    The frustrating thing about AI is that when you describe the film it sounds really good. But watching it was just painful. Not seen it since at cinema, but it was so bad I was heckling and everybody else joined in. I accept it might be better upon 2nd viewing, but Im happy to not give it a 2nd chance.

    Can anyone help me put my finger on exactly whey the film went so badly wrong? its obvious it had its head up its own backside, but there must be more to it that made such a good concept a total failure.

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  • Comment number 15. Posted by Joel_Cooney

    on 10 Jul 2011 15:34

    Also... "Wot no Philip K. Dick?". I did mention him (much later) but a number of commenters mentioned him - surely worth a note in this topic?

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