Next week sees the release of Side By Side - a new documentary presented by Keanu Reeves and featuring an impressive cast of filmmakers looking at a subject close to my heart - the difference between digital and analogue production and projection.

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  • Comment number 118. Posted by Seb R

    on 13 Aug 2013 18:44

    'Cinemaaa! Cinemaaa!!'- Ben, Man Bites Dog.

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  • Comment number 117. Posted by TonyEllisPhotographycouk

    on 18 Jun 2013 07:26

    Surely the 35mm format may have helped reign in the monstrous ego of George Lucas when putting his vision of the Star wars prequels to the screen?
    I wished in deeply that he would dig out all of his 70's film cameras to resume his epic tale but alas he fell in to the trap of thinking that the freedom and 'democracy' of the digital system would somehow patch up seriously shoddy character and narrative work. Imagine how easy it would have been to dismiss a 'real' foam Jar Jar Binks mask as a bad idea if Mr Lucas ever came face to face with it.....

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  • Comment number 116. Posted by Pleiades

    on 14 Feb 2013 05:23

    Loads of good suggestions here - but in relation to one of the first comments, yes Side by Side focuses on film production, it also looks at archiving issues, and the "look and feel" of the final product, how you connect with what you are seeing. Like, the warmth and texture which film can bring (the "physicality" as Keanu has often said, being the film as a medium for the story it contains), this physicality also giving us the flaws inherit in the medium, the scratches, the fading, the dodgey sound, all those fun things which have you reaching for the popcorn. But I also love digital, and the way it can bring some of my sci-fi dreams into reality in ways I could never imagined. For me, the keystone sitting between the two media which can make or break them is the archiving issue. A film reel will keep for hundreds of years providing it is looked after well, and all you need to do is get a light behind it to see the story. Perhaps there are archiving systems that I'm not aware of for the digital media industry...but I would imagine digital storage would appear to have more pitfalls. I don't work in the industry so this is a somewhat arbitary observation, however I've had some data issues and nearly lost seven years worth of personal photos once... I don't wholly trust digital media as an archiving format.

    So many movies I've seen mention I'd love to see again in 35 mm. All good choices. I'll put two forward which I don't think have been mentioned.

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Really, just for the fun of it, and ideally on a warm tropical night in an al fresco screening with snacks and drinks and big pillows and blankets.

    District 9 converted to 35 mm, and maybe left out of the reel and hand-wound in to make sure it HAD some scratches. I think it would add to the doco perspective of the whole thing.

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  • Comment number 115. Posted by Aman Somal

    on 12 Feb 2013 19:15

    Lawrence of Arabia, if this was shot in digital it would not be the classic it is today.

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  • Comment number 114. Posted by SmithytheFilmFan

    on 11 Feb 2013 23:25

    It's an easy choice for me: David Lean's "The Bridge on the River Kwai." It's my favorite film of all time and one that I most want to see on the big screen in 35mm. I'm sure anyone who has seen the film understands why. The grand and beautiful photography by Jack Hildyard and Lean's epic set pieces are meant for the big screen and for me 35mm is just as vital to the experience. It's an event film and 35mm, the look of it when projected properly, damages and all, make it feel like an event. And the explosive finale? I'd be in heaven.

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  • Comment number 113. Posted by DrBalthar

    on 11 Feb 2013 20:00

    Mark get over it, celluloid is dead! There are simply no companies left that produce any celluloid as the production of all former companies that this has more or less shut down. And see what happened to those companies that didn't jump to digital? Do I need to say Kodak? They are bankcrupt. A full digital production pipeline is so much smoother, cheaper and faster.Besides current generation of digital high-end camera like Sony F65 & F55 have sensors which can produce pictures beyond 35mm.

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  • Comment number 112. Posted by Mike

    on 11 Feb 2013 16:55

    Although recently, I had the opportunity to see Craven's classic original A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET on big screen recently, a whole college film class was in attendance, and they were all very disrespectful of the film, laughing at anything that was slightly dated, making peanut gallery Mystery Science Theater 3000 style comments. They almost ruined the whole experience for me, so it's a two-edged sword :P.

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  • Comment number 111. Posted by yadayadayada

    on 11 Feb 2013 16:05

    I'm a sucker for Christopher Doyles cinematography in Chung King Express. Wonderfully capturing the bright lights and frenetic engery of 90s Kowloon.

    Years ago I bought the artifical eye dvd. Thinking back i remember is the old VHS copy.
    I prefered the vhs.The copies are probably identical. BUT the imperfections of VHS (the static and vertical rolling lines) and wear and tear of that copy, ment that I was actually watching something thats more alive something that was playing for me.

    I think an old 35mm print would add to the vibrant and wild journey through an ever changing never stopping cityscape of Hong Kong.

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  • Comment number 110. Posted by Jayblackhall

    on 11 Feb 2013 11:50

    Videodrome mate, to see a clean sterile version of an itchy uncomfortable movie next to a scratchy dirty version of an uncomfortable film. I love the film for its unbelievable imagery and effects. But I think it would be interesting to see the feelings the film would provoke in both formats as it could change the WHOLE perception of the film.

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  • Comment number 109. Posted by Curt_M

    on 10 Feb 2013 23:34

    I would love to see a 35mm print of George Lucas's original 1977 un-spolit version of Star Wars. It would be a great antidote to George Lucas constant tinkering to see a film that was scrappy and messy in terms off effects but also sublime, and which no amount of digitising and adding of CGI lizards can ever improve.

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